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K&N Filter lets more air past it because it doesn't filter the micro fine dust particles very well. It only filters the large rocks (sort of speaking). More dust particles being sucked into the engine means faster internal wearing. If one keeps their vehicle for only a few short years, then sure. K&N filter - if your mind is stuck on its usage. But if you keep your engine for 6+ years (like I do), then go with OEM stock air filters. Works for me....
 

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Any change in MPG?
I see a one to two MPG difference. Now that we've switched to the winter gasoline blend, I'll try again and see.

The difference is slight. I'm not 100% certain because of the differences in day to day driving.

K&N Filter lets more air past it because it doesn't filter the micro fine dust particles very well. It only filters the large rocks (sort of speaking). More dust particles being sucked into the engine means faster internal wearing. If one keeps their vehicle for only a few short years, then sure. K&N filter - if your mind is stuck on its usage. But if you keep your engine for 6+ years (like I do), then go with OEM stock air filters. Works for me....
I've used K&N air filters in every vehicle I've purchased new. My 1995 Ford Ranger had over 250,000 miles on it when I sold it. The new owner is local and it still runs fine. I've also installed the K&Ns in my last two Civics. Over 200K miles with each and zero engine issues.

I'm not saying you're wrong. I'm just saying I haven't seen any engine issues as you've suggested.
 

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More K&N stuff.

People will believe what they want to believe.

It’s been proven time and again in actual testing what a K&N filter can and can’t do.

So far the results say they let more dirt through, and at wide open throttle may let more air through than a more typical stick filter. At anything other than wide open the airflow is irrelevant in mileage due to all aspects of the fuel/air ratio being monitored so closely now.

Old school carbureted engines were affected more by air flow at all RPMs, so there may have been a benefit.
 

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Also

People claimed (insisted) they got better mileage with magnets taped to the fuel line, that tornado thing that was placed in the air box, hundreds of different fuel additives, acetone, MEK (and other solvents, nitrogen in the tires, a cover over the bed of a truck, plus many other things I’ve forgotten.

That is until it was proven in testing that these things didn’t help. But there were still a few out there insisting their unverifiable ( or repeatable by anyone else) results were true and accurate.
 

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I've used K&N air filters in every vehicle I've purchased new. My 1995 Ford Ranger had over 250,000 miles on it when I sold it. The new owner is local and it still runs fine. I've also installed the K&Ns in my last two Civics. Over 200K miles with each and zero engine issues.

I'm not saying you're wrong. I'm just saying I haven't seen any engine issues as you've suggested.
Your engine, your choice.

In the context of this particular discussion.. what you did with a 25 year old Ford is irrelevant. As for your Civics.. specify year and model and we can actually make an informed opinion.

I guess it boils down to do you trust Honda engineering, or do you insist on second guessing them.

I know one thing for sure.. I will not make any changes to my CRV that results in airborne particles escaping the filter and entering the engine that a Honda OEM filter would prevent. That is just asking for trouble in modern, highly refined engine designs.
 

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I laugh at some of the posts... re: K&N Filters let more air through it but also stops all dust partials. Its like saying the screen door lets more air through it but still stops the same amount of stuff. Funny..... Bigger the holes, the more "stuff" gets past it. Simple science....
 

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Your engine, your choice.

In the context of this particular discussion.. what you did with a 25 year old Ford is irrelevant. As for your Civics.. specify year and model and we can actually make an informed opinion.

My first Civic, a 2007 LX. I saw about five more miles per gallon with a K&N.
Next was my 2012 EX. I saw the same five MPG improvement after installing the K&N air filter.

I've done some research in the last few hours. There is no doubt the K&N air filters allow more dirt particles to pass. The amount is small, but it is measurable. As such, I'm reconsidering my use of the K&N filter. There isn't enough gain to offset the risk.

I appreciate everyone's comments.
 

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I find it absolutely amazing that people would think a car manufacturer would leave 5mpg on the table due to insufficient air flow. You do realize that all they needed to do was increase the surface area of the stock filter to accomplish the same thing.
 

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And I find it just as amazing that someone would doubt my word. Five MPG is pretty hard to ignore. I commute one hundred and twenty six miles every other day. I used to calculate my mileage at the pump.

I don't pretend to know the minds of automobile designers. Nor do I need to. My observations do not require your understanding ondavr.
 

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There isn’t any reason to get offended, there is no offense intended.

I’ve had K&N filters in vehicles, they were installed when I got the vehicles. I left them in for years because I lived in a wet area with very little dust.

When I moved to a dry area with dust I removed them and put paper filters back in. There was no noticeable change in HP or mileage in any vehicle.

When you talk to people that modify motors for a living, or do it as a serious hobby, they will tell you on a modern vehicle you need to modify several components or systems to get an increase in mileage and/or performance. Just changing one item rarely results in any gains.

The manufacturers of single items or systems frequently make claims that are beyond what they can actually deliver.

In cases like this, a manufacturer could claim increases as much as 25hp, or 20% better mileage. But that may only work on one vehicle from 1972. This is all accurate and legal, they just don’t tell you it’s only on that one car.
 

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Yet, I saw the improvement. Funny that. Yet, you keep saying I'm mistaken. I'm NOT mistaken.

Perhaps it's a function of how we drive. I'm mostly on the highway. In Maryland with few hills. I keep my cruise control on. It's usually set to seventy-three. Fast enough to keep ahead of the slowpokes, and slow enough to not attract the troopers.
 

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Yet, I saw the improvement. Funny that. Yet, you keep saying I'm mistaken. I'm NOT mistaken.

Perhaps it's a function of how we drive. I'm mostly on the highway. In Maryland with few hills. I keep my cruise control on. It's usually set to seventy-three. Fast enough to keep ahead of the slowpokes, and slow enough to not attract the troopers.
Many tests on gasoline engines using computer controlled fuel mixtures in fuel injected vehicles show basically no difference in mpg with a new clean engine air filter vs a pretty dirty engine air filter. So, how does the K&N give you that miraculous 5 mpg increase ?
But, a K&N also 'loads' with less dirt faster than the OEM filter and then has less airflow than the OEM.


I also had a friend who used one of those 'magic' fuel computer things that you spliced into some wires that made a lot more power and better mpg in his GMC truck. He swore by it until I showed him that his 'magic' computer was a scam and the video showed what was actually inside his 'magic' computer. It even had a 'switch' you could set for 'power' or 'economy'. That switch also did nothing electrically. hahahahahah He swore it made a BIG difference whether it was in 'economy' or 'power' mode. Yep, he really did. :D

On a smaller cc engine like your Honda engine, which doesn't require a LOT of air, even the full throttle power increase is almost nothing.
Yes, the K&N will deliver a little more HP at FULL throttle and it will also allow more dirt into the engine at any throttle position, but is it enough dirt to cause noticeable engine wear? I don't know.

There are some good actual tests done by people who used several different air filters (gauze, foam, and paper) on their own vehicles for around 5k miles each, and ALL said more dirt was passed through the gauze and foam filters than the paper ones and there was no noticeable increase in mpg, but, there was a possible increase in power at full throttle using both the gauze and foam filters and definitely a more powerful noise coming from the airbox, :) . 5 mpg and a blazing increase in acceleration, NO.

Still, if it works for you physically or mentally, keep using it. :D :D ?


Buffalo4
PS: Look up on why the oiled gauze air filter came to be. You could find it interesting.
PPS: If you actually got a 5mpg increase when you installed the K&N, then something else caused that increase, not the K&N.
 

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I like the "fuel line magnets" that clip on around your fuel lines and claim that "as gasoline flows past the magnet, the magnetic field will "break apart clusters of fuel molecules so gas burns more efficiently.""
 

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Yet, I saw the improvement. Funny that. Yet, you keep saying I'm mistaken. I'm NOT mistaken.

Perhaps it's a function of how we drive. I'm mostly on the highway. In Maryland with few hills. I keep my cruise control on. It's usually set to seventy-three. Fast enough to keep ahead of the slowpokes, and slow enough to not attract the troopers.
Could also be confirmation bias, or possibly just perception. That is not a nick on you... I am just pointing out that the human mind is incredibly clever at establishing a narrative that it wants.... and can even ignore otherwise solid data, facts, and logic if needed to fulfill that goal. It is precisely why twitter and facebook are the general topical cesspools that they are these days.... the human mind in action.. with a cause that often defies logic.

That said.. here's the thing.. it's your vehicle... so you do what you want to it, and make any claims you feel are justified. That is perfectly fine. :) When you however expect others to adopt your version of reality when other data and facts conflict with it... then you are on a crusade.. and that rarely ends well in internet forums for the crusader. So you have stated your facts for the record.. and others have stated facts that may not agree... and that should be OK to you as well. So just drive your CRV and enjoy your fuel economy.

Personally, I live in a dusty environment in California... so the last thing I would do is put a filter known to be inferior to the OEM filters for the purposes of filtering small particulates out of the intake air into any of my vehicles. My vehicles, my choice :) ... and I don't give a rats behind about exact fuel economy... because a lot of things affect fuel economy... and I cannnot control all of them, nor should I.
 

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As I stated in an earlier post, I've gone back to using an OEM paper filter. The small mileage gains the K&N air filter grant with this engine aren't great enough to warrant the possible extra wear.

I'll gladly send my K&N air filter to any of the doubters. You can try it for your self, for free. My only suggestion is to not try a comparison with gasoline blended for winter. Note that you'll receive the filter in the exact condition it is now. Which is with a little dust collected on it.
 

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As I stated in an earlier post, I've gone back to using an OEM paper filter. The small mileage gains the K&N air filter grant with this engine aren't great enough to warrant the possible extra wear.

I'll gladly send my K&N air filter to any of the doubters. You can try it for your self, for free. My only suggestion is to not try a comparison with gasoline blended for winter. Note that you'll receive the filter in the exact condition it is now. Which is with a little dust collected on it.
The filter is no longer available.
 

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As I stated in an earlier post, I've gone back to using an OEM paper filter. The small mileage gains the K&N air filter grant with this engine aren't great enough to warrant the possible extra wear.

I'll gladly send my K&N air filter to any of the doubters. You can try it for your self, for free. My only suggestion is to not try a comparison with gasoline blended for winter. Note that you'll receive the filter in the exact condition it is now. Which is with a little dust collected on it.
5 mpg is NOT a "small mileage gain". esp with the miles you drive.
I doubt anyone would take you up on your offer for a free used K&N engine air filter anyways.
Buffalo4
 

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I bought into the whole K&N thing long ago, but realized that it was a waste of money. The air filter doesn't add very much power (1-2hp at most). Now, when I upgraded my exhaust and modified the intake on my Mustang (Magnaflow X pipe and catback), that did add significant power. Most factory filters flow just fine. Also, most modern exhaust systems flow fine as well. The biggest thing is to keep your filters changed -- a new paper filter will always flow better than a dirty K&N ;) I've also had to clean my MAF and throttle body several times because of the K&N oil that stuck to the sensors. It's a waste of money.
 
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