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There has been a lot of information on tire age and wear in this thread. I would recommend stopping at your local America's Tire Discount Tire store for an inspection to be safe.

Here is a link to some good safety information:

Tire Safety | Discount Tire

If we can be of assistance please let us know.
Does DT have a policy regarding "not re-installing" a tire, due to X year old tire date stamp? Thanks.
 

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Hello Fellow CR-V Neighbors,

I have two Bridge Stone tires that I bought in November of 2014. The milage was around 73,000 miles. Today my milage is at 129,000. I was told potentially the tires could get close to 80,000 miles but not to exceed 6 years. There is plenty of tread left on these tires. I am still in the green zone according to their graph. Of course if I go into Discount Tires and ask this question they will tell me I need to get new tires. Two new tires will cost me $ 400.00 plus tax. My funds can be meager so I wanted to get your opinions before handing over that good money. I am retired and I don't do that much driving. I do take her on short road trips now and then.

Thankyou for all replies!

Love my 2007 EX-L!
Being that you have Bridgestone tires and not some off-brand cheapy tires, you should be able to run 10 years on them or until they're worn, whichever comes first. Personally, I'd never run down to the wear bars; I usually replace my tires once they get to around 3/32" or 4/32". I've had some older Bridgestone tires that lasted over 70,000 miles with 5/32" of tread left and only minor weather-checking on the sidewall and between the sipes of the tread. They were about 9 years old so I had them replaced. Here in Hawaii, we don't get the cold/hot cycles like places on the mainland, but our ambient ranges from 60F to 95F from winter to summer with high humidity. The industry standard is 10 years on tires which is why our state inspection program fails a vehicle inspection if the tire(s) are 10 years old or older (determined by the manufacture date code). All current tires use a 4 digit number after the DOT stamp on one side of the tire. The first 2 digits are the week of manufacture and the last 2 digits are the year. For example, if you have the code 0914 that means it was produced on the 9th week of 2014, which would mean around the first week of March 2014.

As for brands, I've seen some Michelin tires equipped as standard equipment for a vehicle perhaps 5 or so years ago that developed "chunking" of the tire tread on a car that was only about 2 or 3 years old. It would look as if someone dug out pieces of the tread surface and it was prevalent throughout the entire tire tread. This was not on a 4x4 where you might think if they drove on a rocky road perhaps that would explain it, but this was on a regular passenger type vehicle. We saw this on a number of vehicles equipped with Michelin tires back then and I suspect they had an issue with the tread rubber compound that caused it to deteriorate in such a manner. I haven't seen that on recent ones so just because it's a brand name doesn't mean it can't have issues.
 

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The sidewalls facing the outside of the car may look good, especially if they get some Armor All on them now and then, but the sidewalls facing the inside may have started cracking and that is something you may not see.
Actually, the outer sidewalls will deteriorate long before the inside ones, which are not exposed to sunlight/UV.
 

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This is one of those... "best to be well informed topics". :)

Tire rubber ages out, regardless of miles driven or tread wear.

Can you get away with running on tires older than 6 years of age? Yeah.. maybe. Is it prudent to do so? Depends entirely on how well you have taken care of your tires, particularly exposure to harsh conditions.

So.. as Carbuff2 has shared.. it's a gamble. Your vehicle, your choice.

Professional tire shops, almost universally, will tell you NOT to run on tires older than 6 years of age, regardless of remaining tread wear. There is a reason for this.... because the science of tire rubber is well proven and established. The 6 years is perhaps a conservative number for some owners, but tire pros cannot account for owners who have always taken proper maintenance on their tires, garaged their vehicles from weather, and have not driven under any severe conditions in the prior 6 years.


More specifically: https://www.americastire.com/learn/tire-aging

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TIRE AGING PROCESS
Tire Aging Process


Tires contain anti-aging properties that are mixed into their rubber compounds. Tires contain anti-ozonants that help the rubber stay soft, flexible, and conducive to grip. Over time, air begins to permeate the tire wall and weaken the integrity of the tire’s structure; causing the tire’s flexible structure to become brittle and lose strength. This deterioration process is known as oxidation, since oxygen serves as the catalyst of decay.

In addition to the degradation caused by the permeation of air and oxygen particles, other factors can cause tires to lose their gripping power and overall effectiveness. Research conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) maintains that tires age more rapidly in heat. Warm climates and exposure to direct sunlight can speed up the aging process by accelerating oxidation. Therefore, the tires equipped on vehicles that are stored outdoors, such as trailers or RVs, will age faster than tires on vehicles stored in a garage.

Tires will also age faster if they are improperly cared for or are abused. If tires are driven while overinflated or underinflated, internal damage could occur that may not be detected through visual inspection. Impacts, punctures, and improper tire repairs may also cause damage that could permanently decrease the life of tires. These occurrences weaken their integrity and contribute to premature aging. To reduce these risks, make sure your tires are correctly inflated, regularly maintained, and treated with respect.


Less Than 6 Years Old:
These tires should deliver dependable performance, but treadwear may change traction capabilities in adverse weather conditions. For maintenance, you should perform a monthly inspection which includes an air pressure check. Rotate every 6,000 – 8,000 miles, and balance every 12,000 – 16,000 miles. Avoid extreme heat.

6-10 Years Old:
If you have improperly maintained tires, they will likely reach the end of their service life at or before 6-10 years.

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Personally, as a low miles per year driver, I almost never wear out tire tread, and I take really good care of my tires. I still replace them after 6 years of life.

At the end of the day, only you have the information to know how well your tires have been maintained, and what they have been exposed to. Good luck with your decision. :)
I will agree with all of this, generally speaking. In my experience, climate and terrain notwithstanding, the two most important factors affecting tire life are brand and maintenance. This is even more critical with motorcycle tires, but I won't get into that here. The first set of el cheapo tires I can remember buying I got from a Gibson's Discount Center in the late sixties. I paid a hundred bucks for the set, installed on my '59 VW Microbus. They were 14" bias ply. They lasted the four years I needed them to, with no flats or other issues. The last set I bought new are still on my truck. Top of the line Michelin, ten-ply LTX's. At six years they are cracking and worn out long before their 80k mile rating. But they have performed flawlessly, with not a single issue, under hard and heavy use. In between I've owned all the major brands, with varying degrees of luck. Goodyears were horrible, as were Goodrich and Bridgestone. Pirellis were excellent. Michelins were best, and I eventually settled on those. I've never had a single issue with any Michelin tire, over about 30 years. The Pirellis that came on my CR-V are noisy and stiff, but they are wearing like iron. It will get Michelins next time out.

As a big truck driver I learned early on that maintenance is key to tire life, safety, and savings. I've never owned a car for ten years, but I have had a set of Michelins and a set of Pirellis that lasted eight years, and with no cracking. OTOH I've seen those other brands crack after only three or four years. THis is in Texas, where the sun shines bright, the heat is gruelingly long and extreme, but there's no extreme cold or harsh road chemical exposure. YMMV.
 

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You guys make it sound like CR has thousands of employees, out there running the wheels off a huge fleet of cars, long term testing every model of every brand of tire. I don't buy it. I was a member there for a few years before I dropped them. Their reports just didn't jive. Not just on tires but on the gamut of things they offer data on. So, drink that koolaid if you want to. I'll pass. They are journalists who make a living selling their reports. That is the only thing they are expert at. Jacks of all trades, masters of none. Just my two cents. Worth two cents, the same value as your two cents.
 

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Recently bought some Nankang SP9 tires for my 2017, for $83 each delivered, through Walmart. Just waiting to hit the wear bars on the oems, then I’ll have them mount and balance for $12. Total cost will be under $400 for all 4. Tread wear is reportedly good on this tire. I’ll report my opinion of them when I get some miles on them.
 

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Something I've noticed in other forums over the years is, moderators worth their salt, generally keep their $0.02 in their pocket. Up until recently, that was the case with this forum. Times change.
 

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Recently bought some Nankang SP9 tires for my 2017, for $83 each delivered, through Walmart. Just waiting to hit the wear bars on the oems, then I’ll have them mount and balance for $12. Total cost will be under $400 for all 4. Tread wear is reportedly good on this tire. I’ll report my opinion of them when I get some miles on them.
Ongoing reports will be appreciated.?
 

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Discussion Starter #50
My 2003 Dodge Ram has the original Firestone tires, yes, 17 years old, but only 25,000 miles on the vehicle. There are no visible cracks, so I will continue to monitor them and drive on. I rotate them every 5000 miles. I'm sure I'll hear the gloom and doom commentary from some folks. I also plug tires if I pick up a foreign object that results in air loss - and run the tread off them afterward, including my motorcycle tires. Been doing so for over 55 years, never had a blowout.

Wow, 17 year old tires. Congratulations! Even with just 25,000 miles those Firestones have served you well.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Using my phone to reply. Sorry my post is on your post. Was trying to quote you. ?
 

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Discussion Starter #52
A lot of diverse and good information in the replies. Thank you all for taking the time to share your experience.
 

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I can't tell you all how helpful it has been to read your replies! I had no idea tires could be cheaper and perform just as well. I have been viewing the Discount Tires page. Had no idea that I could go online and order tires myself. I keep my car in a garage and want to keep my tires out of the intense sun during the summers.. From reading the link ( thank you so much for providing that) one of the stressers for tires is the sun. I also wonder if their is a product to use that will help the life of the tires?

I thank each and everyone of you.
Hello Epona, Just the other day I watched a video on YouTube... It was one of Scotty Kilmer's videos!! He says that "AT-205" will Recondition Rubber plus it helps with other things too!! I am thinking about getting some and trying it! I also watched a video of the actual stuff!! Sounds like some pretty good stuff!!
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Hello Epona, Just the other day I watched a video on YouTube... It was one of Scotty Kilmer's videos!! He says that "AT-205" will Recondition Rubber plus it helps with other things too!! I am thinking about getting some and trying it! I also watched a video of the actual stuff!! Sounds like some pretty good stuff!!
Hey hi there! I also watch Scotty's videos. I will check him out to get more information on tires. Thank you for the reference!
 

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Scotty is polarizing, that's for sure. And I'll leave it at that. 😁 I doubt any tire treatment is going to reverse the effects of aging. Having blown a couple of older tires in my life (one on a freeway), I tend to replace them.

I have shopped for tires online for a long time--I used to order from Tire Rack back when they ran two- and four-page ads in Motor Trend, as their prices were better than anything locally, even after installation. I grew tired of spending so much money on mediocre Michelin tires and ended up buying a set of Yokohamas that were less money, but they rode nicer and gripped the road much better. I bought a few sets of Yokohama tires over the years. When times got tighter about 12 years ago, I bought a set of Kumho tires and was not disappointed at all--my last several sets have been Kumho.

Generally if you shop the sales and check multiple places you can get good deals on many brands out there. One of my last sets was from SimpleTire online. I have no issues having tires shipped to the house, and having a local shop put them on. Some (like Tire Rack) will ship to an approved installer. Or Discount Tire does everything on one site, like I did with a set for my daughter's car (they ended up being the cheapest on tires + installation that time around).

I do avoid the cheap no-name brands though. It helps to ask around.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Scotty is polarizing, that's for sure. And I'll leave it at that. 😁 I doubt any tire treatment is going to reverse the effects of aging. Having blown a couple of older tires in my life (one on a freeway), I tend to replace them.

I have shopped for tires online for a long time--I used to order from Tire Rack back when they ran two- and four-page ads in Motor Trend, as their prices were better than anything locally, even after installation. I grew tired of spending so much money on mediocre Michelin tires and ended up buying a set of Yokohamas that were less money, but they rode nicer and gripped the road much better. I bought a few sets of Yokohama tires over the years. When times got tighter about 12 years ago, I bought a set of Kumho tires and was not disappointed at all--my last several sets have been Kumho.

Generally if you shop the sales and check multiple places you can get good deals on many brands out there. One of my last sets was from SimpleTire online. I have no issues having tires shipped to the house, and having a local shop put them on. Some (like Tire Rack) will ship to an approved installer. Or Discount Tire does everything on one site, like I did with a set for my daughter's car (they ended up being the cheapest on tires + installation that time around).

I do avoid the cheap no-name brands though. It helps to ask around.
Hey Wildcat,

All 4 of my tires came from Discount Tires. So that is good to know.

Thank you for your reply. 😊
 
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