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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of purchasing a new 2017 CR-V and the dealer is offering a lifetime(upto 100,000 miles) maintenance care plan for $674. I am yet to see the fine print on it but he said my bills will be $0 for all schedule maintenance.

Does anyone know how much the scheduled maintenance cost will be over a period of 5 years, around 7500 miles a year? I am interested to know costs other than regular oil changes for a new car.

If regular oil changes + Multi Point Inspections are enough, the same dealer has service coupons for $30 which may be cheaper for my usage.
 

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At 7500 miles per year you'll only use 1 oil change. There isn't a whole lot more than that to do other than give it a good inspection to be sure everything is connected properly and wearing well. If you are going to keep it 100k miles or more and their offer is truly lifetime then at 7500 mile intervals once a year you'll get 13 oil changes. At $674 that puts them about $50 each. The big question is how long you'll keep the car and what exactly they provide. If you already plan to make a change in 5 years then that's $135 per year which is super expensive compared to the $30 coupon. I passed on everything and will decide before I get to 6k miles if I want the C/D 80 extended warranty from Hyannis Honda. Good luck with your decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
At 7500 miles per year you'll only use 1 oil change. There isn't a whole lot more than that to do other than give it a good inspection to be sure everything is connected properly and wearing well. If you are going to keep it 100k miles or more and their offer is truly lifetime then at 7500 mile intervals once a year you'll get 13 oil changes. At $674 that puts them about $50 each. The big question is how long you'll keep the car and what exactly they provide. If you already plan to make a change in 5 years then that's $135 per year which is super expensive compared to the $30 coupon. I passed on everything and will decide before I get to 6k miles if I want the C/D 80 extended warranty from Hyannis Honda. Good luck with your decision.
Thanks! I will try to negotiate it down during the closing and after I get to see the fineprint. I will be more inclined to go for it if it covers items more than just MPI and Oil Change.

Do you happen to know about the maintenance schedule for 2017 CRV? I went through the manuals online but they all talk about what each Maintenance Code means.
 

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If regular oil changes + Multi Point Inspections are enough, the same dealer has service coupons for $30 which may be cheaper for my usage.
I would also check to see if the $30 oil changes work with your new car. With the synthetic blend plus tire rotation, I am usually at $75 per visit.
 

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I suppose if you don't change the oil or rotate tires yourself, and keep your vehicle at least 10 years, it might be worth it, depending on what's covered. My cost to change oil on our Gen 2 CR-V is about $30 using a genuine Honda filter and non-synthetic oil. Checking the 2017 owners manual, I don't see Honda recommending synthetic oil so I doubt synthetic oil is included in your Lifetime Care Warranty. However, if they also cover trans, diff, air filters, cabin filters, brake fluid, etc. Then it might be a good deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for your inputs. I am also looking at Honda Sentinel program and that seems to cover Oil Changes(only) and Road Hazard protection.
 

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My cost to change oil on our Gen 2 CR-V is about $30 using a genuine Honda filter and non-synthetic oil. Checking the 2017 owners manual, I don't see Honda recommending synthetic oil so I doubt synthetic oil is included in your Lifetime Care Warranty. .
My 2016 recommends 0W20 oil and the only 0W20 I can find is synthetic. I chose Mobil 1.
 

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You may be right, our 2004 uses 5W-20, didn't know 0W-20 is only synthetic. In that case, the maintenance plan might even be more useful.
 

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You may be right, our 2004 uses 5W-20, didn't know 0W-20 is only synthetic. In that case, the maintenance plan might even be more useful.
0w-20 also comes in a synthetic blend, which is what Honda puts in at the factory and most dealers use by default. That will be a bit less than a full synthetic oil change.
 

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That doesn't seem like a viscosity for Texas where it's hotter than blazes in the summer.
The engine temperature is controlled by the thermostat so it doesn't matter what the air temperature is as long as the cooling system is working properly.
 

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That doesn't seem like a viscosity for Texas where it's hotter than blazes in the summer.
I live in Texas and have concerns using the 0W-20 which the auto manufacturers went to for improved mpg (fractionally) to better meet govt standards. When it's a 100 degrees outside and you're stuck in stop & go traffic for an hour with your a/c on full blast, your car's cooling system will be stretched (and if it's a turbo?) I always go with the full synthetic 0W-20 as a precaution.
 

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That doesn't seem like a viscosity for Texas where it's hotter than blazes in the summer.
Why do you say that? This is a engine cooled by water and controlled by a thermostat. Its not gonna run any hotter in texas than it is in upstate new york.
 

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Then why for decades did they advise different viscosity for summer/winter and north/south? Yeah, it's water cooled but there's more to the oil than a cooling mechanism. It just doesn't seem to fit to me.
 

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Then why for decades did they advise different viscosity for summer/winter and north/south? Yeah, it's water cooled but there's more to the oil than a cooling mechanism. It just doesn't seem to fit to me.
The cars were designed to use the thicker oil (oil passages, bearing clearances, etc) but the thick oil kept the cars from cranking fast enough to start in cold weather. I remember very few cars starting in cold weather when I was a kid in the 50s and 60s. The conventional oil of the day got very thick when it was cold. Thin oil was used for starting.
 

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So 90 weight would be just as good as long as the thermostat and cooling system are functioning and there's Prestone in the radiator.
No, because you use the weight of oil the engine was designed to use. The oil passages and bearing clearances dictate the weight. If you use oil that is a lot thicker, the engine will fail due to lack of lubrication.
 

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Then why for decades did they advise different viscosity for summer/winter and north/south? Yeah, it's water cooled but there's more to the oil than a cooling mechanism. It just doesn't seem to fit to me.
Because the chemistry of oils have changed from the 1950's to present things like viscosity improvers, the quality of base stocks ect. do some research you have much to learn about motor oil. Try going to a website called Bob Is The Oil Guy and start reading.
 
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