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Discussion Starter #1
I've done some searching and there's a good number of posts regarding them MM here on the forum containing a wealth of information. I never knew until today that you could "peek" at the MM prior to it going off at a 15% OCI to see what sub codes have been flagged - going to check that out today.

My '09 V was my first introduction to a decent Maintenance Minder and originally I thought it was the best thing ever, especially considering it was "smart" enough to calculate oil change requirements based on environmental and driving parameters. But over time as my vehicle got older with more miles, I think I've reached a time where the Oil Change Interval has got out of synch with other maintenance items like the transmission and rear diff fluid changes. I am also beginning to wonder about how long its pushing my current oil... I am over 8,000 miles since my last oil change and the MM just dropped to 40% - that seems a bit long for dealer oil which I understand is "Synthetic Blend" 5w-20. At this rate I'll be over 10k miles before the MM goes off. I also noticed that it's been about 18k miles since I last had the rear diff fluid changed, so I did that on my own while working on the rear brakes recently. In any event, I am now suspect that the subcode items are going longer than the should because they don't display until it comes around to an oil change, something which has got worse over time by the accumulation of nearest OCI periods. I recall requesting the last rear diff service be done despite the MM not indicating it was needed as well when I brought it into the dealer, and reviewing my service log they agreed it was reasonable to add it. So I plan on taking everything into my own hands, especially as I will likely shorten the intervals to accommodate the wear & tear of years of service in an effort to keep it running as long as possible.

Anyway, I think the MM is a good technology, but I think I would rather have it display subcodes on their own rather than attempt to group them with an oil change. If the car needs service, it needs service and pushing some items out an extra 10k miles just to line up with an oil change doesn't seem right. Moral of the story - use the MM as an aid, but keep a record on your own as well. This is even more important as Honda has switched to electronic service records and doesn't even provide a log book with newer vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Thinking about this, I wonder if the possibility exists for some maint item to go beyond it's scheduled interval that may impact a warranty claim? On the one hand, all Honda provides you is the MM, yet buried in the manual are some specified periods of time and/or distance and I suspect that Honda has defacto maximums for everything. If, as in my case, you had the vehicle dealer serviced since new and something was overlooked, I wonder how far you could push it and say it was the dealers fault should something fail and a claim was needed?

Edit - I also wonder if my MM may have got out of synch once when the battery died? Is the MM affected by power loss? Seems every CRV eventually hits that point due to the tiny batteries they provide.
 

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Everything in Moderation
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Your MM won't 'forget' anything when a battery dies. Your odo doesn't reset when that happens, right?

I agree that as time and miles go on, the secondary services become less accurately displayed. (Especially for DIYers, or those who have an indie mechanic or quick-lube place change the oil.)

That said, you should not have to worry about your oil at 8K miles when coming off the summer driving season. Your '09 and MM is spec'd for 5w-20 mineral oil right? So, 12K on a semi-syn won't hurt anything. (Tho' I've noticed that the MM drops faster during the second half of an OCI.)


One thing I DO still appreciate is the MMs accuracy winter VS summer. Our Fit always gets less miles per OCI in the winter due to increased cold running (and stop-n-go traffic, probably). But it still looks clean as a whistle under the valve cover, even with 9 to 12K oil changes! (We use Synth oil and run it to 150% of the MM's suggestion). I bet any dealer or mechanic wouldn't say it was neglected.

I've always maintained a Pencil and Paper service log, and I don't care if you call me Fred Flintstone. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Your MM won't 'forget' anything when a battery dies. Your odo doesn't reset when that happens, right?
The only part I wasn't sure about is that beyond the odometer there are many parameters that get lost or reset when power is lost. OBD codes get cleared and removing power is a generally suggested tool used for resetting things when they go haywire... And something seemingly important as idle settings apparently get reset requiring the "idle learn procedure" to be performed after power is lost or removed. Of course, it is logical that certain things need the ability to be reset for diagnostic or service reasons and others to be permanently retained. I never had the foresight to check the MM after replacing the battery to confirm it was still correct.
 

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Everything in Moderation
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The Idle Learn Procedure simply shortcuts the ECU's learning of the settings. Idle control is a dynamic thing. The ECU is always fin-tuning it.


Couple of times I forgot to do the ILP and it took about 15 drive cycles to get back to the way it was before. (This was after cleaning the throttle butterfly..also, once, I removed the air filter and forgot to plug in one of the sensors) D'oh!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
One last thought ;) I've always wondered why oil level is not monitored in any manner... Granted if you run low enough on oil your pressure will drop causing an alarm, but it seems reasonable enough that affordable technology exists that could indicate oil level or at least if it fell below a warning threshold (they exist for washer fluid levels!). Most cars burn a small amount of oil, and even Honda states that oil consumption of 1qt / 3000 miles is within specifications, so it may not take entirely too long for the oil level to fall to a point requiring topping off, and with extended OCI's you could well fall to a low level before a change is due. Just seems like an oil level monitor would be a common sense indicator to have, and I'm surprised with all of the high tech wizardry in today's vehicles that we still don't have one.
 

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One last thought ;) I've always wondered why oil level is not monitored in any manner... Granted if you run low enough on oil your pressure will drop causing an alarm, but it seems reasonable enough that affordable technology exists that could indicate oil level or at least if it fell below a warning threshold (they exist for washer fluid levels!). Most cars burn a small amount of oil, and even Honda states that oil consumption of 1qt / 3000 miles is within specifications, so it may not take entirely too long for the oil level to fall to a point requiring topping off, and with extended OCI's you could well fall to a low level before a change is due. Just seems like an oil level monitor would be a common sense indicator to have, and I'm surprised with all of the high tech wizardry in today's vehicles that we still don't have one.
Given that maybe 2/3rds of car owners these days never open the hood and wouldn't know how to check the oil if they did, this seems reasonable. Or maybe new cars don't consume oil and thrive despite the neglect.
 

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Everything in Moderation
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Our 1988 Mustang 5.0 had a low oil sensor.

I had to replace the sensor when it started to leak oil! (Was that a Self-Fulfilling Prophesy or what? LOL)


PS: "Acceptable" oil consumption is considered to be 1 quart per 1000 miles according to most manufacturers.
 
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