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Hello this is my first post and thanks in advance for everyone's assistance.

I have a 2007 EX in fantastic shape (mint inside and out so it appears former owner cared about the car) with 90,000 miles on it, I bought it from a Subaru dealer with 68,000 miles and have done the oil changes every time the light goes on. Last visit the Honda dealer did a full synthetic and then they suggested a lot of work. I don't have records for the car and they say at the dealer they "know the car" and oil changes like clockwork but no record of any of this work

  1. Cabin air filter hmm I just swapped it out for a new one a month ago?

  2. Power steering fluid exchange "Dirty"

  3. Engine coolant exchange "Dirty"

  4. Drive belt "dry and glazed"

  5. Transmission fluid change

  6. Transmission Service

  7. Differential Service

  8. Fuel Injector Cleaning

  9. Clean and Lube brake pads "sticking"

    Wow that feels like a lot of work, Soo, what sounds like Wallet Flush and what sounds necessary and what would the priority be to do the work in. Thanks again for your thoughts.
 

Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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LOL, good thing you checked here. :cautious:

Do you know how to check 'future maintenance codes' on the Maintenance Minder? Do a SEARCH if you don't. You should have made a note of those services before you reset the oil change indicator..(Maintenance Minder)

Be aware that when you DIY things out of sequence (as in, the Cabin Filter) you cannot erase the code individually. Also, if you reset the MM you also reset the codes for anything you didn't do.

Also be aware that the MM is primarily mileage triggered (except for oil changes). Many items also need to be performed on a TIME basis... So, HERE WE GO:

1. If you changed the Cabin Filter, no action required. I mean jeeeeeze, you can see it) Same for engine air: inspect it, change it if it is dirty, then write the date & mileage on it with a Sharpie with the date.

2. There is no Power Steering replacement interval from Honda. Many of us change it at around 100K miles. Buy two 12 oz bottles from the parts counter, then suck the old stuff out of the reservoir with a turkey baster or an old pump-sprayer. Refill it, and repeat after driving until you have used both bottles.

3. Coolant: on low mileage cars should be done every 100K miles or 10 years, then every 5 years after that ('cause you don't get all the old stuff out) Always use Honda Type II (blue) coolant.

4. That's another thing with no interval. If it isn't squealing or chirping its doing its job. You can DIY it if you purchase the Serpentine Belt Tool from Harbor Freight for $25. We changed ours at ~120K 'just because'.

5. Replace (drain & fill) the trans using Honda DW-1 every 30K miles or 3 years. (NEVER flush) If you don't have records an/or are experiencing erratic shifting, this needs to be done 3X in order to change most of it out.

6. No such thing. Just trying to generate $$$

7. Differential (AWD only): Another thing to replace every 30K miles or 3 years with genuine Honda Dual Pump II fluid only. If it gets old, you will hear moaning on sharp turns on cool mornings from the differential clutches.

8. NO NO NO. Waste of money if the engine is running well. An occasional bottle of Techron or BK44 in the gas tank does the same thing.

9. Brake service: This is actually worthwhile, if the V has lived its life in areas that salt the roads. Just the 'service' every fall should cost you no more than an hour's labor. Consists of cleaning/greasing the caliper slider pins, and assuring that the rear pads are not binding because of corrosion under their stainless steel guides.


I'm going to add a 10. At 100,000 - 120,000 miles, have the valve clearance checked & adjusted (two hours labor, no parts required) and replacing the Iridium spark plugs is required.

++++++++++++++

You can have these services done at an independent (hopefully a Honda specialist) as long as they use the correct fluids.

馃榿馃榿馃榿
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Carbuff2 wow what more could I ask :). I love this little car so definitely want to do the right things to keep it running at least to 250. Thank you very much

I will check out how to do the future maintenance codes and yes I was aware you cant change things out of the codes sequence and then note that change.

Glad I stopped by the forum
 

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I'll just add that the CR-V is generally a dream to work on compared to my American counterpart. Accessing the locations to drain and fill the fluids is fairly easy. No pan to drop, no bead of RTV. But you will need a long funnel for the transmission fluid refill.

+1 on the serp belt tool from HF.

I also recommend https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-24680-Spill-Free-Funnel/dp/B00A6AS6LY - if you decide to DIY the coolant.

+1 on "NO" injector cleaner

I believe #9 is to lube the caliper guide pins. This is just a little bit of labor, and something you can DIY when you rotate your tires. You'll want the correct brake grease - SilGlyde is probably fine - https://www.amazon.com/AGS-SG4-Lubricant/dp/B0036VMLH0/

If you get too far into the brakes, you may want a one of these to remove the rotors https://www.amazon.com/Vessel-125943-P3x150-Impacta-Screwdriver/dp/B003BGTTSE - I just did my wife's CR-V brakes, and used Centric rotors and Akibono pads.

Given it only has 90k miles, it likely still has it's first set of brakes. There's a Japanese screw that holds the rotor on during assembly. It's typically rusted/fused to the rotor. This screwdriver will let you pop those screws out without too much effort.
 

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Long list.

Most of it is as needed. Belt should be changed every few years. 5 and 6 are the same thing.

Injector cleaning, if it was induction service then yes (cleans from the throttle plate on through, good idea to clean out carbon), injector cleaning is just a can of cleaner you can buy. Dont wait till running bad to do induction though, ounce of prevention....

Take it to an independent shop and likely get a better list and dont replace things you just changed.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

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Nothing to add other than to pat those on the back who have replied. Awesome suggestions - this community is lucky to have so many knowledgeable members ready to reply!
 

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I find it much easier to remove the engine mount to get to the belt tensioner--whoever designed the engine bay left almost no room to get a wrench on the tensioner due to the engine mount being in the way. That mount can be removed in about five minutes, supporting the engine from underneath with a floor jack. The serpentine belt tools need a special curvature to properly fit around the components, so the generic ones won't work. (I've tried.) Snap-On used to sell a tool, but it's long discontinued. Nothing to fear from removing an engine mount, and it makes the work so much easier.

The screws in the brake rotors need JIS cross-head. They look similar but have a different shape to the bit. A Phillips bit will work, but it partially damages the screw head and/or the bit, depending on the impact set you use. (Don't ask how I know this.) Soak them with a good penetrating spray first.

And it goes without saying--aside from engine oil (and possibly brake fluid), always use Honda fluids. Not Honda "compatible."

One thing some of us recommend for a used vehicle we've just purchased is to do a lot of the maintenance up front. With both of our '09s, I had no idea how old any of the fluids were, or the spark plugs. So over the course of a month or two, I would change different fluids and bring it completely up to date.
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Clean and Lube brake pads "sticking"
Here's visual evidence as to why @Carbuff2 is right. Properly functioning brakes should never need a hammer to remove the pads. They should just fall out.

My only concern would be are they an honest shop? They could just 'pencil-whip' it (say they did it, take your cash, but they didn't really do it), and unless you crawled under the car or removed a tire or two, you'd likely never know.

You would also want them to bleed the brake fluid out. This needs to be done every 3 years regardless of mileage. Brake fluid is hygroscopic (a fancy word that means "it absorbs water") and water reduces the fluid's boiling point. Your brakes get pretty hot when used, so if the brake fluid boils, you lose your brakes. Also, water in the lines allows the brake lines to rust not only from the outside, but the inside as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
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CRV 2007 96,334
So I went to another Honda dealer and asked about doing the brake service to clean and lube the brake pads because I don't have the courage to do that myself and they quoted me 119.00 then they noticed I had a B 1,3 codes.
And proposed the following for $416
The transmission fluid drained, the differential fluid drained, full synthetic oil and filter, brake calipers were taken apart and lubed, brake fluid replaced, parking brake adjusted, cooling system check OK, battery tested OK fuel injection system cleaner installed, tires rotated, new engine air filter and new cabin air filter and inspect everything else on the car. They list $137 in parts so by my calculation it was worth $279 to get it all done then and there.
The other dealer quoted my wife nearly $1200 for context, welcome to Boston.
But as we know all dealer visits beget dealer visits...

1) Lower Ball Joints boots cracking

2) Tie rod boots cracking

3) Rear differential mount torn

Do these items seem right at this mileage and is one more important than the others to do?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here's visual evidence as to why @Carbuff2 is right. Properly functioning brakes should never need a hammer to remove the pads. They should just fall out.

My only concern would be are they an honest shop? They could just 'pencil-whip' it (say they did it, take your cash, but they didn't really do it), and unless you crawled under the car or removed a tire or two, you'd likely never know.

You would also want them to bleed the brake fluid out. This needs to be done every 3 years regardless of mileage. Brake fluid is hygroscopic (a fancy word that means "it absorbs water") and water reduces the fluid's boiling point. Your brakes get pretty hot when used, so if the brake fluid boils, you lose your brakes. Also, water in the lines allows the brake lines to rust not only from the outside, but the inside as well.

Yes those pictures definitely scared me off, living in the northeast, trying to do my own brakes excellent post.
 

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CRV 2007 96,334
So I went to another Honda dealer and asked about doing the brake service to clean and lube the brake pads because I don't have the courage to do that myself and they quoted me 119.00 then they noticed I had a B 1,3 codes.
And proposed the following for $416
The transmission fluid drained, the differential fluid drained, full synthetic oil and filter, brake calipers were taken apart and lubed, brake fluid replaced, parking brake adjusted, cooling system check OK, battery tested OK fuel injection system cleaner installed, tires rotated, new engine air filter and new cabin air filter and inspect everything else on the car. They list $137 in parts so by my calculation it was worth $279 to get it all done then and there.
The other dealer quoted my wife nearly $1200 for context, welcome to Boston.
But as we know all dealer visits beget dealer visits...

1) Lower Ball Joints boots cracking

2) Tie rod boots cracking

3) Rear differential mount torn

Do these items seem right at this mileage and is one more important than the others to do?
Go look for yourself or ask them to show you.

At 90k things can start to fail or go bad. Many of us work on our own vehicle and accept this. It's a Honda but it still wears out. Actually Honda's wear out faster than Toyotas.

Expect you suspension parts to start wearing out too.

I've done a ton of work on my 07 to keep it on the road. I'm at 140k.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Go look for yourself or ask them to show you.

At 90k things can start to fail or go bad. Many of us work on our own vehicle and accept this. It's a Honda but it still wears out. Actually Honda's wear out faster than Toyotas.

Expect you suspension parts to start wearing out too.

I've done a ton of work on my 07 to keep it on the road. I'm at 140k.
Agreed, I don't think they are making this up and they weren't saying the sky was falling just these were some things to keep an eye on and to budget for over the next 6 - 9 months.

And yes I had shocks on the back of my mind like I wonder when they will be going.
 

Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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Some of those operations were advisories. See if they are brought up again at the next visit.

$416 for dealer service isn't bad.

I've had advisories to replace things that were NOT failing (like, suggesting to replace wiper blades THREE WEEKS after I installed a set) :rolleyes:


My daughter brought her Fit in for a recall, and they 'suggested' $1100 of work...LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Some of those operations were advisories. See if they are brought up again at the next visit.

$416 for dealer service isn't bad.

I've had advisories to replace things that were NOT failing (like, suggesting to replace wiper blades THREE WEEKS after I installed a set) :rolleyes:


My daughter brought her Fit in for a recall, and they 'suggested' $1100 of work...LOL
LOL I know what you mean one minute the world will end if you don't fix something and next oil change it doesn't get mentioned, Hmmmm
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Some of those operations were advisories. See if they are brought up again at the next visit.

$416 for dealer service isn't bad.

I've had advisories to replace things that were NOT failing (like, suggesting to replace wiper blades THREE WEEKS after I installed a set) :rolleyes:


My daughter brought her Fit in for a recall, and they 'suggested' $1100 of work...LOL
Agreed Buff it just seemed like if they were going to do the brakes then might as well have them do the other things for just a bit more
But I really appreciate the tip about the brakes it makes perfect sense to lube and maintain them especially here in the Northeast
 

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Welcome to the forum! FYI - Go to your Account Settings. You'll find a place to show your location (state or city) and your vehicle specifics (year, trim level, etc.). Enter that stuff and save. After that, we'll all be able to see it in your Avatar, like you see in mine, and no one will need to ask superfluous questions.

I also have an '07 with 93k on it, in great condition. I'm just doing these things a bit at a time, when it seems appropriate. Mine was a one owner car, purchased from a little old lady in California! Seriously! It came with service records, and I also got a CarFax on it, which contained even more info on maintenance and repairs. Now I keep a record of what I do to it, to stay up to date, including accessories and mods. It's a great car! I've just done the 24F battery upgrade, with smart battery tender. I got the OEM fog light kit and the body side moldings, and a set of Weathertech floor mats. I also plan an audio upgrade soon.

Got any pictures? We love pictures here. Did I mention pictures? What are your future plans for add-ons, etc.?
 

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The screws in the brake rotors need JIS cross-head. They look similar but have a different shape to the bit. A Phillips bit will work, but it partially damages the screw head and/or the bit, depending on the impact set you use. (Don't ask how I know this.) Soak them with a good penetrating spray first.

And it goes without saying--aside from engine oil (and possibly brake fluid), always use Honda fluids. Not Honda "compatible."

One thing some of us recommend for a used vehicle we've just purchased is to do a lot of the maintenance up front. With both of our '09s, I had no idea how old any of the fluids were, or the spark plugs. So over the course of a month or two, I would change different fluids and bring it completely up to date.
Sounds like the OP had someone do the fluids. I will re-state that it's really easy to do those yourself (trans, diff, etc). Honda made accessing the drain bolts a cinch; and doable without raising the vehicle.

I will just say this about the JIS screws. They suck. I'd just plan on drilling them out if you do not purchase the tool I linked above. Obviously, you'll try a Phillips before you grab a drill. And if you just drill them out, like I did, wear eye protection. This one one of the two times recently, while drilling out screws, that I just about caught a piece of a broken drill bit, or the screw itself, it in the eyeball. Both times I thought "I should put my eyes on", and didn't. Shame on me.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Sounds like the OP had someone do the fluids. I will re-state that it's really easy to do those yourself (trans, diff, etc). Honda made accessing the drain bolts a cinch; and doable without raising the vehicle.

I will just say this about the JIS screws. They suck. I'd just plan on drilling them out if you do not purchase the tool I linked above. Obviously, you'll try a Phillips before you grab a drill. And if you just drill them out, like I did, wear eye protection. This one one of the two times recently, while drilling out screws, that I just about caught a piece of a broken drill bit, or the screw itself, it in the eyeball. Both times I thought "I should put my eyes on", and didn't. Shame on me.
I agree but for that price, I gave in, especially since the brakes sound like a bit of a project
 

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I will just say this about the JIS screws. They suck. I'd just plan on drilling them out if you do not purchase the tool I linked above. Obviously, you'll try a Phillips before you grab a drill. And if you just drill them out, like I did, wear eye protection. This one one of the two times recently, while drilling out screws, that I just about caught a piece of a broken drill bit, or the screw itself, it in the eyeball. Both times I thought "I should put my eyes on", and didn't. Shame on me.
Actually, that is not the best tool for this job. This is the tool you want to use. Also for door lock actuators. Far superior for this work:

CRAFTSMAN Hand Impact Driver, 3/8-Inch Set (CMMT14104) - - Amazon.com

Also, yes, be very sure to always use eye protection. It would be terribly ironic to have wasted all that effort fixing up a nice car that you can never drive again for the rest of your life after becoming legally blind. In my youth I built race cars, and I was up under one, late one night, with an angle grinder, working on frame clearances, and I WAS wearing goggles. Suddenly I felt a searing pain in my left eye. Had to stop immediately and roll out. Those goggles were the kind that had the soft clear side face flanges with vent holes to keep them from fogging. The pain kept increasing all night, and by morning my wife was not happy with me, as she had not slept either, and had to take the day off to drive me to the doctor, who sent me to a specialist. By the time I got there and in that doctor's office, it was 12 hours later, and I was ready for someone to shoot me, the pain was so intense. My wife had to lead me around - I could not see at all, could not open either eye. A 1-1/4" steel splinter had been driven vertically into my eye, blown through one of those tiny vent holes by the grinder. I passed out when they applied the anaesthetic. When I woke up, the headache was gone along with the pain, but only temporarily. Both my eyes were patched for two weeks. It turns out that when one eye is damaged, the other one also shuts down, from becoming photosympathetic (ultra-sensitive to light). I was blind for two weeks. No workie, no walkie, no nothing. There is no headache like that headache. Not even a migraine compares. So trust me. Use eye protection. I was lucky not to lose that eye, and my job (I was a truck driver). Now I use safety glasses (no holes!) AND a face shield. One rarely gets two second chances.
 

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Also, yes, be very sure to always use eye protection. It would be terribly ironic to have wasted all that effort fixing up a nice car that you can never drive again for the rest of your life after becoming legally blind. In my youth I built race cars, and I was up under one, late one night, with an angle grinder, working on frame clearances, and I WAS wearing goggles. Suddenly I felt a searing pain in my left eye. Had to stop immediately and roll out. Those goggles were the kind that had the soft clear side face flanges with vent holes to keep them from fogging. The pain kept increasing all night, and by morning my wife was not happy with me, as she had not slept either, and had to take the day off to drive me to the doctor, who sent me to a specialist. By the time I got there and in that doctor's office, it was 12 hours later, and I was ready for someone to shoot me, the pain was so intense. My wife had to lead me around - I could not see at all, could not open either eye. A 1-1/4" steel splinter had been driven vertically into my eye, blown through one of those tiny vent holes by the grinder. I passed out when they applied the anaesthetic. When I woke up, the headache was gone along with the pain, but only temporarily. Both my eyes were patched for two weeks. It turns out that when one eye is damaged, the other one also shuts down, from becoming photosympathetic (ultra-sensitive to light). I was blind for two weeks. No workie, no walkie, no nothing. There is no headache like that headache. Not even a migraine compares. So trust me. Use eye protection. I was lucky not to lose that eye, and my job (I was a truck driver). Now I use safety glasses (no holes!) AND a face shield. One rarely gets two second chances.
That's quite a story! Totally blind for two weeks? Like no peeking? I cannot imagine. It must have been pretty glorious when the patches came off to see again.

And that's a good point about the correct eye coverings for the job. I admit that most of the time, while mowing or trimming, I wear sunglasses. Not the best choice but it should keep a small stone out of my eye.

Angle grinder might be a full face shield with a respirator (if compatible).
 
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