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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all. My dealer has provided me with a replacement vehicle to drive while we all wait for the Takata airbag repair. I am aware that the problems have been primarily in the hot and humid southern US, but I'm driving around with my little boy in it and I'm not comfortable with the risk; we live in Montreal, a very humid and hot area in the summer.

I'm told by the dealership it could be this summer or even later before the car is repaired. The dealer has been great about giving me the replacement vehicle to drive with no hassles, but very evasive when I've tried to push them on how to maintain my CRV in the meantime while it's sitting there doing nothing. I can't drive it to keep it in good working order because a) Honda made me sign something saying I would not drive it at all, and b) because as I confirmed with my car insurance company a couple of days ago, I'm not covered as long as I have this replacement vehicle. So if something should happen while I'm driving my CRV I could be in big trouble. So obviously, I'm not going to be driving it at all.


My worry is that the CRV will deteriorate if it's just parked for months on end. I recently replaced the battery, tires, and brakes so I'm not relishing the idea of the new brakes rusting and the battery dying from under-use. Has anybody confronted Honda Canada about what they're going to do for people if down the road, once we are driving our own cars again, there are problems due to being parked for so long? Does anybody have any advice for how to keep the CRV in good working order while waiting for this repair? I don't know much about cars except that parking them long term is not good for them -- that cars are meant to be driven, not left.

I'd really appreciate hearing from others on this. Thanks!
 

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It's still a relatively short time for it to be sitting. A vehicle might sit on the lot that long before being sold, for example. If it was sitting more than a year, I'd be concerned to consider some STABIL or something of that sort.

I don't think it will deteriorate or that you'll have any trouble. If she's home, maybe start it up for a bit every few months to charge the battery?

My former Rav4 (sold last week) sat for over 6 months, and started right up.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's still a relatively short time for it to be sitting. A vehicle might sit on the lot that long before being sold, for example. If it was sitting more than a year, I'd be concerned to consider some STABIL or something of that sort.

I don't think it will deteriorate or that you'll have any trouble. If she's home, maybe start it up for a bit every few months to charge the battery?

My former Rav4 (sold last week) sat for over 6 months, and started right up.
Thanks for your reply. Some friends have suggested disconnecting the battery for the duration. What do you think about that? Obviously I wouldn't be able to start it as you've suggested.
 

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OP, are you leaving your CR-V at the dealer for the duration (bad idea) or keeping it at home (better idea)? You can sign an agreement that allows you to keep it at home. That's what I did for my Ridgeline.

Click here to view a post on the Ridgeline Owner's Club regarding taking care of your vehicle during this recall (or any other time). Dealers simply will not do all these things no matter what they tell you.
 

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OP, are you leaving your CR-V at the dealer for the duration (bad idea) or keeping it at home (better idea)? You can sign an agreement that allows you to keep it at home. That's what I did for my Ridgeline.
I'm leaving the car at home; the dealer refused to keep it on the lot actually, which is just as well I suppose. Thanks for your reply though; I wrote to Honda Canada to ask about how to maintain the car and got no response.

Anyway your info gave me the idea to look at my own manual, and there's a similar, but much shorter, list of things to do when putting the car into storage. I've now disconnected the battery and the parking brake, and put blocks behind the rear wheels. The tank was almost full. That's about all I can do. There was nothing in my manual about putting in a fuel stabilizer. Anyway, it's too late, I can't drive the thing as it's not insured now.

I have to say this whole situation is a real pain in the arse.
 

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At minimum, I'd suggest keeping a battery maintainer connected to the battery since the battery will still discharge even when not connected to the vehicle. Once a month, reconnect the battery, start it up, and run the engine until it reaches operating temperature. Back it out and into the garage a few times if you don't want to risk driving it around the block. Even without a stabilizer, the fuel should still be good for at least a year with no problems. With any luck, it won't be in storage that long.
 
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