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2020 CR-V EX-L Hybrid
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The AC didn't use to take a lot of energy in the Prius I had, so I don't expect Blanda to suffer from that either, but that said, in Priuses the compressor is driven not by the engine, but by an electric motor, which is supposed to be more economical.
The Hybrid CR-V AC compressor is also electric.
 

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The Hybrid CR-V AC compressor is also electric.
Good to know, thanks for the info. This means it's going to be economical.

Sorry but your repeated references to the Prius are not relevant.

This thread is about the MPG of the CR-V Hybrid, not "Prius".
Why sorry? It turns out that CRV H and Prius both utilize an electric motor to drive the AC compressor, which makes them more efficient in the summer? I think all cars should have that, just put a bigger 12V battery to handle the extra load.
 

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Why sorry?
As mentioned, its about the CR-V Hybrid MPG. Not Prius. This thread is not to compare the two or any other.

Thanks.
 

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You need to drive this hybrid long enough for the battery to reach ideal operating temperature to see it have the designed benefit.

I just took an ideal Hybrid-type trip: one leg of 45 minutes of mostly local city driving with a stretch of congested, rain slowed highway driving (30-50 MPH), two people in the car. (I'm sitting in it right now, waiting for my passenger to come back for the return leg.)

The car exterior thermometer showed 45F (7C) when I started; the cabin was set to 68F with the defogger, no seat heaters though.

My car is parked outdoors (no heated garage for me).

I reset my Trip Meter B to start from zero, and after N minutes of driving on this trip, this was the dashboard MPG readout.

You can see it is terrible to start off with in cold weather until about 20 minutes in, and this is at 45F, not long ago it was usually 25-30F when starting (about -1 or -2 C).

05 - 13.4 (from cold start)
10 - 18.2
15 - 21.4
20 - 24.2
25 - 28.6 (I turned off the heat about now)
30 - 30.2
35 - 31.6
40 - 32.0
45 - 32.4

And even in the summer, I remember watching the MPG rise after a reset and it would still need 10 minutes to get up to just 23-24 MPG, and 20 minutes to get up to 30 MPG.

Note that those MPG figures are the then given dash readout for the entire trip, not the "instantaneous fuel economy rate". So the last 15 minutes had to be WAY more efficient than 32.4 MPG to average out to that rate, seeing how bad it was after the first 15 minutes.

And I believe that EPA testing is done indoors on a warmed up car.

UPDATED: On my return trip 2 hours later, it was now 51F, and the rain had stopped so traffic was a bit lighter (5 minutes faster):

05 - 17.4
10 - 28.1
15 - 29.0
20 - 31.0
25 - 33.3
30 - 33.8
35 - 33.8
40 - 34.4

I guess the battery was still somewhat warm from the earlier trip even 2 hours later, as clearly it became more efficient much sooner than on my outbound leg!
 

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CRV-Hybrid EX (actually, my ex is a Prius)
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As mentioned, its about the CR-V Hybrid MPG. Not Prius. This thread is not to compare the two or any other.

Thanks.
You are welcome :).
You need to drive this hybrid long enough for the battery to reach ideal operating temperature to see it have the designed benefit.

I just took an ideal Hybrid-type trip: one leg of 45 minutes of mostly local city driving with a stretch of congested, rain slowed highway driving (30-50 MPH), two people in the car. (I'm sitting in it right now, waiting for my passenger to come back for the return leg.)

The car exterior thermometer showed 45F (7C) when I started; the cabin was set to 68F with the defogger, no seat heaters though.

My car is parked outdoors (no heated garage for me).

I reset my Trip Meter B to start from zero, and after N minutes of driving on this trip, this was the dashboard MPG readout.

You can see it is terrible to start off with in cold weather until about 20 minutes in, and this is at 45F, not long ago it was usually 25-30F when starting (about -1 or -2 C).

05 - 13.4 (from cold start)
10 - 18.2
15 - 21.4
20 - 24.2
25 - 28.6 (I turned off the heat about now)
30 - 30.2
35 - 31.6
40 - 32.0
45 - 32.4

And even in the summer, I remember watching the MPG rise after a reset and it would still need 10 minutes to get up to just 23-24 MPG, and 20 minutes to get up to 30 MPG.

Note that those MPG figures are the then given dash readout for the entire trip, not the "instantaneous fuel economy rate". So the last 15 minutes had to be WAY more efficient than 32.4 MPG to average out to that rate, seeing how bad it was after the first 15 minutes.

And I believe that EPA testing is done indoors on a warmed up car.

UPDATED: On my return trip 2 hours later, it was now 51F, and the rain had stopped so traffic was a bit lighter (5 minutes faster):

05 - 17.4
10 - 28.1
15 - 29.0
20 - 31.0
25 - 33.3
30 - 33.8
35 - 33.8
40 - 34.4

I guess the battery was still somewhat warm from the earlier trip even 2 hours later, as clearly it became more efficient much sooner than on my outbound leg!
This is good data to know, thanks for sharing.

BTW, the main reason for the electric AC compressor is to allow the AC to cool while the ICE is not running. It might get awful hot during summer in the cabin at stop lights if it was belt driven.
More than one benefit, then. I can't help wondering why all cars aren't at least mild hybrid, like the erstwhile Gen2 Insight.
 

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BTW, the main reason for the electric AC compressor is to allow the AC to cool while the ICE is not running. It might get awful hot during summer in the cabin at stop lights if it was belt driven.
 
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BTW, the main reason for the electric AC compressor is to allow the AC to cool while the ICE is not running. It might get awful hot during summer in the cabin at stop lights if it was belt driven.
Also you don't have to screw with changing stupid belts all the time when they wear out.
 

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Mentioned by whom? It’s wrong, but the gullible seem to want it to be true.

All of the energy used to drive the CR-V hybrid comes from gas. What makes the hybrid fuel efficient, is running the ICE as close to 2,000 rpm and 88.5 lb-ft of torque as possible. That’s just under 34 horsepower. The ICE is 40.6% efficient there, and you will not find a car that can consistently run its ICE as efficiently as these Honda hybrids.

The problem is, you seldom can use exactly 34 horsepower. The reason these Hondas can stay closer to max efficiency is that they have a battery that is used as a buffer for energy. When the car needs less than 34 horsepower, the excess is sent to the battery. When it needs more, some is taken out.


And this is usually “mentioned” by people who think you should have bought a battery electric vehicle (BEV), or that don’t understand anything about how hybrids work. This includes most car reviewers.

I can't seem to repeat or emphasize this enough: How far the car can drive “in full EV mode” is completely irrelevant. In fact, it’s a bad idea to try to increase it. There are more losses in the electrical path that goes through the battery, than in the electrical path that goes directly from the generator to the motor. The only reason the battery path is used, is because you typically spend more time generating too much energy, than needing more.


No, they can’t.
And different publications list the motor’s (and so the vehicle's) torque range differently. Few are accurate. Max torque is essentially constant from 0 rpms up to where the power equals the max-rated power of the motor, 181 HP. Above that speed, the max power is constant. So the motor's (not the ICE's) ideal torque specification is 232.1 lb-ft from 0 to 4096 rpm, and 181*5252/RPM above that. In the Accord, 4096 rpm is about 36 mph.

The 212 horsepower is the maximum that can be generated by the components that are producing power at any given time. That will be the ICE-driven generator and the battery (which is why the max ICE horsepower, and the max net horsepower, both occur with the ICE at 6,200 rpm). The 181 HP motor would be drawing from these power sources, and so doesn’t contribute to the 212 number.

Incidentally, the ICE’s 129 lb-ft of torque is an irrelevant number. It will never be used to directly drive the wheels at that level. Only the power it produces has significance.



It feels nicely powerful because it is a 181 HP electric vehicle in those situations. The only differences between it and a Tesla, are that it isn't absurdly over-powered, and that it gets electricity from a generator as well as a battery.


Peak ICE power is at 6,200 rpm. But it never applies in engine drive mode.

The point of engine drive is that the gear ratio is chosen so you can leave the ICE near that 2,000 rpm speed, and skip the use of the generator. In the Accord, that’s 54 mph (I haven’t figured it for the CR-V which has a different gear ratio and tire diameter, but it should be close enough to ignore the difference). This skips electrical losses; but now the traction motor is used to buffer energy to the battery.



75 mph would be 2800 rpm in Engine Drive in the Accord, and it could generate up to 110 HP. But optimum efficiency would be at about 50 HP. If it needs much more, it would drop into hybrid mode.
Finally... Someone who really understands how the hybrid powertrain works in both the Accord (bought my son a 2020 Accord Hybrid) and the CRV. You are absolutely correct in stating that the ICE never powers the wheels. It sends the power needed directly to the two electric motors and any excess is sent to the battery. Your max 181 hp rating is correct and to get anywhere near the supposedly rated 212 hp you would theoretically have to exceed a speed of 100+ mph. This is my wife's vehicle and most of her driving is city/suburban with very few superhighway trips. In this type of driving this vehicle is much more fun to drive than the 1.5T. Also, Honda tuned the suspension a little tighter in the Hybrid than in the 1.5T Trim. We traded the wife's 2015 RAV4 Limited for this one. I hated that vehicle. Cramped, noisy at all speeds, and, the seat were horrible. Like I said, I hated that vehicle. I didn't buy this for it to be a speed demon. However, here in Texas we drive 75 to 85 on most of our highways (even the ones posted at 60 to 65) and I don't feel the CRV to be that noisy or underpowered. I've always have music playing at a reasonable volume so I'm not concentrating on road or engine noise. The only thing I have to get used to is the transmission because it doesn't "kick down" when you tromp it like a normal transmission. However, there isn't many times we are on two lane roads that force me to pass in a hurry. My main daily driver is a 2019 VW Atlas with a V6, and, my fun car a 2013 Miata convertible with a 6sp manual. I didn't expect the CRV to drive like those two especially the Miata which I can push past 120 mph if I want to feel like I want to go airborne. The CRV is fine as an everyday vehicle with a nice hybrid setup, acceptable gas mileage of around 32 to 35 mpg depending on whether I or my wife is driving. We looked at the RAV4 XSE Premium and were not impressed with the interior, handling, and, the front seats are horrible on your back and butt. After a 15 minute test drive in the RAV I felt I needed to immediately see my Chiropractor. Besides, neither of us liked the "boy toy" styling that looks like it was put together using Legos.
 

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Finally... Someone who really understands how the hybrid powertrain works in both the Accord (bought my son a 2020 Accord Hybrid) and the CRV. You are absolutely correct in stating that the ICE never powers the wheels. It sends the power needed directly to the two electric motors and any excess is sent to the battery. Your max 181 hp rating is correct and to get anywhere near the supposedly rated 212 hp you would theoretically have to exceed a speed of 100+ mph. This is my wife's vehicle and most of her driving is city/suburban with very few superhighway trips. In this type of driving this vehicle is much more fun to drive than the 1.5T. Also, Honda tuned the suspension a little tighter in the Hybrid than in the 1.5T Trim. We traded the wife's 2015 RAV4 Limited for this one. I hated that vehicle. Cramped, noisy at all speeds, and, the seat were horrible. Like I said, I hated that vehicle. I didn't buy this for it to be a speed demon. However, here in Texas we drive 75 to 85 on most of our highways (even the ones posted at 60 to 65) and I don't feel the CRV to be that noisy or underpowered. I've always have music playing at a reasonable volume so I'm not concentrating on road or engine noise. The only thing I have to get used to is the transmission because it doesn't "kick down" when you tromp it like a normal transmission. However, there isn't many times we are on two lane roads that force me to pass in a hurry. My main daily driver is a 2019 VW Atlas with a V6, and, my fun car a 2013 Miata convertible with a 6sp manual. I didn't expect the CRV to drive like those two especially the Miata which I can push past 120 mph if I want to feel like I want to go airborne. The CRV is fine as an everyday vehicle with a nice hybrid setup, acceptable gas mileage of around 32 to 35 mpg depending on whether I or my wife is driving. We looked at the RAV4 XSE Premium and were not impressed with the interior, handling, and, the front seats are horrible on your back and butt. After a 15 minute test drive in the RAV I felt I needed to immediately see my Chiropractor. Besides, neither of us liked the "boy toy" styling that looks like it was put together using Legos.
Isn't the ICE powering the vehicle when you see the gear icon on the cluster? I see it when cruising at 60-65 often. If not, what does that mean?
 

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Isn't the ICE powering the vehicle when you see the gear icon on the cluster? I see it when cruising at 60-65 often. If not, what does that mean?
Yes, the previous poster is wrong. There is a clutch that will allow the ICE to directly power the vehicle.

Here is a great video which explains how the engine powers the generator, electric motor, and when the clutch engages:

 

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You are absolutely correct in stating that the ICE never powers the wheels. It sends the power needed directly to the two electric motors and any excess is sent to the battery.
I think you missed part of what I said, but I may not have been as clear as I should. I said that the engine's peak ratings (129 lb-ft at 3500 rpm, 146 HP at 6200 rpm) will never apply in Engine Drive mode. Not that the engine never drives the wheels. It never sends power to both motor-generators at the same time, but it does send power to the wheels and the traction motor at the same time. Just not at its rated capacities. The motor adds or subtracts power as necessary.

The engine can be connected to either the 141 HP generator (clutch disengaged in Hybrid Drive mode) alone, or simultaneously to the wheels and the 181 HP motor-generator (clutch engaged in Engine Drive mode). Technically, it is still connected to the generator in Engine Drive, but the generator is disconnected from the battery so it just spins freely as a flywheel. Here's a cartoon of it from a Honda research document:
145924

While I called it a cartoon, it is actually a very accurate rendering of the mechanical parts. The "I-beam" figures are the gears that can be seen in the video that atari52oo posted.

Your max 181 hp rating is correct and to get anywhere near the supposedly rated 212 hp you would theoretically have to exceed a speed of 100+ mph.
These speeds apply to the Accord, but the CR-V should be close (it varies both the gear ratio and the tire diameter). In Engine Drive, the 129 lb-ft would be at 95 mph, and the 146 HP (necesary for 212 combined HP) would be at 167 mph. But you would never be in Engine Drive at those speeds, or with the pedal to the floor. In Hybrid drive, there is no relationship between speed and rpms.

But what a conventional car's (well, really the engine's) HP rating means is vastly misunderstood. It never means the power that can be applied to the road. It means the power that can be produced by the engine. Any components that it powers, but are unnecessary to its operation (power steering, A/C, alternator, etc.), reduce that power before it gets to the wheels. As do losses in the transmission. Then, it really only applies at one specific rpm; and if you are at full throttle, it is highly unlikely you will stay at that one rpm.

The point is that you shouldn't think of HP rating as what is available for driving. It is for comparing cars, and doesn't do well at that. A 191 HP Accord reaches 60 mph in 7.1 seconds, while a 203 HP Camry needs 7.9 seconds. The difference is the turbocharger. And SAE net HP is well-defined for those. This is not the case in the hybrids. The 212 HP rating is true to the spirit of this rating. The system in the hybrid Accord and CR-V can supply 212 HP, but even after running compressors, it can't send all of what is left to the motor. What isn't intuitively obvious, is that IT DOESN'T MATTER, since all of what the 181 HP motor can do is available at any speed. And BTW, that's the smaller of (5*MPH,181).
 

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Hi All

I’ve had the 2020 CRV hybrid ex-l for about 4 months and found the mpg to be very low. I never got above 28mpg in the city or on the highway. I then discovered that turning off “Econ” mode (the little green leaf symbol) was the issue. I turned this off and suddenly started averaging 35mpg+ in 30-50 degree F weather. Has anyone else noticed this behavior? It seems like a bug with the car but figured I’d ask to see if anyone else has noticed this. Thanks!
 

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Hi All

I’ve had the 2020 CRV hybrid ex-l for about 4 months and found the mpg to be very low. I never got above 28mpg in the city or on the highway. I then discovered that turning off “Econ” mode (the little green leaf symbol) was the issue. I turned this off and suddenly started averaging 35mpg+ in 30-50 degree F weather. Has anyone else noticed this behavior? It seems like a bug with the car but figured I’d ask to see if anyone else has noticed this. Thanks!
Hi and welcome.

The ECON button is not a bug per se.

It changes the dynamics of the car - and is better used at constant higher speeds like on a motorway/freeway for better efficiency.

In a urban setting, the ECON mode kinda throttles performance to chase fuel efficiency, but in doing so, it never actually makes any gains.

Always best to leave ECON off frankly :)
 

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hello all, i just purchased the CR-V Hybrid Touring model because i commute a long distance to work and wanted an SUV that could get me almost 500 mp tank full. i looked at the CR-V stats and the 14 gallon tank along with 38mpg highway was what i was looking for. i traded in my 2017 AWD Nissan Rogue SV that i really like. first tankful drive an I’m got 29mpg which is 2mpg better than the Rogue. this is unacceptable as the advertisement says 38mpg, i went higher on payment, its less comfortable and is slothy in traffic as the engine cannot keep up with traffic. when i try to use EV mode the battery is never charged and it disconnects after .10 of a mi.

am i doing something wrong or did i just get ripped off?
 

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Hybrids and EVs lose mileage in the colder weather. Once it warms up, your mpg will increase to advertised levels or higher.

Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
 

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hello all, i just purchased the CR-V Hybrid Touring model because i commute a long distance to work and wanted an SUV that could get me almost 500 mp tank full. i looked at the CR-V stats and the 14 gallon tank along with 38mpg highway was what i was looking for. i traded in my 2017 AWD Nissan Rogue SV that i really like. first tankful drive an I’m got 29mpg which is 2mpg better than the Rogue. this is unacceptable as the advertisement says 38mpg, i went higher on payment, its less comfortable and is slothy in traffic as the engine cannot keep up with traffic. when i try to use EV mode the battery is never charged and it disconnects after .10 of a mi.

am i doing something wrong or did i just get ripped off?
Mileage at highway speeds is going to be significantly worse in the Hybrid CRV than you get in around town driving. Also, not really meant to drive in pure EV mode, except across maybe a parking lot, as battery is very small. Looks like you should have done more research before purchase. All this is well known and documented.
 

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thanks and i hope so but its been in the 60’s and 70’s last two weeks when i drove it.
Interesting. Maybe as your engine breaks in, it'll get better. I've been getting around 26-29 all winter. It started to warm up a little and I'm getting 32-33 now. When I first got the car around September before it started to get cold, I was getting around 40 I believe.

Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
 

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well then - the advertisement if 38mpg on Highway is a complete lie and i got ripped off. im paying a tin more for 1 mpg better in a car that is unimpressive. guess ill eat the off the pot cost in this purchase.

buyer beware. sorry to be upset but this is the most ive spent on a vehicle and the first that isnt up to its primary task.
 

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thanks and i hope so but its been in the 60’s and 70’s last two weeks when i drove it.
The question would be, did you have your Climate Control system on, and was it calling for heat?
Sometimes people leave the heat on even when it's not required.
The two things I have found that really eat into my mileage are using the CC for heat, and climbing significant inclines (I mean thousands of feet, not little "hills").
Outside of those two things, I can easily get 44 MPH, as long as I don't drive like a maniac.
 
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