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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm surprised Honda hasn't posted this bulletin for their customers. For those of us whose car is slow to warm up or is suffering the no heat problem, try this trick. Don't bother warming up your car. The 1.5L is very very very slow to warm up. Don't ask me how I know. Instead, right after starting your car, put it in L and start driving. While driving, remember to keep your RPM at least 3000-4000, the closer to the red line the better. Keep this up until your temperature needle is in the middle of the gauge. Then drive normally afterward.

Let me know if this trick helps you and don't forget to give me thanks. :)
 

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Over revving an ice cold engine everyday... sounds like a good idea. Wonder why honda didn’t just come up with this.
 

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That's a terrible idea. Most engine wear occurs when the engine is stone-cold. You do *not* want to be running it near redline continuously at that time.
 

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I'm surprised Honda hasn't post this bulletin for their customers. For those of us whose car is slow to warm up or is suffering the heat problem, try this trick. Don't bother warming up your car. The 1.5L is very very very slow to warm up. Don't ask me how I know. Instead, right after starting your car, put it in L and start driving. While driving, remember to keep your RPM at least 3000-4000, the closer to the red line the better. Keep this up until your temperature needle is in the middle of the gauge. Then drive normally afterward.

Let me know if this trick helps you and don't forget to give me thanks. :)
This is the way to sharply decrease the life of the engine.
 

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What about start the engine and let it sit there for a few minutes idling in gear with the parking brake set?
 

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I'm surprised Honda hasn't posted this bulletin for their customers. For those of us whose car is slow to warm up or is suffering the no heat problem, try this trick. Don't bother warming up your car. The 1.5L is very very very slow to warm up. Don't ask me how I know. Instead, right after starting your car, put it in L and start driving. While driving, remember to keep your RPM at least 3000-4000, the closer to the red line the better. Keep this up until your temperature needle is in the middle of the gauge. Then drive normally afterward.

Let me know if this trick helps you and don't forget to give me thanks. :)
This was a piece of horrible advice given by Robbyg in another thread.

He suggested revving the engine to 4000 RPM as soon as you start up the car and drive.
 

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I'm surprised Honda hasn't posted this bulletin for their customers. For those of us whose car is slow to warm up or is suffering the no heat problem, try this trick. Don't bother warming up your car. The 1.5L is very very very slow to warm up. Don't ask me how I know. Instead, right after starting your car, put it in L and start driving. While driving, remember to keep your RPM at least 3000-4000, the closer to the red line the better. Keep this up until your temperature needle is in the middle of the gauge. Then drive normally afterward.

Let me know if this trick helps you and don't forget to give me thanks. :)
LOL- first rule is never rev your engine up until it reaches normal operating temperature.
 

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LOL- first rule is never rev your engine up until it reaches normal operating temperature.
There's at least two good reasons for keeping engine speed low until operating temperature has been reached. Oil flows quicker and better to the furthest away lubrication sites in the engine at warmer temperatures. Piston to cylinder wall clearances will be at their minimum value when cold which accelerates engine wear.
 

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I'm surprised Honda hasn't posted this bulletin for their customers. For those of us whose car is slow to warm up or is suffering the no heat problem, try this trick. Don't bother warming up your car. The 1.5L is very very very slow to warm up. Don't ask me how I know. Instead, right after starting your car, put it in L and start driving. While driving, remember to keep your RPM at least 3000-4000, the closer to the red line the better. Keep this up until your temperature needle is in the middle of the gauge. Then drive normally afterward.

Let me know if this trick helps you and don't forget to give me thanks. :)
I have found that starting a small fire just beneath the engine about 15 minutes before departing works equally well.:kaboom
 

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I'm surprised Honda hasn't posted this bulletin for their customers. For those of us whose car is slow to warm up or is suffering the no heat problem, try this trick. Don't bother warming up your car. The 1.5L is very very very slow to warm up. Don't ask me how I know. Instead, right after starting your car, put it in L and start driving. While driving, remember to keep your RPM at least 3000-4000, the closer to the red line the better. Keep this up until your temperature needle is in the middle of the gauge. Then drive normally afterward.

Let me know if this trick helps you and don't forget to give me thanks. <img src="http://www.crvownersclub.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.png" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" />
I have found that starting a small fire just beneath the engine about 15 minutes before departing works equally well.<img src="http://www.triumphrat.net/images/smilies/headexplody.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Head Explody" class="inlineimg" />
I just connect one of my welders across the block and let the current warm it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have found that starting a small fire just beneath the engine about 15 minutes before departing works equally well.:kaboom
eh you know that back in WWII, the Germans fighting in Russia during the brutal Russian winter lit up fires underneath their vehicles' oil pan to help them start, right? So your suggestion might not be farfetched.
 

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I'm surprised Honda hasn't posted this bulletin for their customers. For those of us whose car is slow to warm up or is suffering the no heat problem, try this trick. Don't bother warming up your car. The 1.5L is very very very slow to warm up. Don't ask me how I know. Instead, right after starting your car, put it in L and start driving. While driving, remember to keep your RPM at least 3000-4000, the closer to the red line the better. Keep this up until your temperature needle is in the middle of the gauge. Then drive normally afterward.

Let me know if this trick helps you and don't forget to give me thanks. :)
I don't think many of us will fall for the joke. If you really thinks its a good idea to do that you need to do some reading on how engines work
 

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The factory set that red line engine speed on the conservative side too. You should be able to tach it well over the red line with no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
There's at least two good reasons for keeping engine speed low until operating temperature has been reached. Oil flows quicker and better to the furthest away lubrication sites in the engine at warmer temperatures. Piston to cylinder wall clearances will be at their minimum value when cold which accelerates engine wear.
Babying your car will only contribute to the problem. You're old school.
 

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Babying your car will only contribute to the problem. You're old school.
You should neither sit at idle forever nor rev it to redline soon after starting the car. The correct answer is: "Crank the car and drive like a normal person until the engine's warmed up." Even 0W oil is *far* thicker at cold startup than at operating temp. At least wait until you get a twitch from the temp needle before revving the engine high on-purpose.
 

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You should neither sit at idle forever nor rev it to redline soon after starting the car. The correct answer is: "Crank the car and drive like a normal person until the engine's warmed up." Even 0W oil is *far* thicker at cold startup than at operating temp. At least wait until you get a twitch from the temp needle before revving the engine high on-purpose.
Agree - personally I think many of us are overthinking this to the point where driving no longer becomes enjoyable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks all for your opinions. This was the advice given by robbyg and I just wanted to show how ridiculous his advice was. Like you said, "It's your car, not his".
 

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Time to throw a monkey wrench in.

For 25 years now I've worked in the Engine Engineering department for a large multi-team NASCAR racing company. We have built R&D race engines from new components with the purpose of testing maximum power under different conditions and we always achieve the highest torque and horsepower with a cold engine that has never been run before. Test parameters are: new engine with pre-heated oil in the system, cold coolant, and oil pressure established; start the engine and immediately to 9000 RPM at full load.
 
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