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Im looking to upgrade my Intake, I just want a couple suggestions or tips on doing this. Really I just want to teach myself how to work on my car(s). If I gain some HP and MPG on the way that would be good to. I have the space and tools, now I just need a bit of know how. So far other than the Intake I am considering replacing the exhaust manifold and porting the throttle. ANy suggestions?
 

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What year crv? There are decent options for all the engines used in the crv since they are also used in the civics of corresponding generations. Though there may be some fitment issues with your factory filter box depending on what you choose to go with.
 

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Agreed. Too many options to list a few generic suggestions. But simply from an intake upgrade you're not going to see any MPG gains from typical bolt-ons. Now that being said simple bolt-ons when mixed with other more extensive mods can yield some good gains. I had 2.5in catback exhaust, smoothed intake runners, and cold air intake. Those didn't yield any MPG gain but, when I added the MSD box and coil and went from 15,000 volts to 45,000 volts through multiple sparks I did see a great improvement of almost 5-6 MPG. But with just the ignition alone you might not see the same, even with the same mods I had. Many condition and variables affect the gas mileage.

Chris
 

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It all depends on your goals. The thing with a crv is using it in its intended form requires low/mid torque. Any aftermarket intake manifold won't gain in that area and could possibly lose torque in that area.

I would suggest keeping the stock manifold, put on a header, cold air intake, bigger throttle body and a catback exhaust. Those will help compliment the current powerband rather than change it. You will need to port match the intake manifold to the new throttle body.
 

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It all depends on your goals. The thing with a crv is using it in its intended form requires low/mid torque. Any aftermarket intake manifold won't gain in that area and could possibly lose torque in that area.

I would suggest keeping the stock manifold, put on a header, cold air intake, bigger throttle body and a catback exhaust. Those will help compliment the current powerband rather than change it. You will need to port match the intake manifold to the new throttle body.
I'm trying to understand this.. is manifold and header the same thing??

About the bigger throttle body, which one are you referring to? What car has it that will fit?

Could you point me to right direction on catback exhaust?

Thanks
 

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Lionheart1980, the manifold is the part that lets the car breathe, suck in the air, its the part connected to your air filter. The headers are for exhaust gases and is the part connected to your exhaust pipe. The throttle body is the valve that allow more or less into the manifold, the larger the size the better, but it has to be matched to your manifold, otherwise it will make no positive effect on your car. In regards to throttle body, there are companies that make great aftermarket parts such as Skunk2 and Edelbrock. For a catback exhaust, Yonaka makes a catback for the first gen CRV that is very popular.
 

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Lionheart, an engine has at least 2 manifolds on it. It has an intake manifold, and an exhaust manifold. Headers would replace the exhaust manifold.

If I was putting headers on, I'd put on "Tri-Y" headers. A CRV doesn't really start to put out any power until 3K rpm and regular headers would make it worse.

You might be able to find what you want here http://www.purehonda.com/cool/header.html#DCS

Here is why I say that about Tri-Y's http://www.superstreetonline.com/ho...804-honda-header-tri-y-vs-4-into-1-dyno-test/


Now, about the cat-back...IMHO....you'll only mostly get a better sound...in the usable rpm range. If you can handle that, keep the stock cat, stock resonator, stock everything, but get rid of the muffler, and replace it w/pipe of the same diameter. The small diameter pipe (when compared against a larger cat-back system) will keep your exhaust velocity up (what most, un-knowing, people mean when they say that you need back-pressure in an exhaust). I will also be cheap. If the noise is a problem....which I doubt, (a cat makes a fairly good performance muffler, and is about like a glass-pack) then add a resonator or small flow-thru muffler, this should tone it done quite a bit.
 

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Dique - I understand, thanks for the explanation again. :) Um, i understand there's an aftermarket throttle body for them, is there any non aftermarket throttle body like use the other honda motor of different hondas would fit on my B20Z motor? Only aftermarket will do? Now about the exhaust, when you say Yonka make the best catback exhaust.. do you leave all the other stock cat, stock restonator on? or do you change the whole thing?

Stinky - Hmm interesting links you posted there. Yea i can see the differences there.. About the exhaust, i can tell the cat on my crv isn't the original one.. seem cheap slapped on smaller cat on it.. but all other part are original thou. Did you mean it best to leave the muffler out, just a straight pipe thru the back? Is back pressure needed or not? I thought back pressure are needed for good performances?
 

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Depending on the cat that is on there, there could be gains made w/a high flow cat.

Yes, leave the muffler out. It will be comparable to a non=cat car that has glass packs on it. I had a station wagon and w/its long exhaust pipe, my wife didn't even notice. Back before cat=backs were common, this was a more common mod. It is a cheap alternative to spending big-bucks for and exhaust system that will mostly just sound cool (yes, it will probably accelerate better than stock, but how will it run at 3,500 rpm on the freeway).

Back pressure is not needed, in fact it works against you. Exhaust pipe works like a garden hose when it is being used to drain a water-bed. The column of gas has a scavenging affect in that the gas' high velocity, from the cylinders that fired a few sparks ago, sucks out the exhaust gas from the cylinder whose exhaust valve just opened. Then, the velocity of the "air" in the exhaust column starts pulling the air in, through the intake valve, before the piston starts going down and sucking in the air. Most people say back-pressure, but you need exhaust gas velocity, that comes from smaller pipes (as a side-point, on a 350 Chevy, generally speaking, for an all around motor, you want long smaller tubes on headers, for an rpm motor, you want bigger shorter tubes on the primaries, and for a dragster, you want short fat exhaust, all of them have high exhaust velocity at their target rpm). This brings up something quite important...in order for your motor to run "Right" all of your mods have to work together. If your exhaust doesn't match your intake it won't run up to its potential.

Just wondering, if you go to a cat-back exhaust system w/a larger pipe, what is it gonna do to your back-pressure? Most people don't know how fast their car is and they don't know what sort of gas mileage that it gets (All that they know is that they can drive to work all week long on a tank of gas).

Also, pipe diameter affects noise. I once put a 2" exhaust from the muffler back, on my Astro van, and my wife complained.

It is gonna be loader, but how much? My guess is that it will be like my '80 Toy 4x4...When I got it, it had headers and a glass pack and then the exhaust turned down to the ground, right under the cab. Now that was loud!!! I added exhaust all the way out the back, and it was considerably toned down and was just about right. Get you a saw's all ($20 at Harbor Fright), then cut off the muffler, or drop the exhaust and use a hack-saw. Run it and see what it is like. Try it out, keeping in mind that if the sound is taken all the way out the back, it will be quieter. If it is to loud, then get a resonator and add it to the end of the tail-pipe. BTW, all this is based on you having access to a welder, or a friend that welds....although any muffler shop would be happy to do the mods for you....you just don't want to have them weld on a pipe, and then pay them to cut it off in order to weld in a resonator. You may be able to use clamps...I like to weld my stuff in place. But, clamps work just fine.

Based on the picture, this has a resonator, in the center, just like stock, and another resonator at the end. You might also try a turbo muffler in place of the stock muffler. The big question...how load is it gonna be.

http://www.yonaka.com/Yonaka_1996_2001_Honda_CR_V_Catback_Exhaust_p/ymcb-crv9601.htm
 
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