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This is my first post, so please be gentle. 馃ゴ

I've been looking at some and understand there are some problems with certain models. For example, 2017+ models have the gas/oil dilution issues on the 1.5L turbo engines. I've never liked things like turbos (or superchargers) on my daily driving vehicle. I understand the 2016 models come only with the 2.4 naturally-aspirated 4cyl, which has been known for it's reliability. But that is only the engine. There are also water-based paint issues with the same newer models. I've been to the Marysville, OH plant where that tech was introduced (though that was when I was living in OH back in the early 90). I'm wondering if there are any problem areas I should be aware of for the 2016 model year. I've read some of the posts, but I'm trying to get an overall senses of what to look for before making a purchase. I like Scotty Kilmer's channel on YouTube as he tends to be forthright with info about all kinds of makes & models.

What trim level would you recommend? I've looked at all of them: LX, EX, EX-L, & Touring models. I've driven all of them (exc the EX-L). I'm looking at AWD models as I live in N New England where we get tons of snow (though less as the years go by). I'm somewhat skeptical of too much technology because I'm not entirely comfortable with things like collision detection systems. When such systems fail it can really be costly in so many ways. One such way is vehicle repairs. I have a limited budget and do as much work myself. How hard is it to work on these vehicles, with the AWD and various options?

My current vehicle is a 99 Camry 4cyl, and while it still has a lot of life in it, the body doesn't. The rocker panels are rusted through, and underneath it's badly rusted. My fuel line looks very corroded. Yet it has served me faithfully and none of the repairs were over $500. Now I know that I can't expect that with newer vehicles, but I don't want to run into $1000+ repairs if possible. I understand nothing is guaranteed, but doing homework before purchase can certainly reduce one's chances of such incidents. That's why I'm here--to get some good advice from you all. Thanks!
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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Welcome to the forum! Moving to the Shopping and Test Driving section for better response. Let us know what you choose!
 

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2014 CRV EX-L FWD
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282 Posts
Allow me to offer my opinion: I had (and loved) a FWD 16 CRV SE (the SE was a gussied up stripper model). Many years before that I had a FWD 98 LX CRV.

Initially my qualms with the 2016 were with its' CVT - I had a poor opinion of it; turns out I loved its smoothness. My first caution: I found lots of scary torque steer if/ when you really mash the go pedal; and while I would have liked more amenities (higher trim level) I was in a hurry to replace my stolen/ wrecked prior vehicle - and this was the best buggy I could find at a reasonable price.

MODS: I added Wet Okole seat covers, front and rear - I found them only OK (they did move around a bit and weren't as comfy as others I've previously used). I also added WeatherTech window sills, no problems with the fronts however the rears both blew out / a very common complaint with that name brand when used on the rear windows. Double-sided 3M tape eventually solved the issue. I also installed a Rhino roof rack, mostly for the aggressive look it provided.

Unfortunately I decided after about 7 months that it was just too small for my use as a daily driver - And for my GSD who owned the rear seat (the reason for seat covers).

As for AWD vs FWD, my 98 FWD just tore up the snow while in Maine; while AWD would provide confidence I don't know if its required. Obviously AWD will cost you more upfront, slightly reduce your overall MPG and add increased service costs (with additional fluids needing to be changed).

As the chances are good that you'll own it for a long time my second caution is to ensure you can live with its limited space allowances - and with whatever choice you select in trim level.

Overall I loved them both, so much so that later this morning I'm picking up a FWD 2014 EX-L CRV - it'll be modded so I can flat tow it behind my coach.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Allow me to offer my opinion: I had (and loved) a FWD 16 CRV SE (the SE was a gussied up stripper model). Many years before that I had a FWD 98 LX CRV.

Initially my qualms with the 2016 were with its' CVT - I had a poor opinion of it; turns out I loved its smoothness. My first caution: I found lots of scary torque steer if/ when you really mash the go pedal; and while I would have liked more amenities (higher trim level) I was in a hurry to replace my stolen/ wrecked prior vehicle - and this was the best buggy I could find at a reasonable price.

MODS: I added Wet Okole seat covers, front and rear - I found them only OK (they did move around a bit and weren't as comfy as others I've previously used). I also added WeatherTech window sills, no problems with the fronts however the rears both blew out / a very common complaint with that name brand when used on the rear windows. Double-sided 3M tape eventually solved the issue. I also installed a Rhino roof rack, mostly for the aggressive look it provided.

Unfortunately I decided after about 7 months that it was just too small for my use as a daily driver - And for my GSD who owned the rear seat (the reason for seat covers).

As for AWD vs FWD, my 98 FWD just tore up the snow while in Maine; while AWD would provide confidence I don't know if its required. Obviously AWD will cost you more upfront, slightly reduce your overall MPG and add increased service costs (with additional fluids needing to be changed).

As the chances are good that you'll own it for a long time my second caution is to ensure you can live with its limited space allowances - and with whatever choice you select in trim level.

Overall I loved them both, so much so that later this morning I'm picking up a FWD 2014 EX-L CRV - it'll be modded so I can flat tow it behind my coach.
Thanks a bunch for sharing your experience! The EX-L is very nice. The LX was kinda bare bones in today's view, but coming from my 99 Camry it'd be considered luxury. LOL.

I think the Touring has lane-assist and 18" wheels. The dealer told me that it was a one-owner vehicle and has only 24K miles. I took it for a drive. Of course, it rode just like the other trim levels but I'm still not comfortable with the added tech. I think the only benefit would be possible lower insurance premiums due to it being considered safer. I've also compared the RAV4 as far as insurance and it's actually $30 more for me every six months. State Farm said the NHTSA safety ratings of the RAV4 were lower than the CR-V hence the lower premium.

Unfortunately this dealership only carries AWD models because they said the 2WD models don't sell. I'm in N Maine so I can understand to some degree because nearly everyone around here drives a 4WD truck or AWD SUV, whether needed or not. I've never owned either type and when I grew up in the 70s/80s in OH I drove only RWD cars. Yes, memories but also FUN. I'm no intimidated. My biggest issue with my Camry is that it's get stuck in the driveway because my driveway ices over (snow-rain cylcle are now more common here). Studded tires help but I really don't like the way they ride, plus the expense of having the tires mounted/dismounted, and that's on steel wheels. Definitely wouldn't want to do that with aluminum wheels.

Do you remember any expensive repairs with your CR-V, like perhaps with the drive-train or electronics? How much oil did it burn? How many miles do you have on it? Any problems iwht the navigation system? Consumer Reports, at the tie of its review, said the nav controls were confusing.

I really appreciate your help, thanks!
 

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2014 CRV EX-L FWD
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Both of my earlier owned CRVs were lower trim levels.

The 98 hung around for over a dozen years - it required a timing belt, numerous oil jobs, likely a battery that I've forgotten, a new windshield, and several sets of tires. This car provided my daughter great protection when she got squeezed (both sides) between a large vehicle and a semi-truck / Atlanta drivers. I got it pounded out, repainted and back on the road. My daughter eventually sold it at just short of 200K wonderful miles.

Other than gas and depreciation my 16 didn't cost me anything (I traded it before the first service was needed) - it ran around 32-33 mpg. Loved the car - just a wrong fit for me.

My new 14 EX-L is now in my yard; fixing to spend Big Bucks getting it set up to be flat towed (tomorrow):
 

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The 2016 engine may very rarely vibrate a little at idle, but if you turn on the headlight or air-conditioning the engine computer does not go to the extra low fuel conserving idle RPMs that may cause that problem.

I looked at the videos on YouTube (haven't done any work on it yet myself, only bought my 2016 CR-V EX mid February 2020, and have 2 free oil changes from the dealer), but the location of the oil drain plug and filter are super easy to get too. You could probably do it without jacking the vehicle up. There is a panel under the vehicle to improve air flow that has to be removed, and put back on. Also on YouTube there are videos showing that the CV-T transmission fluid and rear-end differential fluid are extremely easy to do. The first O2 sensor is very easy to get to, the second one does require you to remove the front passengers seat to get to the connection for the clip for the wires, but that is not that hard of a job.

There are YouTube videos on how to fold down the back seats, They are extremely easy to fold down, or put back up.

In normal drive mode "D" CR-V's are geared to get the best MPGs, and the CVT keeps it that way regardless of the speed. If you stomp on it it will go very well, but if you really want it to accelerate, or have a lot of get-up-and-go you should shift it into S (sport) mode, preferably before you are going to be demanding the extra acceleration such as before you accelerate on a highway entrance ramp, or before you go up a steep hill. It even has a L (low) mode, but that is so low that you probably should only use when you are going to go up an extremely steep hill slowly.

I would not buy the base LX model because I does not have the camera under the right side mirror that is very handy to see if there is any vehicle in your blind spot when you change from the left lane to the right lane. I do not know if the SE model has that option, but if it does not, I would not buy one.

If you are into boom-boom base in your audio system, you want the EX-L or touring. They have a big base speaker in the front of the drivers seat. The EX and lower models do not have that.

The EX and above (EX-L, touring) have six way power drivers seat, with adjustable lumbar support, and heated seat and lumbar area. You can turn the heated seat off or on and there are two heat settings for on.

The EX has cloth seats.

The EX-L and touring have leather seats, and an automatic day/night adjusting rear view mirror. The EX and lower models do not have this.

When buying a used one, the power tailgate was an option on the models below touring, so a used one may or may not have it. It is a nice option to have, especially now with curbside grocery pick-up. There are companies that sell retro fit kits to add it, but it is not an easy job.

If you are going to work on your own vehicle you really should get torque wrenches and only tighten the oil drain bolts and other bolts to the specified torque, and always use a new crush washer. To keep the weight down and get better gas millage many things are made of aluminum, an aluminum does not tolerate over-tightening. The threads will strip. NAPA sells good torque wrenches at a good price. You should always set them to 0 when not in use so the spring in them stays in calibration.

I bought a 1/2 torque wrench to tighten the wheel lugs if I ever get a flat, and keep that with a short extension and 17 mm socket inside a small carpet rolled up beside the spare, with a 4 way in an other small carpet on top of the spare. Never use a torque wrench to loosen lugs.

The rear end fluid should be changed every 15K miles. And only use the Honda Duel Pump type II fluid for it. It takes 2 quarts. You can buy a cheap pump that fits the quart bottles on e-bay. Look on YouTube, it is super easy to do. Always loosen the fill bolt before draining, to be sure you will be able to get it loose before you drain it. You do not want to drain, and then find out you can't get the fill loose.

In general the from what I have seen on YouTube and read, the 2016 Honda CR-V is super easy to work on, and very reliable.

You should change the CVT fluid every 25K to 30K miles. 25K for severe use (a lot of stop and go, and or hills). 30K for easy driving (a lot of highway). I plan to only use Honda fluid on mine. The AWD version holds more fluid than the FWD version. You will need 5 quarts for a AWD, and 4 for a FWD. Watch several of the YouTube videos, there are a few steps that some of them do not show, but if you watch several you will see everything.
 

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Corrections of above post, should read LX model because it, and that is 1/2 inch torque wrench

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Another options that used CR-Vs may have or not have are Honda remote start, and upgraded floor mats. Mine came with both of those. The remote has a very good range and I understand it cost the original owner more that $600.00 the upgraded Honda floor mats are not that great. I probably will buy a front set of Weather-Tech floor mats with the high edges option before winter to keep the melted snow from getting everywhere.

The interior lighting in my EX is not all that good, especially with black seats and black dash. I upgraded with the LEDs from Precision LED (interior package only both center front, and dome center between front and back seats, and the trunk light, cost about $46.00 and it made a world of difference). I know they are expensive for 4 bulbs, but usually LEDs last a very long time, and with C-19 I did not want to take it to the local interior shop to have lights added, and now with the LED bulbs putting out a heck of a lot more light I can actually see items inside of the vehicle where-ever they may be at night. Before I could not do that.

If you have any questions, you can PM me on BITOG under the user name JimPghPA or e-mail me at [email protected]
 

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If you buy yours from a Honda dealer and it comes with a certified Honda warranty, DO NOT buy the extended warranty. It is not a good deal. With the Certified warranty you already have (7 years from the day of sale to the original owner, or up to 100,000 miles) (on the power train).

And you get (1 year or 48,000 miles on the vehicles odometer) on the rest of the vehicle.

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With the extended they are selling you the same (7 years FROM THE DAY OF THE SALE TO THE ORIGINAL OWNER, or 100,000 miles) ( on the power train). Which you already have with the Certified warranty.

And only up to 7 YEARS FROM THE DAY OF SALE TO THE ORIGINAL OWNER, on the rest of the vehicle. So now that would be for about 3 years depending on what that date was, but you already have 1 year with the Certified warranty.

So what they are really selling you is ONLY about 2 years on the non-power train. And for $2669.00 this is not a good deal.

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If an expensive electronic component goes out like the dash-board (which is not likely) you should be able to get second hand ones for a lower price than Honda wants for them, from salvage yards like StoysTown Auto Salvage in Pennsylvania, that will UPS a part to you. Honda sold 359,673 2016 CR-Vs in the United States. Used parts are going to be around for them for a long time. They are like the Chevy Impala was in previous years, they are everywhere. There are a heck of a lot of them.
 

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A torque wrench in the vehicle to tighten wheel lugs if you get a flat is a good idea in any modern vehicle. Modern vehicles are more prone to warping the brake rotors if the lugs are over-tightened or not all tightened to near the same amount. This is not just with Honda, it is something that can happen with many vehicles now days. A 1/2 drive torque wrench has a long enough handle that it is not hard to use. The proper lug-nut torque speck of a 2016 Honda CR-V is 80 Lb/Ft You are better off buying a low price manual torque wrench such as the EverCraft sold at NAPA than an expensive electronic one that has batteries that may have gone dead by the time you go to use it. Always set torque wrenches to 0 when not in use so there is no tension on the spring so it stays in calibration. Never use a torque wrench to loosen lug-nuts. A 4 way is the best thing to have to loosen lug-nuts. You want to use a short 1/2 inch drive extension and a six-point 17mm socket, or a six-point 3/4 inch socket with your 1/2 inch torque wrench on a Honda CR-V.

On a 4 way tire iron 3/4 inch is also used for 17 mm lugs. There is only a couple of 1/1000s of an inch difference from a 3/4 inch socket and a 17 mm.
 

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I will buy a 3/8 inch drive, and a 1/4 inch drive, torque wrench before I start doing my own work on my CRV so I have torque wrenches with ranges good for the smaller bolts and drain, and fill plugs.
 

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The dealer put a new set (all 4) of tires on mine before I bought it. They chose a really great all season tire. It is the BF Goodrich T/A Sport LT with the three peak mountain snow-flake symbol rating. (Not all BF Goodrich T/A Sport have that rating. Older ones do not have it. It is only recent improvements in both the rubber compound and the design of the swipes that enable it to have both the summer sport rating, and the TPMS symbol rating. A review on the online tire store tire-rack shows that this tire scored a 8.9 and the Bridgestone Blizzak WS-90 there latest winter tire scored a 9.3 so it is not that far behind a dedicated winter only tire in its winter performance, and the BF Goodrich is an all season so I no longer have to keep two complete sets of tires and change sets twice a year. The TPMS symbol rating is a big deal on an all season. I look forward to using these next winter. The YouTube videos of other SUVs using this tire last winter in snow show that it really goes in snow, and is should have some grip on ice.
 

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If you are looking for an all season tire, from what the YouTube videos show, and the TireRack review that BF Goodrich is a very good choice.
 

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Hi gang, just checked something. It is the 19 mm that is only 2/1000 of an inch difference from a3/4 inch socket, and it is the 19 mm that is the correct size 6 point socket to use on a 2016 CR-V lug-nut, but since the 3/4 inch is only 2/1000 of an inch bigger is would be perfectly fine to use a six point socket or 4 way tire iron on it. Sorry for the mistake, I knew I remembered that the 3/4 inch was basically the same size as the correct lug-nut socket, (2/1000 of an inch is less than the thickness of a human hair) but initially I did remember the wrong size metric socket. I is and should have been 19mm
 

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The 2016 engine may very rarely vibrate a little at idle, but if you turn on the headlight or air-conditioning the engine computer does not go to the extra low fuel conserving idle RPMs that may cause that problem.

I looked at the videos on YouTube (haven't done any work on it yet myself, only bought my 2016 CR-V EX mid February 2020, and have 2 free oil changes from the dealer), but the location of the oil drain plug and filter are super easy to get too. You could probably do it without jacking the vehicle up. There is a panel under the vehicle to improve air flow that has to be removed, and put back on. Also on YouTube there are videos showing that the CV-T transmission fluid and rear-end differential fluid are extremely easy to do. The first O2 sensor is very easy to get to, the second one does require you to remove the front passengers seat to get to the connection for the clip for the wires, but that is not that hard of a job.

There are YouTube videos on how to fold down the back seats, They are extremely easy to fold down, or put back up.

In normal drive mode "D" CR-V's are geared to get the best MPGs, and the CVT keeps it that way regardless of the speed. If you stomp on it it will go very well, but if you really want it to accelerate, or have a lot of get-up-and-go you should shift it into S (sport) mode, preferably before you are going to be demanding the extra acceleration such as before you accelerate on a highway entrance ramp, or before you go up a steep hill. It even has a L (low) mode, but that is so low that you probably should only use when you are going to go up an extremely steep hill slowly.

I would not buy the base LX model because I does not have the camera under the right side mirror that is very handy to see if there is any vehicle in your blind spot when you change from the left lane to the right lane. I do not know if the SE model has that option, but if it does not, I would not buy one.

If you are into boom-boom base in your audio system, you want the EX-L or touring. They have a big base speaker in the front of the drivers seat. The EX and lower models do not have that.

The EX and above (EX-L, touring) have six way power drivers seat, with adjustable lumbar support, and heated seat and lumbar area. You can turn the heated seat off or on and there are two heat settings for on.

The EX has cloth seats.

The EX-L and touring have leather seats, and an automatic day/night adjusting rear view mirror. The EX and lower models do not have this.

When buying a used one, the power tailgate was an option on the models below touring, so a used one may or may not have it. It is a nice option to have, especially now with curbside grocery pick-up. There are companies that sell retro fit kits to add it, but it is not an easy job.

If you are going to work on your own vehicle you really should get torque wrenches and only tighten the oil drain bolts and other bolts to the specified torque, and always use a new crush washer. To keep the weight down and get better gas millage many things are made of aluminum, an aluminum does not tolerate over-tightening. The threads will strip. NAPA sells good torque wrenches at a good price. You should always set them to 0 when not in use so the spring in them stays in calibration.

I bought a 1/2 torque wrench to tighten the wheel lugs if I ever get a flat, and keep that with a short extension and 17 mm socket inside a small carpet rolled up beside the spare, with a 4 way in an other small carpet on top of the spare. Never use a torque wrench to loosen lugs.

The rear end fluid should be changed every 15K miles. And only use the Honda Duel Pump type II fluid for it. It takes 2 quarts. You can buy a cheap pump that fits the quart bottles on e-bay. Look on YouTube, it is super easy to do. Always loosen the fill bolt before draining, to be sure you will be able to get it loose before you drain it. You do not want to drain, and then find out you can't get the fill loose.

In general the from what I have seen on YouTube and read, the 2016 Honda CR-V is super easy to work on, and very reliable.

You should change the CVT fluid every 25K to 30K miles. 25K for severe use (a lot of stop and go, and or hills). 30K for easy driving (a lot of highway). I plan to only use Honda fluid on mine. The AWD version holds more fluid than the FWD version. You will need 5 quarts for a AWD, and 4 for a FWD. Watch several of the YouTube videos, there are a few steps that some of them do not show, but if you watch several you will see everything.
On my 2016 touring model the air dam does not have to be removed the panel stops short of the filter and drain plug. This is my 3rd CRV 1997, 2014 and this 2016 all were bought new. I have done every single oil change and it would be really difficult changing oil without ramps. I have found there is a heat shield that goes above the exhaust under where the shifter is located that is made with plastic and thin tin and the tin will rattle causing a vibrating "eeerrrring"sound on certain roads. I have taken closed cell foam and stuffed behind the shield and no more annoying sound. You would have thought honda would have figured that out. Also rear diff is around every 45,000 on my 2016 and tranny every 90,000 unless driving in extreme conditions or towing etc. These are about when the milage minders will notify you. I am at 39000 miles and no mm yet. I am going off what my old neighbor who is a honda tech said they generally come on at.
 

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The fluid for the CVT should be changed at every 30K miles for a vehicle that has been driven on regular roads, or earlier at every 25K miles for vehicles that are driven on harsh conditions such as a lot of stop and go, and or a lot of hills. And when the fluid is drained and filled you are only replacing 1/2 the fluid. 1/2 of the old fluid stays in the CVT transmission and mixes with the new fluid.

The rear-end fluid should be changed every 15K miles. If you let it go too long the clutches in the rear-end may not slip the proper amount when you go around bends or turns and the back tires may chirp or skip while you are turning. There is a fix for this. You change the rear-end fluid and then find a big parking lot without obstructions and drive backwards making both left and right circles until the rear end does not chirp or skip.

Your Honda dealer can provide you with information showing when the CVT and rear-end fluid should be changed. Just because the MM did on go off, does not mean you are OK running it more than the above maintenance miles.
 

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2016 CRV Touring AWD
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Well as a 16 Touring owner, let me share that I nearly got the EXL, but was seduced by the automated cruise tech. Its a really good system that takes time to learn.

That said, there is a thread here where EX/EXL owners can update their radios to have carplay, while Touring owners can't. I use the car's nav system every time I'm in the car, but dang, I'd use google/waze over Honda anytime.

So I'll say EX/EXL.
 
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