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We live in a rust belt area in Atlantic Canada. We used to own a low profile car before which rusted out...

However, we just bought a well maintained 2012 CR-V. Infact when we did the pre inspection we noticed that it had never had undercoating and that it looked more or less free of rust.


However, we have seen advice that once a car hits 3-5 years old you should start to consider undercoating and or rustproofing to extend the life time of the vehicle.

However, I've also heard people saying that undercoating and/or rustproofing is a myth and a waste of time...and to be especially carefull of certain types of rustproofing where holes gets drilled as that can make it worse...

What to believe?

So we just wanted to get some advice from CR-V owners as to what we should do... Is it worth it in the first place and if so what is the best type of rustproofing and/or undercoating to go for... ie wax, oil spray...krown, duraproof etc?

Many thanks for any help on this!
 

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Personally, I think it's a waste of money - the one troublesome thing to me is the molding along the rockers and lining the wheel openings. My area is salted heavily in the Winter as well so seeing something like that which IMO traps salt "solution" is a potential recipe for heavy rust down the road. JMO Craig
 

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Here is my thought. I think that it helps. It is also something that needs to be checked and maintained. All 3 of my vehicles are undercoated. I had them done at the dealer. I have a truck that I didn't have it done to, as the manufacturer said that it would void the warranty. I don't recall how long the warranty was, but 3 years into owning the truck I noticed things that I didn't feel comfortable with. Especially where two pieces of metal joined each other. One of those things I suspect their won't be any issues within the warranty period, but as soon as it is up you have rust issues. I also crawl underneath every vehicle in the fall and spot treat areas that need it. I then spray all of my suspension and axle parts with a product called Fluid Film to keep them from rusting.

I also spend more money in the winter at the car wash, washing the underside of my vehicles. I will only use the plain water and squirt underneath heavily. I wash my vehicles at home in the garage in the winter with a rinseless wash.
 

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I worked in the used car business for years and didn't notice a difference between the undercoated and non-undercoated cars. Also, undercoating frequently stops up the drain holes that allows the water to become trapped and causes rust. If you're going to undercoat, I was told you need to do it when the car is new and before salt and other crap gets on the metal and into the openings because undercoating traps it there and that causes rust.

The reason to get and the biggest benefit of undercoating is sound insulation. An undercoated car is quieter than one that is not undercoated.
 

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I live in Cincinnati, Ohio and i've noticed that they've been mixing sand or something along with the salt during the winters here. I've never undercoated any of the vehicles i've ever owned and i've never seen any rust then again i've never been able to own a vehicle long enough to really worry about rust because they usually get destroyed by careless drivers immediately after i finish paying it off.
 

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Undercoating is less important nowadays, because the Honda uses galvanized metal in the underbody stampings.

On our 10-year-old V, the only rusty bits are the various brackets that hold things like brake lines to the chassis.

But, things change. EG, our NJ road departments now spray salt-water brine on the roads BEFORE the snow starts falling. I'm sure that increases the corrosion factor 10 times.

Canadian owners on other forums I belong to, apply Krown or Rust-Check every season. Some owners pour ATF into the rocker panels to head off rust.


As they say, YMMV.
 

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I had been curious about undercoating too. I don't live where I need it but I always thought since the underside of the car is covered in plastic panels, how would they undercoat it? Do they take the panels off?
 

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^^ There is a wand that can be inserted behind coverings. Sometimes the installers drill holes to access remote areas...the rear fender dogleg, as an example).

Again, best protection is on a new car. And, repeated application seems to be required.
 

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Undercoating is less important nowadays, because the Honda uses galvanized metal in the underbody stampings.
I know when I bought my CR-V new in 2012 it was already done by the dealer. They did it to every car as a complimentary thing. It wasn't marked up on the price tag as a dealer installed item. I looked that over pretty close. I actually liked the product they used and tried to get them to do my truck, but was told they don't do other vehicles.

When I had my truck done, I cleaned and hosed the underside down like crazy. I noticed too, that when I took it down to have it done they hosed everything down again. There couldn't have been much of anything there, as I sprayed it down like crazy. I also removed the rear wheel well liners before going down there. And reinstalled them when I got home.

I also do it, because industrial fall out sticks to the underside, just like it does to the outside of your paint. You can't get it off like you can your paint with a clay bar. It will eventually eat through, although it takes longer underneath. Everybody is going have their opinions on this, this is just mine. It is also something that needs to be maintained yearly after the first couple years.
 

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^^ There is a wand that can be inserted behind coverings. Sometimes the installers drill holes to access remote areas...the rear fender dogleg, as an example).

Again, best protection is on a new car. And, repeated application seems to be required.
Thanks for the info. I didn't get anything done when it as new because I haven't lived in a place where it was needed. However, I'm due to transfer next summer and did put some northern states on my list. I was going to get undercoating done if I went up north. I figure I could clean the underside the best I can and then get it done. It seems like it would be better than nothing. I plan on keeping the CRV to 200K miles and want to protect it.
 

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Hi from Ontario Canada where snow, salt and sand are used many months of the year.

My opinion is no, rustproofing is not worth the cost. Metals and paint and other protection have come a long way. I remember when cars with rust and holes and blistering paint were frequently visible on the road. Not anymore, and in my opinion it is not just because of the introduction of safety checks.

I agree that possibly plugging existing drain holes is a risk.

What bugs me the most however is that most if not all of the rustproofing companies (Krown, Rust Check, etc.) have really crappy warranties and some require annual re-application and/or inspections. If you miss a year, boom, warranty is not valid. Add up all of the annual costs and one wonders if saving that cash for a body repair is more economic. In addition, the warranty has all kinds of get outs: rust has to start from the outside in, can only be below window line, can not be from stone chip or equivalent, must be detected and reported with x months of starting, must be addressed immediately, etc. The clincher: the rust proofing company is liable to a maximum dollar amount equal to the black book value of your car, not what it would take to fix it. So if you try to file a claim for, say your mint 20-year old CRV, they'll say the black book value is $1000 or some number like that and limit their payout to this amount. Don't believe me? Go read the warranty on your rust proofing contract!

Having said all of that, if I were to rust proof a car, as I did my 2007 Accord before I sold it, I'd get an annual under body oil spray. A car dripping oil is less likely to rust.

But my two new CRVs do not have any after market rust proofing.

Peter
 

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Hi from Ontario Canada where snow, salt and sand are used many months of the year.

My opinion is no, rustproofing is not worth the cost. Metals and paint and other protection have come a long way. I remember when cars with rust and holes and blistering paint were frequently visible on the road. Not anymore, and in my opinion it is not just because of the introduction of safety checks.

I agree that possibly plugging existing drain holes is a risk.

What bugs me the most however is that most if not all of the rustproofing companies (Krown, Rust Check, etc.) have really crappy warranties and some require annual re-application and/or inspections. If you miss a year, boom, warranty is not valid. Add up all of the annual costs and one wonders if saving that cash for a body repair is more economic. In addition, the warranty has all kinds of get outs: rust has to start from the outside in, can only be below window line, can not be from stone chip or equivalent, must be detected and reported with x months of starting, must be addressed immediately, etc. The clincher: the rust proofing company is liable to a maximum dollar amount equal to the black book value of your car, not what it would take to fix it. So if you try to file a claim for, say your mint 20-year old CRV, they'll say the black book value is $1000 or some number like that and limit their payout to this amount. Don't believe me? Go read the warranty on your rust proofing contract!

Having said all of that, if I were to rust proof a car, as I did my 2007 Accord before I sold it, I'd get an annual under body oil spray. A car dripping oil is less likely to rust.

But my two new CRVs do not have any after market rust proofing.

Peter
You are right about the phony lifetime warranties. My brother has a body shop and an old farmer took his old rusty truck back to the dealer for his lifetime warranty against rust that they had sold him when the truck was new. He had jumped through all of the hoops the warranty required, including annual inspections and other things. It was the only claim that anyone could find that was ever honored because they could find no loopholes. Both the rustproofing company and dealer were amazed. The old dented up Dodge farm truck got new fenders and doors.
 

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You are correct to some extent, UNDERCOATING ONLY, putting holed in your vehicle to spray inside panels creates problems. If you have it done, make sure they leave it inside for @ least 24 hrs. to cure before driving. JMHO and Good luck. PS, welcome to the forum.
David g........:cool:
 

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I have mine done annually by Krown -- I've done it and not done it on previous vehicles and I found it definitely does help. Annual application definitely reduces rust.
 

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I also live in a "salted" location. I now plan to do undercoating on my loved 2010 CRV (bought a year ago), at a small specialized company. The procedure will take 3 days. They will remove all underside panels and wheel inner liners. Wash with high-pressure water heated almost to boiling. Let dry thoroughly before spraying the chemical, first a thin version then a thicker. I was told the the chemical is not of the new environment-friendly type, it is old-school sticky petroleum-based. (In this case, I think environment will not suffer since the chemical will be just sitting on the underside.) I will ask about keeping draining holes open, having learnt about that from this thread.
 

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Save your money. Or spend it if you want.
 

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That really depends if you want to keep your car for next 10 years or 20. We've had cars over 10 years old since new and never got it done. It is a bit rusty on the metal surface at the bottom but nothing serious to worry about. We still traded it in after 11 years for a new car, so dont matter to us. Not worth the cost if you are planning on selling it anyways.
 

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A friend who is a mechanic at a dealership told me not to do it. I live where they use a lot of salt and beet juice (go figure). He said it was just a sales pitch and that the newer cars don't need it anymore.
 
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