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While driving at 87 for several hours the CR-V is quiet and very easy to control. I do not know the RPM but it's not 5,000.

The CR-V is very quick when accelerating from 75 to 100 to pass slow-pokes then settles in at 87 again nicely.

My only point was quoting that the 'Hybrid would be uncomfortable above 65 for extended periods of time' (paraphrased).

I have NO complaints about the MPG I get while driving at legal speeds (they must be legal or the State Police in MT, ID and UT I went past with their radar's on would have pulled me over).

If I ever plan upon purchasing a Hybrid I will HAVE to take it on the highway and run it for 10 minutes or so.
 

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...

If I ever plan upon purchasing a Hybrid I will HAVE to take it on the highway and run it for 10 minutes or so.
THIS, or a longer highway test drive should be done with ANY vehicle purchased.
 
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After many fill-ups with 30 mpg (around town in San Jose, CA area in winter) averages...I got 38.6 mpg (around town in the Phoenix, AZ area also in winter). Contributing to the increase I believe is the following: 1) increased tire pressure (after warning light) to 35 psi from 30 psi, 2) longer trips (say 10+ mile averages from 5+ miles), 3) say 10 degrees warmer, and 4) possibly the non-CA gas.
Ah yes, this was also something new to me: the so-called TPMS system in the newer Hondas!

My wife's 2016 Civic EX-T and our 2020 CR-V Hybrid both have a TPMS that really only measures if one of the tires is noticeably off round from the others; it's differential based, not measuring an actual PSI reading per tire the way my 2007 and 2008 Acura vehicles do/had done (a TSX sedan and an MDX SUV). So when the tire pressure drops due to the ambient temperature dropping from 50F to 25F (according to Boyle's Law and all), if all four tires drop equally, it doesn't report it as a problem on the HUD.

Long story short, about two weeks after my TSX had notified me that a few of my tires had dropped from 34-35 PSI to 26-28 PSI when the recent very cold weather set in, I thought to check the CR-V (which had never complained), and the tires were all at 24-26 PSI. Which definitely affects fuel economy, running on underinflated tires!
 

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Well, I would say driving the CR-V Hybrid actually at 65 MPH exactly is fine. That's actually what I set my ACC to now in mine, if driving on an uncongested highway for a significant amount of time, and resign myself to following a truck instead of passing it (going between 60-65 MPH and letting the ACC do its thing), occasionally manually stepping on the gas to pass someone on the left at around 70-75 MPH and then falling back after passing.

But setting the ACC to 75 MPH for an hour or longer was aurally exhausting to me. I also noticed a big difference in fuel economy setting the ACC to 65 rather than 70 MPH, so once I'm below 75 I may as we ll be at 65, as 70 still feels "kind of slow" and going 65 gets me something like 3 MPG better.

The mantra of Hybrid highway driving: I'm valuing comfort, fuel-efficiency, being environmentally friendly, and I am not in a hurry! Repeat it until it feels like I believe it! (And then driving around locally off the highway, I can drive "normally" and feel like I have better than average performance with above-average or well-above-average fuel economy, depending on the length of my drives!)

I have also drafted semis (Setting ACC and follow distance at 1 bar and staying behind Semi trucks) to increase my mileage further. I went 200 miles @ a speed somewhere around 70 and at 40 mpg by drafting a semi that was going around 70.

It's either the UK (winter) fuel, or the CRV Hybrid itself is different from their US counterparts, or both. I have no other explanation why driving at 40 mph average (roughly 30% urban+suburban, 5% Blue Ridge mountains, 50% country roads 45-55 mph and 15% interstate 65-70 mph) I've been getting 32.5 mpg all winter.
I've also been getting this mileage all winter and it is frustrating. My last fill up 60/40 highway city I got 34 mpg. It just sucks....
 

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In the past couple of days the temperature has climbed into the 50's Fahrenheit (>10C), and a miracle happened: my average went up above 40 mpg US (48 mpg UK) - on the same circuit I was getting 30-32 mpg US (36-38 mpg UK) when it was around freezing.

Today at 52F (11C) I clocked a remarkable 50 mpg US (60 mpg UK) in normal city traffic.

I am still looking for a good explanation to this phenomenon.
 

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In the past couple of days the temperature has climbed into the 50's Fahrenheit (>10C), and a miracle happened: my average went up above 40 mpg US (48 mpg UK) - on the same circuit I was getting 30-32 mpg US (36-38 mpg UK) when it was around freezing.

Today at 52F (11C) I clocked a remarkable 50 mpg US (60 mpg UK) in normal city traffic.


I am still looking for a good explanation to this phenomenon.
Seems normal, as 50+ Fahrenheit is considerably above freezing.


According to the U.S. Department of Energy, fuel economy tests show, in short-trip city driving, a conventional gasoline car’s gas mileage is about 12 percent lower at 20 degrees Fahrenheit than it would be at 77 degrees Fahrenheit. It can drop as much as 22 percent for very short trips, around 3 to 4 miles.

The effect on hybrid cars is worse; their fuel economy can drop about 31 percent to 34 percent under the cold and wintry conditions.
Even if your "circuit" is longer than 3-4 miles, other factors like how much and how high you run your heat matter.

Hybrid cars are MORE sensitive to cold weather (in terms of taking a hit to fuel economy) than ICE powered ones; and you should already have known that an ICE based car always gets significantly worse mileage in freezing or sub-freezing temperatures. (Or did you only start looking at your MPG like a hawk after buying a vehicle that touted it as its major reason for purchasing it?).

If it's any comfort, a full EV also takes a big hit in range in freezing temperatures.


You want something that stays even or gets better MPG with the onset of winter weather? This is your best option!

 

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Today at 52F (11C) I clocked a remarkable 50 mpg US (60 mpg UK) in normal city traffic.

I am still looking for a good explanation to this phenomenon.
If evidence were needed what affects fuel economy, the answer lies right there in front of you.
 
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In the past couple of days the temperature has climbed into the 50's Fahrenheit (>10C), and a miracle happened: my average went up above 40 mpg US (48 mpg UK) - on the same circuit I was getting 30-32 mpg US (36-38 mpg UK) when it was around freezing.

Today at 52F (11C) I clocked a remarkable 50 mpg US (60 mpg UK) in normal city traffic.

I am still looking for a good explanation to this phenomenon.
I saw the same phenomena. Yesterday morning and the evening before I got unremarkable mileage of around 34 MPG. Temps in the low 30's then yesterday afternoon bright sunshine brought everything up to 65 F. I got over 40 MPG on my normal route home. it is obviously because of the weather. Also wet conditions produce significant drag on the car I have noticed. If there is any mystery it is obvious what the cause is, Cold temperatures and wet conditions.
 

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If there is any mystery it is obvious what the cause is, Cold temperatures and wet conditions.
Cold definitely and I assume wet to a certain extent because of the wipers, CC heater etc but cold is the dominant factor. If it was rain owners in the UK would be lucky to push 30mpg.

Media is currently full of EV car range drastically reducing because of cold. Obviously not as problematic to the Hybrid but you can see where the problem is by association.
 

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Cold definitely and I assume wet to a certain extent because of the wipers, CC heater etc but cold is the dominant factor. If it was rain owners in the UK would be lucky to push 30mpg.

Media is currently full of EV car range drastically reducing because of cold. Obviously not as problematic to the Hybrid but you can see where the problem is by association.
Hybrids have an ICE, which converts at least 60% (probably 80%) of the chemical energy of the fuel into waste heat. This makes huge difference. This "free" heat (in fact, prepaid at the gas station) is used to heat the cab and, in the same breath, the traction battery (at least it does in the little Prius I had). The ICE warms up very quickly, and its efficiency is no longer affected by the outside temperature.

In a pure BEV, the traction battery has to keep warm both itself and the passengers. In addition, the battery has a huge surface, and its outer shell is exposed to the cooling effect of the high velocity cold air + water droplets in it, which makes it even harder to keep it warm.

In a Bolt, on an approx. 50 mi drive a typical winter energy consumption for cab heating and battery "conditioning" was 13% and 4% respectively (quoting from memory).

These things are somewhat alleviated by using more advanced battery temperature management systems, heat pumps for cab heating instead of resistive heaters, and harvesting the waste heat of the motors and the power electronics. But, not too many EV's do that.
 

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Took a long ride today with mixed driving conditions (local/highway) and returned with excellent fuel economy. Gives me something to look forward to when things get warmer for longer periods of time.

145535
 

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Merged MPG related topics.
 

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Hybrids have an ICE, which converts at least 60% (probably 80%) of the chemical energy of the fuel into waste heat. This makes huge difference. This "free" heat (in fact, prepaid at the gas station) is used to heat the cab and, in the same breath, the traction battery (at least it does in the little Prius I had). The ICE warms up very quickly, and its efficiency is no longer affected by the outside temperature.

In a pure BEV, the traction battery has to keep warm both itself and the passengers. In addition, the battery has a huge surface, and its outer shell is exposed to the cooling effect of the high velocity cold air + water droplets in it, which makes it even harder to keep it warm.

In a Bolt, on an approx. 50 mi drive a typical winter energy consumption for cab heating and battery "conditioning" was 13% and 4% respectively (quoting from memory).

These things are somewhat alleviated by using more advanced battery temperature management systems, heat pumps for cab heating instead of resistive heaters, and harvesting the waste heat of the motors and the power electronics. But, not too many EV's do that.
Most of us are not going 50 miles to work and back which is the majority of driving that I do. In my experience the ICE takes 5-10 min to warm up to operating temp in winter conditions, that's with most any car I have driven. But when my commute is 15 miles and takes 20 minutes that = a pretty shitty trip average Mpg for the CRV in cold conditions. Warmer weather however it has much less of an issue getting to temperature and mileage is MUCH better. Even in hot conditions the AC does not seem to really pull the Mpg down very much. It really is much more affected by the cold and having to warm everything up.
 

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Merged threads into one MPG-related thread for Hybrid discussion.
 

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Purely anecdotal, as there are too many variables to measure when looking at mpg, but after my 6th fill up all from the same station (5th measured- didn't use data from the dealers first fuel up) My first two tanks driven purely in eco mode averaged about 2mpg lower than my last two fillips in the default mode, and the info readout seems to be lower than actual by 1.1mpg, 6th and 7th tank will be in sport mode exclusively.
 

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there are too many variables to measure when looking at mpg
Precisely. Matters not what engine you have under the hood - OEM test numbers are a far cry from real world numbers because of the unrealistic test conditions applied.
 

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Purely anecdotal, as there are too many variables to measure when looking at mpg ...
Agree 100%. And until temps are consistently above about 50°F (10°C), its effect is probably more than anything else. In other words, you shouldn't draw any conclusions if temps vary across that point.

... but after my 6th fill up all from the same station (5th measured- didn't use data from the dealers first fuel up) My first two tanks driven purely in eco mode averaged about 2mpg lower than my last two fillips in the default mode, and the info readout seems to be lower than actual by 1.1mpg, 6th and 7th tank will be in sport mode exclusively.
Is mine the only Honda that has an "N" on the "ECON" Button?

But I can share some info about ECON/NORMAL/SPORT in my Accord Hybrid. This was actually a response to a forum poster who thought he had a strategy for controlling speed. But I used it under very controlled circumstances, so I believe it measures the differences between the modes better than his strategy. It was a ten-mile loop over suburban roads (where he thought his strategy worked), but I made sure the car was warm before I started, and the battery was in the exact same state-of-charge at the beginnings and ends (I could do this because of hills near where I live).

ECON Mode, 55.0 MPG:
145551


NORMAL Mode, 54.1 MPG:
145550


SPORT Mode, 48.9 MPG:
145552


I should point out that the trip computer typically reads 3% low, so add about 1.5 mpg to these figures. And the route was ear-ideal for a hybrid, so it performed better than the 47 mpg EPA rating.
 

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Most of us are not going 50 miles to work and back which is the majority of driving that I do. In my experience the ICE takes 5-10 min to warm up to operating temp in winter conditions, that's with most any car I have driven. But when my commute is 15 miles and takes 20 minutes that = a pretty shitty trip average Mpg for the CRV in cold conditions. Warmer weather however it has much less of an issue getting to temperature and mileage is MUCH better. Even in hot conditions the AC does not seem to really pull the Mpg down very much. It really is much more affected by the cold and having to warm everything up.
I do drive more than the hypothetical average driver in the US, but I believe my driving patterns and driving conditions are close to those used in the EPA mpg determination methodology.

In Blanda the engine indeed takes good 5 to 10 minutes to warm up, but let's say the F-150 and the Accent I had used to start spewing warm air maybe a couple of minutes into a trip.

The AC didn't use to take a lot of energy in the Prius I had, so I don't expect Blanda to suffer from that either, but that said, in Priuses the compressor is driven not by the engine, but by an electric motor, which is supposed to be more economical.
 

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The AC didn't use to take a lot of energy in the Prius I had, so I don't expect Blanda to suffer from that either, but that said, in Priuses the compressor is driven not by the engine, but by an electric motor, which is supposed to be more economical.
Sorry but your repeated references to the Prius are not relevant.

This thread is about the MPG of the CR-V Hybrid, not "Prius".
 
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