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I just passed the 30,000 mile mark on my '17 CR-V EX-L and while looking over the engine compartment I noticed that the positive battery terminal had a lot of corrosion around it.

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Would you considered this to be an excessive amount of corrosion?

Should I ask my dealer to clean up the battery terminal? Or is this normal for Honda's and should I clean the terminal myself?

The battery is performing well. I don't have any aftermarket parts on the vehicle that draw power from the battery nor do I utilize the car's 12v power outlets; I mention this because I read that adding electronics that draw power off the battery can lead to battery terminal corrosion. I've also read that if corrosion builds on the positive terminal, it is likely because the vehicle is overcharging the battery. Is there any truth to this?

Meanwhile, the negative terminal is clear of any corrosion.
 

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I would think the seal between the battery case and the positive terminal is compromised allowing leakage around the positive post. Remove the clamp, clean the corrosion very carefully and apply Vaseline or grease around the clean post and clamp. Check it frequently as it will probably continue to corrode, presuming it is leaking around the post.
 

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Normally you would not be seeing that much corrosion on a battery at that age. As was mentioned, there is likely some acid seepage around t he post. Its not the end of the world however. I would clean the post myself. You can use a small wire brush or even steel wool. Remove the negative battery post first and move it aside so there is no way it can touch the negative post. Next remove the positive post. Clean the post on the battery and the clamp using a small wire brush or fine sand paper. Wipe it off well when done. Also, this is important, clean the entire top and case of the battery. This is very easy to do. Using normal baking soda mix up paste with water. Brush this onto the top of the battery, an old paint brush or tooth brush works well. Use this same mixture on the battery posts and their clamps. It will likely foam up, that is normal and shows its doing its job neutralizing the battery acid. Keep cleaning until the foaming stops. Now, using lots of clean fresh water rinse all of this off. (Do this outside and make sure to wash all this run-off away so it doesn't hurt the drive way). Once you have the battery all nice and clean wipe it down with a clean rag and put the cables back on. Put the Pos. (+) cable on first. Lastly put the Neg. (-) cable back on. Some like to coat the attached cleaned cables with some Vaseline or grease as this will help keep the acid off the cable. If the battery does in fact have a small leak (which is not so unusual) its a simple matter to deal with. Every few months, or sooner if you see signs of the leak like more corrosion, just use the baking soda and water and clean off the top of the battery to prevent any damage. I have had batteries last for several years with leaks and never fail. Of course any battery that leaks should be checked for fluid level. Use distilled water if you ever have to add any liquid.
 

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Normally you would not be seeing that much corrosion on a battery at that age. As was mentioned, there is likely some acid seepage around t he post. Its not the end of the world however. I would clean the post myself. You can use a small wire brush or even steel wool. Remove the negative battery post first and move it aside so there is no way it can touch the negative post. Next remove the positive post. Clean the post on the battery and the clamp using a small wire brush or fine sand paper. Wipe it off well when done. Also, this is important, clean the entire top and case of the battery. This is very easy to do. Using normal baking soda mix up paste with water. Brush this onto the top of the battery, an old paint brush or tooth brush works well. Use this same mixture on the battery posts and their clamps. It will likely foam up, that is normal and shows its doing its job neutralizing the battery acid. Keep cleaning until the foaming stops. Now, using lots of clean fresh water rinse all of this off. (Do this outside and make sure to wash all this run-off away so it doesn't hurt the drive way). Once you have the battery all nice and clean wipe it down with a clean rag and put the cables back on. Put the Pos. (+) cable on first. Lastly put the Neg. (-) cable back on. Some like to coat the attached cleaned cables with some Vaseline or grease as this will help keep the acid off the cable. If the battery does in fact have a small leak (which is not so unusual) its a simple matter to deal with. Every few months, or sooner if you see signs of the leak like more corrosion, just use the baking soda and water and clean off the top of the battery to prevent any damage. I have had batteries last for several years with leaks and never fail. Of course any battery that leaks should be checked for fluid level. Use distilled water if you ever have to add any liquid.
Baking soda works great. Chain auto parts stores have lot of great products to clean and protect the battery, a great do it yourself project.
 

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Don't let any of the corrosion crud get on cloths/shoes/paint.......eats 'em up. My favorite corrosion preventative is Chain Wax. it runs into the small nooks and crannies and turns into a paraffin wax that seals the posts/clamps.
 

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If your Honda battery is anything like mine, minus corrosion, its unfortunately near the end of it's life at a mere 30k miles.
The Toyota I traded in for this crv was 12 years old and still had the original battery working fine. I don’t know of any other mass produced product that after so many years of manufacturing, has such a hugely varying range of finished quality, as vehicle batteries.
 

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Just a few thoughts on the subject:

Yes what you see is unusual, and as has been posted, caused by leaking acid around the post. Since your CR is relatively new, I would ask the dealer to replace it under what I believe is a 3 year battery warranty.

You can and should check the battery water (acid) level by popping off the removable caps.

There are several ways to clean that corrosion. A mixture of baking soda and water brushed on and rinsed off with water will dissolve the corrosion. Also a product I have been using (see picture) on my four 6 volt and two 12-volt batteries in the RV works very well. Again spray it on and rinse it off. The spray will show you where the corrosion is by turning colors. It could possibly show the crack (leak) around the post.

If you do "mess" around with the battery, please do it safely. Battery acid LOVES to eat coton clothing. To avoid having your favorite pair of bluejeans become holy, (although my 14 year old granddaughter thinks they are in style now) its best wear old ones. Also use safety goggles and latex gloves.
Material property Household supply Household cleaning supply
 

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Hans471+ has a good procedure.

Do the newer Vs require a head unit security code be inputted after disconnecting the battery? FOREWARNED is FOREARMED.
Gen 5 does not require a code. However your dash will light up after restarting and you'll need to drive a couple blocks to clear. I suspect the head unit validates of the ecu directly.

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This was discussed elsewhere.
The original battery is warrantied for 36 months.

A replacement battery bought from a Honda dealer has a 100 month pro-rated warranty. It has a full replacement warranty for the first 36 months, and then a declining percentage of replacement value. The older it is, the more you pay for a replacement, after the first 36 months.
 

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That's a wide open question and would take more time than I want to spend here. If you are interested, you are welcome to search this forum for Gen 5 CRV issues, Hondacare extended warranty cost/benefits, and take note of Honda's limited basic warranty.
This is a topic about a possible bad battery that is covered under the "limited basic warranty" at no cost to the OP. I just couldn't figure out how the comment fit. Sorry for your troubles with your CR-V.
 

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Hans471+ has a good procedure.

Do the newer Vs require a head unit security code be inputted after disconnecting the battery? FOREWARNED is FOREARMED.
NO they do not. ( And I have disconnected my battery to verify this). Many new cars no longer use the security code of old. Rather they have something better, they program themselves to the vehicle VIN number. The ECM broadcasts this number over the data line. When the radio is new it waits to see this VIN number for the first time and then locks onto it. Whenever it is turned on after that it will look for that number or it will lock you out. So, leave the battery disconnected but as soon as you hook it back up the VIN is transmitted and the radio sees it and works.
 

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Popping the hood and having a good look-over is a worthwhile procedure to do on a weekly basis; i.e. check the oil/brake fluid reservoir/engine coolant tank/windshield washer tank. While the hood is open take a damp rag and give everything in there a quick wipe-down. Wipe the battery top down last and then throw the rag away. A regular shot of Silicone spray to the battery terminals will help retard any build up of post crud.
 
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