Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

Registered
Joined
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi Everybody,
Whilst driving my new CR-V Hybrid down a steepish hill, I utilised the regen paddle system to slow the car down.
However shortly after activating the regen system, the engine started to roar at high rpm!
I have since established through the internet that this happens when the HV battery SOC is full and power is therefore transferred from the Motor/Gen to the MG2 which spins the engine block up to create resistance.
My concern is whether the engine, which hasn鈥檛 completed the breaking in period, been damaged by the high revving 馃檨!
Apparently the engine is technically off I.e no fuel or spark but still running at very high revs for 1 to 2 mins!
I guess the speed of the MG2 is governed by a computer to stop it over revving but does anybody know what that limit is?
Thanks in advance
Dave
 

Super Moderator
2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
Joined
3,608 Posts
I certainly hope it doesn't "spin the engine block up", might be hard on motor mounts. :)
But I knew what you meant.
I don't know what the limit you refer to is, but I have to assume the car won't damage itself.
The "breaking in period" may be a dated concept from the days when they used non-detergent "break-in oil" from the factory, but it still can't hurt to be careful at first.
I think at least some of that "roar" is artificial BTW.

Oh, welcome to the forum here. More and more hybrid and UK drivers all the time. I hope you find it useful.
 

Registered
Joined
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi beww,
Thank you for your welcome and reply馃憤.
I guess/hope Honda would give precautionary advise if the conditions I mentioned could damage the engine.
I don鈥檛 know whether you have experienced that engine roar but it鈥檚 certainly unsettling!
btw, who put 鈥榖lock鈥 in there 馃槈
Looking forward to future discussions.
Cheers Dave 馃憤
 

Super Moderator
2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
Joined
3,608 Posts
I have indeed heard it, usually at what seems like an inappropriate time.
But we have to remember that unless the OD clutch is closed, engine RPM has nothing to do with wheel rotation speed.
You expect a roar when accelerating at high speed, not when slowing down I guess.
 
  • Like
Reactions: williamsji

Super Moderator
2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
Joined
6,956 Posts
Hello and welcome to the forum DaiWil. :)

Hi Everybody,
Whilst driving my new CR-V Hybrid down a steepish hill, I utilised the regen paddle system to slow the car down.
However shortly after activating the regen system, the engine started to roar at high rpm!
I have since established through the internet that this happens when the HV battery SOC is full and power is therefore transferred from the Motor/Gen to the MG2 which spins the engine block up to create resistance.
My concern is whether the engine, which hasn鈥檛 completed the breaking in period, been damaged by the high revving 馃檨!
Apparently the engine is technically off I.e no fuel or spark but still running at very high revs for 1 to 2 mins!
I guess the speed of the MG2 is governed by a computer to stop it over revving but does anybody know what that limit is?
Thanks in advance
Dave
There is no real "break in period" for modern consumer motor vehicles, except for maybe some of the high end exotics. These modern engines are ready to go right from the factory.

You may not achieve peak fuel economy for a few thousand miles as the engine "matures" and all the control systems dial in fuel economy variables based on tracking your driving habits.. but that is about it.

There also is no such thing as factory break-in oil in Hondas. They put stock OEM oil in at the factories, and the only thing atypical of future oil changes is there will be some lubricants present from engine assembly that will test positive if you had the first oil analyzed by an oil analysis company. But these are normal for Hondas, and nothing to be alarmed about.

The iMMD hybrids system is fully automated and controlled by the vehicle control systems. Anything it does... is normal.. unless there is a system failure somewhere. Honestly, in observing the hybrid subforum here since the hybrids launched in North America... it seems that hybrid owners fret and worry over every little noise or behavior they do not understand. :)

Suggestion: drive your CRV, enjoy your CRV, and trust Honda engineering. (y) If you have any actual issues early on.. your factory warranty will take care of that for you. Besides.. these modern CRVs have a large basket of sensors and software that watches, checks, and cross checks systems... and are prone to alert early and alert often if there is actually any issue with the function of the vehicle.. and this is particularly true for the power trains. Honda engineering is also quite conservative, which is why they have such a long and rich tradition of reliable long life power trains in most cases (setting aside the occasional turkey model/year that ever brand can and does experience... and there is no evidence that Honda iMMD systems are turkeys). They are actually quite refined and innovative in how they approach hybrid drive.
 

Registered
2020 Touring Hybrid
Joined
812 Posts
Hello and welcome to the forum DaiWil. :)



There is no real "break in period" for modern consumer motor vehicles, except for maybe some of the high end exotics. These modern engines are ready to go right from the factory.
Not just high end exotics鈥.some pretty moderate priced sport sedans have specified engine break-in requirements鈥.I won鈥檛 give examples out of respect for DarkKnight. 馃槈
 

Super Moderator
2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
Joined
6,956 Posts
Not just high end exotics鈥.some pretty moderate priced sport sedans have specified engine break-in requirements鈥.I won鈥檛 give examples out of respect for DarkKnight. 馃槈
hehe.. I'll go ahead and toss a soft ball here for TheDarkKnight to hit out of the park. :p

Let me guess.... it's zee Germans again.. right? :p

Given all the strange things BMW, et al, puts in their vehicles... I consider them exotic ... as in more complex than they actually need to be. :) I have often thought that German vehicle engineers actually think the shortest path between two points is a zig-zag, rather than a straight line. :ROFLMAO:
 

Registered
2020 Touring Hybrid
Joined
812 Posts
hehe.. I'll go ahead and toss a soft ball here for TheDarkKnight to hit out of the park. :p

Let me guess.... it's zee Germans again.. right? :p

Given all the strange things BMW, et al, puts in their vehicles... I consider them exotic ... as in more complex than they actually need to be. :) I have often thought that German vehicle engineers actually think the shortest path between two points is a zig-zag, rather than a straight line. :ROFLMAO:
And Italians鈥.

Even Mazda has some recommendations on first 600 miles.
 

Super Moderator
2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
Joined
6,956 Posts
And Italians鈥.

Even Mazda has some recommendations on first 600 miles.
I don't know about the Italian brands, but in Mazda's case, they offer the same guidance as most other Japanese brands, all of which are actually long standing common sense driving of a brand new vehicle in my view:

From the CX30 owners manual :
No special break-in is necessary, but a few precautions in the first 1,000 km (600 miles) may add to the performance, economy, and life of the vehicle.
  • Do not race the engine.
  • Do not maintain one constant speed, either slow or fast, for a long period of time.
  • Do not drive constantly at full-throttle or high engine rpm for extended periods of time.
  • Avoid unnecessary hard stops.
  • Avoid full-throttle starts.
Basically the Mazda guidance is to avoid the extreme performance corners on your power train until everything seats in nice and tidy, which I view as common sense for owners... but... yeah.. not all vehicle owners are rich in common sense. So it worth documenting in a manual that they also probably will never read either. :p
 

Registered
Joined
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hello and welcome to the forum DaiWil. :)

There is no real "break in period" for modern consumer motor vehicles, except for maybe some of the high end exotics. These modern engines are ready to go right from the factory.

You may not achieve peak fuel economy for a few thousand miles as the engine "matures" and all the control systems dial in fuel economy variables based on tracking your driving habits.. but that is about it.

There also is no such thing as factory break-in oil in Hondas. They put stock OEM oil in at the factories, and the only thing atypical of future oil changes is there will be some lubricants present from engine assembly that will test positive if you had the first oil analyzed by an oil analysis company. But these are normal for Hondas, and nothing to be alarmed about.

The iMMD hybrids system is fully automated and controlled by the vehicle control systems. Anything it does... is normal.. unless there is a system failure somewhere. Honestly, in observing the hybrid subforum here since the hybrids launched in North America... it seems that hybrid owners fret and worry over every little noise or behavior they do not understand. :)

Suggestion: drive your CRV, enjoy your CRV, and trust Honda engineering. (y) If you have any actual issues early on.. your factory warranty will take care of that for you. Besides.. these modern CRVs have a large basket of sensors and software that watches, checks, and cross checks systems... and are prone to alert early and alert often if there is actually any issue with the function of the vehicle.. and this is particularly true for the power trains. Honda engineering is also quite conservative, which is why they have such a long and rich tradition of reliable long life power trains in most cases (setting aside the occasional turkey model/year that ever brand can and does experience... and there is no evidence that Honda iMMD systems are turkeys). They are actually quite refined and innovative in how they approach hybrid drive.
Hi Williamsji,
Thank you for your welcome and detailed comments. Everything both you and beww have said makes sense. I guess Honda are not going to make a self destructing car. I just worry too much! Enjoy your weekend and hopefully speak again soon. Cheers Dave馃憤
 

Registered
2022 CRV EX-L AWD Hybrid in Obsidian Blue
Joined
5 Posts
I haven't seen this behavior [yet] in our 2022 Hybrid. Though we've only owned it for a couple of weeks. Does it only happen when using the regen braking option, will it not rev the engine if the regen is not used?
 

Super Moderator
2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
Joined
3,608 Posts
I haven't seen this behavior [yet] in our 2022 Hybrid. Though we've only owned it for a couple of weeks. Does it only happen when using the regen braking option, will it not rev the engine if the regen is not used?
A better question might be will it rev the engine if the paddles are not used? The general answer would be no.
Regen braking is always used, whether invoked with a paddle or the pedal.
The paddle allows you to invoke "regen only" braking.
The energy recovered by regeneration is stored in the HV battery.
If the HV battery gets full, the system reverts to "engine braking", which will turn the engine, but not "run" it. It won't use the friction brakes unless you use the pedal (CMB notwithstanding).
The system will try to prevent the HV battery being in a "full" condition by running in EV mode, even at highway speed. The full condition is generally encountered only when descending long grades.
But it gets even more complicated of course. The system may run the ICE for cabin heat only, making the engine's braking performance very different, for example.
I paid close attention to all these things when I first got the car. Now I just drive it. It's simpler that way.
 
  • Like
Reactions: EXcommunicated
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top