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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went to my '17 Turbo this morning to start it up. The car hadn't been started for about 10 days. The cabin light came on went I opened the door, but when I hit the start button the entire console lit up and it didn't start. I tried a couple of times. Nothing. But the cabin light came back on when I opened the door. I know I've read something about this in the past, but couldn't quite find the exact thread(s). I will check the battery when I get home, but is this the most likely issue? I wasn't sure if this behavior had been associated with more serious problem.
 

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Based on the description of symptoms...I would be extremely surprised if the battery is not bad.. or severely discharged.

Note: either way.. if it were me.. I would replace it. I never trust a starter battery that has been depleted at least once.. even if it tests good after recharging.
 

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I too would recommend a battery replacement. It's clear that Honda batteries are not super long-lasting so it's probably time. I also have a 2017 and wonder just how long it will be before I'm in the same situation as you :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just ordered a charger to see if it can be recharged enough for me to get it started. I have a DMM also at home so at least I can check the voltage and resistance. I hope it is the battery and nothing worse. I'll have to check the threads and see what a better replacement battery would be for the '17. Although I'm still in my 3/36K period so maybe for this one I'll have Honda replace it.
 

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this was the first and last time we had that issue


you can take the bat, disconnect, and get that charged, and then try, keep an eye on it. electrolytes settled, water evaporated, never know not going to sit and write a Billion word topic and be Crypted about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dead battery. 5.25 VDC. A NOCO Genius5 should be here by 6 PM. I’ll set it up and see what happens. If I can get it to recharge I’ll be bringing the vehicle to Honda to get the battery drain TSB done, and see if I can get one of those newer issue higher capacity Honda batteries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
An enthusiastic thumbs up for the NOCO. The green indicator light was flashing this morning. Not fully charged, but charged enough to give the car a test crank. Started right up.
 
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glad 2 hear endjoy.
 

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An enthusiastic thumbs up for the NOCO. The green indicator light was flashing this morning. Not fully charged, but charged enough to give the car a test crank. Started right up.
(y)

When you plan being parked at home for a few days.... be sure and let the NOCO do it's magic of a full initial charge cycle until the green 100% indicator goes solid (ie: fully charged, on standby monitoring). That will insure the NOCO had a chance to do a full and complete conditioning charge cycle.

Be sure and pop the square caps off the battery and inspect fluid levels too. If the electrolyte is low.. top it up with distilled water (careful not to over fill... so a little at a time until the level is correct). low electrolyte is, I believe, the most common killer of modern batteries. Too many years of "maintenance free battery" propaganda in the industry in my view as these flooded cell batteries are NOT maintenance free.
 

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Its definitely time for 17 owners to be proactive and replace their batteries before they fail. When batteries go, it tends to be a slow start one day then a few hours later nothing.
 
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Its definitely time for 17 owners to be proactive and replace their batteries before they fail. When batteries go, it tends to be a slow start one day then a few hours later nothing.
(y) (y)

'17 owners definitely need to be keeping an eye on their battery integrity, if not replace as a pre-emptive action. Every owner of every vehicle today should assume their battery may be marginal.. at 3 years of age. Batteries can fail sooner of course due to some defect or repeated discharges, and batteries can last well beyond 3 years if properly maintained, but 3 years is a great point to raise your level of suspicion of battery integrity.

While high CCA is overkill for the small engines in CRVs.. measured CCA is a great indicator of battery health.. as is battery impedance (they go hand in hand). I keep a close eye on my monthly CCA test results when I run my battery integrity scan. Normally on a good battery CCA will read above spec... often 20-30% above spec. As soon as my monthly testing shows CCA results go below 90% of spec, or I start to see a measurable rise in the battery impedance test ... the battery gets replaced.
 

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has anyone ever thought about adding in not distilled water.
 

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has anyone ever thought about adding in not distilled water.
While doing so for a small amount one time is probably not a huge issue (depends on the water quality) ... non-distilled water has various chemicals in it and most of them will actually act to neutralize the acid in the electrolyte. Tap water that reads out as "hard" in a chemical assessment would be particularly problematic. A tiny bit would probably be no problem, but should still be avoided at all costs.

Chemistry inside a battery is already the main weak point in many cases.. so best not to further weaken it. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I keep a close eye on my monthly CCA test results when I run my battery integrity scan. Normally on a good battery CCA will read above spec... often 20-30% above spec. As soon as my monthly testing shows CCA results go below 90% of spec, or I start to see a measurable rise in the battery impedance test ... the battery gets replaced.
I may have bought a battery tester that is a little too simple. I bought the TOPDON off Amazon as it had a smaller percentage of negative reviews. It works fine, but seems to be based on the simpler “R/Y/G” paradigm rather than an all out quantitative assessment paradigm. It does read back the internal resistance, but doesn’t seem to provide any measurable assessment against the CCA value.
 

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I did not say add water
While doing so for a small amount one time is probably not a huge issue (depends on the water quality) ... non-distilled water has various chemicals in it and most of them will actually act to neutralize the acid in the electrolyte. Tap water that reads out as "hard" in a chemical assessment would be particularly problematic. A tiny bit would probably be no problem, but should still be avoided at all costs.

Chemistry inside a battery is already the main weak point in many cases.. so best not to further weaken it. :)
As I said not distilled water.

have you ever thought of adding in electrolytes the acids to water. bring back the battery,
 

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The ‘yota I traded in on this’17 crv was 12 years old and had the original battery. My truck is 8 years old. Original battery. Never once, checked water level in either vehicle. I’ll be disappointed if this crv battery doesn’t last me at least 5 years.
 

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I did not say add water

As I said not distilled water.

have you ever thought of adding in electrolytes the acids to water. bring back the battery,
So.. if I understand you correctly, you meant add some actual electrolyte?

I personally would not.. unless/until I actually checked the electrolyte with a hydrometer. Adding more electrolyte without checking the existing electrolyte integrity could give as bad a result as adding tap water.. for the exact same reasons.. just a reverse chemical result.

Generally speaking, most of the allegedly "maintenance free" flooded cell batteries do not normally leak any electrolyte out of the top. Easy to confirm though.. as you will see presence of acid residue on the top of the battery and/or the posts.

Note: if you did have any acid residue on the top of the battery, THAT can provide a parasitic leak between cells in the battery (because electrolyte is conductive) .. so it is always prudent to properly clean up any residue if you find it.

Hydrometers are inexpensive, and prudent to use to test electrolyte before adding anything other than distilled water.
 

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then by all means leave itto the Professionals than trying to break it down to a issue or more. Time for a Cyber Beer or better yet. Jack..
 

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I may have bought a battery tester that is a little too simple. I bought the TOPDON off Amazon as it had a smaller percentage of negative reviews. It works fine, but seems to be based on the simpler “R/Y/G” paradigm rather than an all out quantitative assessment paradigm. It does read back the internal resistance, but doesn’t seem to provide any measurable assessment against the CCA value.
In my experience, most of the modern battery testers all operate similarly.. and probably are essentially the same circuitry internally and just packaged and branded differently for the most part.

Which TOPDON did you purchase? I ask, because had I went with TOPDON.. this is the one I would have chosen and it does include a CCA test, as well as all the other important tests. The only soft spot feature wise is that it appears to only tells you if ripple voltage on the charge test is "normal" or not... whereas Ancel units actually tell you the ripple voltage. I also do not see where it gives you an actual readout of internal resistance... instead.. again only showing "normal" or not. I prefer a unit that presents me with the actual data... but.. a normal reading means nothing to worry about for the average user.

by the way... the SOH (state of health) metrics in all of these testers is bogus.... because they are arbitrary (no standard exists for starter battery SOH)... but since they still disclose all the test results.. I just ignore SOH entirely. As long as CCA is above spec for the particular battery, and internal resistance remains stable and constant... a battery is generally in a good state of health. State of Charge (SOC) is also a bit arbitrary as there is some variation in the industry as to what equals 100% state of charge. But again.. most batteries will not test at 100% SOC unless you just parked after a long drive.. so SOC is information.. that by definition will be within some range.
 
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