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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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Welcome to the forum! When I did this conversion on my '97 Jeep Cherokee, I learned that the Ford Explorer used the same parts, which were interchangeable. It worked out great! Huge improvement. If you can find a friendly Honda parts guy to help you, you should be able to find what you need, maybe. If any others will interchange, like the Civic, or whatever. Good luck with the project, and let us know what you learn!
 

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Super Moderator
1997, 2002, 2017 my expertese lies there
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In order for anyone to actually help or offer advice, we all need just a little more info than what was given

those who own a crv in your region should be chiming in but remember the car is about 25 years old
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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9,271 Posts
Drum brakes require periodic adjustments, but they work well on the rear axle. A friend with a mid-2000s Civic actually complained after I adjusted theirs, they said the car stopped TOO WELL!

Don't buy into the notion that they are 'self-adjusting'.

+++++++++++++

Interesting avatar you have there! :)
 

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2000 LX 5spd awd
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234 Posts
Google it. I found quite a few different ways to do a conversion. None of them seem worth the money to me. I agree properly adjusted drums work just fine by me.

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Not even worth the money, properly set up drum brakes will stop almost as well as disc, and no noticeable performance difference in the rear.

I just went through a brake system on a 196s Galaxy 500. First car I had ever dealt with front drum brakes. Didnt take anymore effort than tears to get set right and stops the gigantic boat just fine.

The only real benefit to disc is heat dissipation. That's the biggest thing behind their existence over drum. For stopping power under normal day to day mellow driving, drums would be plenty. Add in highway speeds, traffic and such, fronts need better heat dissipation to deal with brake fade.

Be cheap and easier just to redo the rear drum brakes including new hardware (and lubing/installing correctly of shoes, hardware and adjusters) and forget about them for another 80k.

Fyi they dont need periodic adjustment if maintained and put grease on the adjuster threads.

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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9,271 Posts
they dont need periodic adjustment if maintained and put grease on the adjuster threads.
Beg to differ, as I posted earlier.

Adjusting the drum brakes yearly (or, when the wheels are off for tire rotation) can clearly enhance their effectiveness. That is a good time to inspect the wheel cylinders for leakage.🏆 Lubrication of the brake-shoe-to-backing-plate needs to be done more than every 70K miles.

Tigris must be a youngster :giggle:. 4 wheel drum systems were usually supposed to be adjusted every oil change (every 1500 - 3000 miles in the days of mineral oils). And lets not talk about what happened when your drum braked car was driven through a puddle!!! o_O
 

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Beg to differ, as I posted earlier.

Adjusting the drum brakes yearly (or, when the wheels are off for tire rotation) can clearly enhance their effectiveness. That is a good time to inspect the wheel cylinders for leakage. Lubrication of the brake-shoe-to-backing-plate needs to be done more than every 70K miles.

Tigris must be a youngster :giggle:. 4 wheel drum systems were usually supposed to be adjusted every oil change (every 1500 - 3000 miles in the days of mineral oils). And lets not talk about what happened when your drum braked car was driven through a puddle!!! o_O
Ya that was the oldest I have worked on. Also might be why our recommendations on drum brakes differ. More modern drum brakes (pretty much anything since the late 90s early 2000s) need no real attention beyond checking conditions of the shoes once they get some age/mileage on them. The self adjustment set ups work much better than they used to.

Really want to get thrown for a loop, look at 2000s+ GM car drums brakes. The design is rather interesting, simple and works surprisingly well till the spring breaks.

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On larger vehicles like trucks with the full-float 14b unsprung weight (or just weight in general) is another reason for discs -- the original cast drums are huge and heavy. However on a smaller vehicle like a CR-V I doubt there's much, if any, weight savings from a rotor and caliper to a drum.

The other bummer with most drums is that it's not nearly as easy to eyeball friction lining condition. Most light duty drum setups have the wheel bearings integral to the drum, so you've gotta remove your spindle nut to get the drum off.....then if the shoes have grooved the ID much you get to pull out an adjuster spoon and blindly paddle away at a star wheel hidden somewhere in a tiny slit, generally placed in an area where you can barely swing said spoon because the engineers were bored and got a chuckle out of angering future mekaniks.....

now some drums were cool(er) like Ford's 10.25 where the drum was NOT integral to the wb hub and so it just slides off once the wheel is removed...but again this requires a standalone wb hub which is typically only found in ff (full float) applications.

Anyway in the video posted here in post #3 the video maker specifies the parts he used in a rear disc swap:
 

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On larger vehicles like trucks with the full-float 14b unsprung weight (or just weight in general) is another reason for discs -- the original cast drums are huge and heavy. However on a smaller vehicle like a CR-V I doubt there's much, if any, weight savings from a rotor and caliper to a drum.

The other bummer with most drums is that it's not nearly as easy to eyeball friction lining condition. Most light duty drum setups have the wheel bearings integral to the drum, so you've gotta remove your spindle nut to get the drum off.....then if the shoes have grooved the ID much you get to pull out an adjuster spoon and blindly paddle away at a star wheel hidden somewhere in a tiny slit, generally placed in an area where you can barely swing said spoon because the engineers were bored and got a chuckle out of angering future mekaniks.....

now some drums were cool(er) like Ford's 10.25 where the drum was NOT integral to the wb hub and so it just slides off once the wheel is removed...but again this requires a standalone wb hub which is typically only found in ff (full float) applications.

Anyway in the video posted here in post #3 the video maker specifies the parts he used in a rear disc swap:
Vehicles that require rear hub/drum removal were pretty much dead after the 80s/early 90s in fwd vehicles and non-existent in anything rear wheel drive. But like older hub bearing designs both disc and drum required removal.

Basically anything with drums located on powered (or able to be powers but no axle like crvs) axles are not bearing removal to access. Those, along with disc versions, are limited to undriven wheels only.

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