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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I recently took my 2009 Honda CRV LX for the regular maintenance appointment (fluid changes) and they said I needed Brake fluid changed as well. I said okay why not. While waiting in the lounge for couple of hours I googled brake fluid and a lot of threads and youtube videos instruct to open the bleed valves on each tire.

When I received my vehicle i looked underneath the car at each tire (bleeder valve) and they were all bone dry with no indication of bleeder valve ever having loosened to bleed the air out the system.

Is this normal? I mean I would expect some sort of brake fluid residue somewhere near the calipers but like I said it was dry as if noone even removed the rubber cap off the bleeder valves, let alone crack opening the bleeder valve.

So my question is if the dealerships used either a high pressure extractor at the master cylinder and took all the old fluid out, or they simply took out some of the dirty brake fluid at the reservoir only and topped it up with some new brake fluid.

I feel like I have been ripped off but please share your knowledge how dealerships are suppose to change the brake fluid.
 

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I honestly don't know the answer to your question but I wouldn't hesitate to call the dealership and ask the service manager to tell me. Is it possible you had a 'good guy' tech do the work and he wiped everything dry after the work so it wouldn't possibly drip fluid on your brake pads and cause a squeak or anything worse?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I honestly don't know the answer to your question but I wouldn't hesitate to call the dealership and ask the service manager to tell me. Is it possible you had a 'good guy' tech do the work and he wiped everything dry after the work so it wouldn't possibly drip fluid on your brake pads and cause a squeak or anything worse?
Hard to find the 'good guys' these days but it is very possible. I will certainly check with them and let you know.
 

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2008 Honda CR-V EX-L FWD
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When I received my vehicle i looked underneath the car at each tire (bleeder valve) and they were all bone dry with no indication of bleeder valve ever having loosened to bleed the air out the system.

Is this normal? I mean I would expect some sort of brake fluid residue somewhere near the calipers but like I said it was dry as if noone even removed the rubber cap off the bleeder valves, let alone crack opening the bleeder valve.

So my question is if the dealerships used either a high pressure extractor at the master cylinder and took all the old fluid out, or they simply took out some of the dirty brake fluid at the reservoir only and topped it up with some new brake fluid.
I agree with you on finding a good reputable dealership to do work nowaday. Assuming that they did the brake bleed procedure at each wheels, how do you determine that the bleeder valve was never loosen? Did you check each bleeders right at the dealership or when you get home? You may have your brake done by a good mechanic that do a neat and tidy job of clean up afterward.

How I did my brake system flush are first, replace the fluid with the reservoir. Second, place the car on jack stand, remove all 4 wheels, and start bleeding at the RR, RL, FR, FL wheels in this specific orders. Top off the fluid at reservoir as it low. I use a pneumatic vacuum bleeder, so it does a good job with bleeding the fluid and not leave residue, and not introduce air back into the system.

Assuming you may have air in your brake system to begin with, if the dealer actually did the bleeding, then you should have a firmer brake pedal feel. Otherwise, chances are they may only change at the reservoir. Just my 2 cents.
 

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I use brake cleaner to clean up...well...everything after I'm done. If I bled the brakes, I'd be using brake cleaner to get the residue off before putting the wheels back on. Oil change? Hit the oil pan and anything else with a drop of oil on it with the brake cleaner. I don't like leaving a mess. If there's no "mess" left behind, that could be the sign of a tidy technician.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Did you check each bleeders right at the dealership or when you get home?.
I live about 3 miles from the dealership and right away I checked the bleeder valves by jacking up the vehicle. Trust me, the valves and the rubber coverings were dry and never been taken off. Had the rubber been taken off I could easily tell by seeing some dust been removed off the rubber covers. but there was no sign whatsoever in any 4 calipers.

The brakes did not feel any firmer than what it was prior to changing the brake fluid. they said based on the milage/history/time you need brake fluid changed so I gave it a go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I use brake cleaner to clean up...well...everything after I'm done. If I bled the brakes, I'd be using brake cleaner to get the residue off before putting the wheels back on. Oil change? Hit the oil pan and anything else with a drop of oil on it with the brake cleaner. I don't like leaving a mess. If there's no "mess" left behind, that could be the sign of a tidy technician.
I agree with you but even the brake cleaner would have cleaned out the dirt and dust off the calipers in/around the bleeder valves. But it did not...
 

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They may have sucked the fluid out of the master cylinder with a turkey baster-like device. But that doesn't do a thing for the fluid in the lines. To get that fluid out, they must open the bleeders (and the master cylinder) and suck the fluid out at the bleeders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
They may have sucked the fluid out of the master cylinder with a turkey baster-like device. But that doesn't do a thing for the fluid in the lines. To get that fluid out, they must open the bleeders (and the master cylinder) and suck the fluid out at the bleeders.
Right, and that is why I am thinking they never did it the proper way....
 

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2011 CR-V 4WD EX
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Using a pressure bleeder, bleed at each wheel would not necessarily leave the bleeder wet. No good way to tell, hard to find good service, hard to trust those people. A dip and replace would cost under $50, bled at each wheel might be over $100.
 

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Let me check mine. I haven't really driven it after the brake fluid replacement.

EDIT:

Seems pretty clean, the dust/dirt is gone but no fluid spill.

138993

138994
 

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I recently had the fluid replaced on my 2017. In reviewing the paperwork, the service did bleed the lines, and after replacing the fluid, performed a separate check to insure no leaks were detected post service, and performed a test drive to check braking performance and integrity.

I generally come from the school of thought that "you most often get what you pay for". If the service was less expensive than expected (and comparable for dealer service in your area, regardless of brand) ... you may have gotten a simple drain and replace, absent full bleed and leak testing. /shrug.
 

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Given that my car have a good braking system to begin with, I really can't tell any different in the braking feel after a full system bleed. Only thing I can tell is when brake pad are worn. Unless your braking system have air in them and/spongy brake feel, then a full bleed will make a difference in the braking feel.
 

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Given that my car have a good braking system to begin with, I really can't tell any different in the braking feel after a full system bleed. Only thing I can tell is when brake pad are worn. Unless your braking system have air in them and/spongy brake feel, then a full bleed will make a difference in the braking feel.
That's not the point. The idea is to get the old, moisturized fluid out and replaced by fresh one. This will save the caliper pistons from jamming due to rust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I generally come from the school of thought that "you most often get what you pay for". If the service was less expensive than expected (and comparable for dealer service in your area, regardless of brand) ... you may have gotten a simple drain and replace, absent full bleed and leak testing. /shrug.
I went to a Honda dealership.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That's not the point. The idea is to get the old, moisturized fluid out and replaced by fresh one. This will save the caliper pistons from jamming due to rust.
I do not have spongy brake pedal, nor is my brake fluid discolored. They still made me "replace" the brake fluid. Now I doubt weather they really did it or not.
 

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You don't change brake fluid because there's a problem. You change it to prevent problems, most commonly corrosion on piston surfaces which make the system lose air tightness and cause jammed pistons.

Brake fluid is extremely hygroscopic and suck in moisture from the environment, hence the frequent need for replacement. It's a very simple and ridiculouslyvcheap DYI job.
 
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The fluid is recommended to be changed every 3 years, it makes no difference if you can see, or are experiencing a problem.

They didn't "make" you change it, they recommended it and you said yes.

I would definitely ask them about whether they actually did the fluid change though.
 

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I live about 3 miles from the dealership and right away I checked the bleeder valves by jacking up the vehicle. Trust me, the valves and the rubber coverings were dry and never been taken off. Had the rubber been taken off I could easily tell by seeing some dust been removed off the rubber covers. but there was no sign whatsoever in any 4 calipers.

The brakes did not feel any firmer than what it was prior to changing the brake fluid. they said based on the milage/history/time you need brake fluid changed so I gave it a go.
I agree. No matter how fastidious they were cleaning up after the work was done you'd be able to tell that someone removed and replaced the rubber bleeder covers by hand.
 
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