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Can somebody please tell me how to drive my hybrid touring CR-V with maximum efficiency? I got the car to help save the environment with less gas emissions. But now I'm confused about how to do that as there are so many videos with fancy numbers about engines that I'm just lost in the weeds. I just need some clear guidance on how to drive.

For example, what speeds should I drive at to use more battery and less gas? When can/should I only use the battery? What is the best way of charging the battery (e.g., accelerating at certain speeds or decelerating)?
Thank you!
 

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Good choice of car. No special technique required other than what Dark Knight suggested. A roaring engine will tell you when it’s guzzling fuel and in a short space of time you’ll adapt to minimise those moments.

Eco mode is available but even in other modes the fuel return numbers are way better than WLTP figures.
 

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Can somebody please tell me how to drive my hybrid touring CR-V with maximum efficiency? […]

For example, what speeds should I drive at to use more battery and less gas? When can/should I only use the battery? What is the best way of charging the battery (e.g., accelerating at certain speeds or decelerating)?
Thank you!
To TheDarkKnight and Charlie1960’s points, driving efficiently works similarly in most vehicles. A few ideas to start:
  • Try using one of the instrument panel displays that provides more feedback to learn what does and doesn’t consume as much fuel. I find the weird car-in-a-circle thing (Eco Drive Display) unhelpful, but the simple current and trip consumption (Range & Fuel) and the current source(s) of power (Power Flow Monitor) options provide immediate information that can be useful. The power/charge display (at the top of the display) serves this function, too.
  • Holding speed to 50-65 miles per hour on the highway delivers surprisingly good fuel consumption. This isn’t always an option to avoid impeding traffic on U.S. Interstate highways, but on many non-interstate highways it’s not difficult.
  • Accelerate and brake smoothly. If every traffic signal feels like a panic stop followed by a race start, try doing the opposite.
 

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2020 CR-V hybrid Executive trim Premium Chrystal Red Metallic
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When you're cruising (speed < 65 mph/100 km/hr) you'll see the EV modus light come on from time to time. That's really great. When cruising in town, I tend to open the window and listen(...) to the total absence of engine noise. Nice. It's becoming a habit (addiction?) to try to (semi) coast as many miles possible in EV mode!

Something special: the first evening the car was on the drive, I took my youngest for a spin around the park adjacent to my house. An exactly 2km long trip I managed to drive the whole trip in EV mode. When I parked the car on the driven and turned off the engine, a cup, like an award, appeared on the display. My son: " Oh that's the first time you get an award instead of a speeding ticket!" And we didn't pay attention after that. Now, I realise that we've not seen the 'Award' again.

Any idea?
 
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Time for introspection. To paraphrase your son, what is your normal driving technique: "You got an award" or "You didn't get a speeding ticket"?
 

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For me, try to maintain the same (lowish*) speed, avoid sudden speed change (accelerate or decelerate), and leverage the momentum, avoiding complete stops.

This includes predicting traffic ahead and acting accordingly. For example, if you see the light ahead is turning yellow, try to time your deceleration so the light will turn green as soon as you arrive at the intersection, this can keep you from stopping. However, please do this while there are no cars behind you (he will for sure get frustrated, ask me how I learned this).

*I said lowish speed (while following the speed limit with common sense and respect to others sharing the road) because the drag is proportional to the square of the speed. Driving at 75mph has more than 30% of a drag than 65mph, despite its only 21% faster.
 

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Time for introspection. To paraphrase your son, what is your normal driving technique: "You got an award" or "You didn't get a speeding ticket"?
Reward. I'm not too keen on getting a ticket. Too expensive here: 6 mph too fast is US$ 121.00! > 18 mph is a visit to Traffic Court and >25 mph too fast is losing one's license + US$ 450.00 fine + mandatory coaching that you have to pay yourself: US$ 1200... Apart from that: the inventor of the speed cameras, Maurice Gatsonides, was a Dutch guy.

I'm sure you'll get the idea that I'm always close to the speed limit. Having said that, I've done numerous miles in the US (holidays and work) and my experience is that driving in the US is more relaxed than in Europe!
 

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A bad habit from years gone by that many people still hang on to is 'warming up the engine'. Because of the metals and lubricants in this 21st century, the days of starting your car (or motorcycle) and let it set and idle till it's warmed up are a waste of time and energy. Start the engine and (key word) gently drive away. Yes, you want to let all the drive components get warmed up before you start pushing their limits.
 

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Reward. I'm not too keen on getting a ticket. Too expensive here: 6 mph too fast is US$ 121.00! > 18 mph is a visit to Traffic Court and >25 mph too fast is losing one's license + US$ 450.00 fine + mandatory coaching that you have to pay yourself: US$ 1200... Apart from that: the inventor of the speed cameras, Maurice Gatsonides, was a Dutch guy.

I'm sure you'll get the idea that I'm always close to the speed limit. Having said that, I've done numerous miles in the US (holidays and work) and my experience is that driving in the US is more relaxed than in Europe!
In 2017, wife and I spent 3 weeks driving through DE, AT, SI, IT, CH & DE again as we visited relatives. Driving there was a unique, but overall enjoyable, experience. What I really appreciated was the lane discipline. Folks knew where to drive based on their traveling styles. i.e. fastest in left lane, average in the middle, trucks / heavy movers in the right.. Over here, it's not uncommon to have someone doing 100 KmH staying in the left lane, forcing others traveling @ 110KmH to weave and pass on the right.

Felt safer driving on the autobahn @ 140KmH than I do driving @ any speed on I-35 anywhere in TX.
 

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In 2017, wife and I spent 3 weeks driving through DE, AT, SI, IT, CH & DE again as we visited relatives. Driving there was a unique, but overall enjoyable, experience. What I really appreciated was the lane discipline. Folks knew where to drive based on their traveling styles. i.e. fastest in left lane, average in the middle, trucks / heavy movers in the right.. Over here, it's not uncommon to have someone doing 100 KmH staying in the left lane, forcing others traveling @ 110KmH to weave and pass on the right.
Your list is indeed a list of countries where there's 'lane discipline'. Italy (and France) have come from far when it comes to proper road manners. In Italy (e.g. on the A1 from Milan to Rome) there are three lanes. Left: for those who want to maintain the allowed top-speed of 130 km/hr, the middle lane is for 110 km/hr and the third (right) lane for 90 km/hr or less (big truck going uphill). And it works perfectly! Same goes for France, e.g. on the Autoroute Du Soleil: the French N-S route, east of Paris.

Back on topic: it's partly a mindset, I presume. I can floor the pedal and take the car up to 130 km/hr (- and I will do so in Germany with its unlimited speeds on certain roads) or you can choose to keep the speed more modest. Let's say 100 km/hr. Personally, I am chuffed when I see the EV light come on!
 
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A bad habit from years gone by that many people still hang on to is 'warming up the engine'. Because of the metals and lubricants in this 21st century, the days of starting your car (or motorcycle) and let it set and idle till it's warmed up are a waste of time and energy. Start the engine and (key word) gently drive away. Yes, you want to let all the drive components get warmed up before you start pushing their limits.
Here, it's not cold enough to experience it, but how are things in the northern USA or Can for that matter? Engine heater? Or?

During WWII, the UK fire brigade needed pumps with a powerful engine capable of delivering revs from the moment 'go'. Enter the Coventry Climax engine with its Lady Godiva logo. The engine's tolerances were rather 'wide' and it needed a lot of oil to keep it all lubricated. When Colin Chapman built his first Lotus cars in the 50s, he turned to the Coventry Climax engine for its (among others) free-revving capabilities. It only needed a lot of oil... A lot.

Modern engines like the Honda's have very narrow tolerances and the build quality is so good that stationary warming the engine has no use. I watched 'James May, Our Man In Japan' on Amazon Prime. Apart from 'recommended' he paid a visit to a Honda motorcycle plant. He had to undergo the same procedure as a surgeon in a hospital to make sure that there would be no debri or dust inside the engines!
 

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Can somebody please tell me how to drive my hybrid touring CR-V with maximum efficiency? I got the car to help save the environment with less gas emissions. But now I'm confused about how to do that as there are so many videos with fancy numbers about engines that I'm just lost in the weeds. I just need some clear guidance on how to drive.

For example, what speeds should I drive at to use more battery and less gas? When can/should I only use the battery? What is the best way of charging the battery (e.g., accelerating at certain speeds or decelerating)?
Thank you!
Just drive it. :) The vehicle is literally designed to take most of the guesswork out of driving for fuel economy. Let the vehicle worry about fuel economy. The only real options you have as a driver is some of the settings.. economy, sport, etc.

It is a hybrid.. and efficiency is always a zero-sum game in terms of energy efficiency in hybrids. The Honda Hybrids have very small batteries, which are more like a charging buffer than an actual battery you can propel the vehicle with. Honda my market some nominal EV type features in their hybrids.. but it is largely that... marketing hype lacking real substance.

Honda Hybrid FACTS, as of 2020:
1) Honda has deployed a hybrid approach across their product lines now days that optimizes for fuel economy... not EV style driving. Hondas use an extremely efficient Atkinson gas engines to generate the power to drive generators that in turn drive the electric drive motors. It is the higher efficiency of the Atkinson engine design approach compared to modern GDI engines that provides better fuel economy for miles driven. The addition of features to recovers some energy during braking and coasting also helps and is standard for pretty much all brands of hybrids.

2) Like all hybrids (not EVs... hybrids) Honda get better fuel economy in city driving (compared to GDI engines) and tend to do better in stop and go traffic as well... mainly due to energy recovery systems.

3) Hybrids are NOT going to provide much additional fuel economy on highway driving... because traditional GDI engines are already very efficient at steady state driving speeds.
 

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If you wanted to 'save the environment with less gas emissions' you should have thought about the environmental impact of the mining that went into the production of you disposable batteries.

It's a dual edged sword...

Best of luck to you!
Honda, historically is more "green aware and friendly" than many other vehicle manufacturers. I actually applaud Honda for their approach to hybrids in this regard as it further proves that their engineering teams actually "walk their talk".

Honda uses a very small drive battery, that is really a charging buffer if you pencil out the design on paper.. NOT an EV drive battery.

Not only does the Honda approach save weight.. which is a notable factor in fuel economy... the small battery also has a much smaller environmental footprint.. both in manufacture and in recycling.
 

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I'm surprised that no one mentioned the regenerative braking paddles (unless I missed it). I don't know how much difference they make in real gas mileage, but I find them an enjoyable game to play. I try to get just the right amount of regen to slow the car to allow me not to brake, but without slowing too much to impede traffic. My favorite part of this game is judging just when to start and how many of the three levels to use so that I can come around a corner with no braking. (Before someone asks: Three levels because it is always at one and as soon as you press the left paddle you are on two, so you have three choices though there are actually four levels.)
 

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I do use the regenerative braking paddles to brake most of the time
I leave the car in drive all the time but have tried sport once
but I don't really find the need for it as it is very quick when overtaking in drive
I haven't changed my style of driving since my last car which was a diesel

I average about 50mpg according to the average reading on the car but would say it is about 10% over and a true reading is about 45 uk mpg
which for a car the size of a CRV is good
 

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I drive an Accord Hybrid, but I don't think the advice should be that much different. But for reference:
139719

The 2018 HAH is rated at 47 mpg in all categories. And in my experience, the trip computer reads 1.5 to 2 mpg low.

The oldest trip, 100.2 miles @ 49.8 mpg, included a round-trip to babysit my grandson of 87 miles through the heart of Washington, DC. The next two were Interstate trips (Maryland to Virginia beach, then back) with a fully-loaded trunk, at 75 mph and 65 mph top speeds, respectively. The most recent was just the "to" babysitting trip, and one of my best totals.

I also have an opinion about the CR-V, that they needed to change the gear ratio because of the larger tires. My car is optimized for 54 mph; with the same drive train but bigger tires, yours is closer to 48 to 50 mph. I beleive that's why the CR-V doesn't match (or better) the RAV4.

Can somebody please tell me how to drive my hybrid touring CR-V with maximum efficiency?
Drive as you usually would to maximize efficiency. In particular, try to keep a steady speed. Too many people will oscilate between 5 mph over, and 5 mph under, their target speed. That is likely the biggest drain.

Next, ignore whether you are in EV mode or not. Let me repeat that: IGNORE EV MODE. Yes, you are not burning gas in EV mode, and that seems like it should be the goal. What you are doing, is using gas you burned at an earlier time, stored in the battery (after losing 5% to 10% doing so), and pulled back out (another 5% to 10% lost). It is the total cycle that saves gas, not the act of driving in EV mode. The engine is about 30% efficient when it only generates the power needed for cruisoing, but it is 40% efficient if it can generate at its most efficient power level. That's 1/3 more energy. If it only recovers 80% of that extra 1/3, that's still a 25% gain overall.

There are so many videos with fancy numbers about engines that I'm just lost in the weeds. I just need some clear guidance on how to drive.
For the most part, ignore the videos and just drive. The videos are aimed at Toyotas, which aren't as smart.

For example, what speeds should I drive at to use more battery and less gas?
That is an important factor, and I can't say how it applies to the CR-V. I start losing about 1 mpg for every 3 mph above about 65. All cars will lose as they go faster, although I think the Honda system is a little more sensitive to it.

When can/should I only use the battery? What is the best way of charging the battery (e.g., accelerating at certain speeds or decelerating)?
Don't try to manage it. The car's computer is better at it than you are.

Hybrids are NOT going to provide much additional fuel economy on highway driving... because traditional GDI engines are already very efficient at steady state driving speeds.
Actually, they do, by alternating between engine drive and EV drive. This is a process that Toyota drivers have to do manually, called "pulse and glide." They have to speed up and slow down to do it. Hondas do it by themselves at constant speed.
I'm surprised that no one mentioned the regenerative braking paddles (unless I missed it). I don't know how much difference they make in real gas mileage, but I find them an enjoyable game to play.
They actually don't save gas by themselves. They train you (the driver) to take advantage of the features of the car.

The car will always use regen brakes for as much of the slowing as it can. This will be more than cars with smaller electric motors can do (the braking power is literally the same as the driving power), but you don't have any control over it. What the paddles do, is let you regulate how much slowing is applied when coasting to slow down instead of using the brake pedal.

If you were to slow from 50 mph using the brake pedal, the car would choose regen brakes until the amount of pressure you apply to that pedal exceeds what regen can do. Then it will apply the friction brakes for the excess. If you use the paddles only, it won't go past that point. And you learn where it is, and how to anticipate it.
 

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I just need some clear guidance on how to drive.
As for driving efficiently, thats done by observing rules/speeds/regulations on the road and other general driving dynamics, as in, how hard you hit the gas pedal.
Noting that the OP wanted clear guidance I think Dark Knights simple advice hits the nail on the head.

Mode selection, paddle use and optimal speeds can be used to fine tune economy once the OP gains experience with the cars unique driving capabilities. I know that's how I worked it out for me.
 

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Actually, they do, by alternating between engine drive and EV drive. This is a process that Toyota drivers have to do manually, called "pulse and glide." They have to speed up and slow down to do it. Hondas do it by themselves at constant speed.
Hondas certainly do this automatically, and have to because of the extremely small battery. There is no other way to do it.

But you are incorrect about notable improvement in highway mpg on the hybrid.

GDI AWD 2020 fuel economy: Combined: 29 City: 27 Highway: 32
Hybrid AWD 2020 fuel economy: Combined: 38 City: 40 Highway: 35

+13 mpg for city +3 mpg for highway. Just like I stated.. the bulk of any fuel economy improvements comes from city driving improvements in fuel economy.

Again..... the bulk of the improvement in fuel economy on the hybrid Hondas comes from city driving.. just like every other hybrid ever. If anyone is looking for an actual cost benefit from hybrids... it is in the city mpg efficiency levels... NOT the highway mpg efficiency.

Hybrids are NOT particularly "green friendly" in highway driving. EVs may be (depending on how your wall electricity is generated ... but not hybrids. Hybrids excel at improving city driving fuel economy, and that is what drives the majority of the combined fuel economy results.
 
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