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Discussion Starter #1
I've notice that once they converted to winter gas (SouthEast MA), the gas mileage on our 2017 CR-V Touring dropped from 32-33 MPG to 29-30 MPG. I will look on Fuelly to investigate, but I probably can not sort by region.

Has anyone else seen this? TIA
 

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I guess I ask because it is a greater difference than I have seen on my other (prior) vehicles. This article says 2% difference, I see a 9% drop in gas mileage - seems much too high.
 

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It's normal; winter-blend gas has less energy per gallon so less miles per gallon. Also, colder air is heavier therefore it takes more power to push it out of the way. If you're running snow tires, they're softer and have more rolling resistance.
 

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Same here in Pa. Winter mileage drops due a lot to the gas but driving habits and the cold as well. In the spring it will start back up. You could have a Honda Passport and they are bad all the time....... jim
 

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Discussion Starter #6
  • No snow tires.
  • Temps had not dropped, yet.
  • Driving habit (weekly drive to Boston) did not change.
10% drop just seems too large, for as best as I can do a controlled experiment.
I'm being to suspect the adiabatic setting of the turbo-engine change.
 

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I think one more thing is time to get up to temperature, in the summer it less than a mile and in the winter about 5 miles or more. The so called fix did that .....
 

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10% is not really unusual. The winter blend is OXYGENATED. That's why it carries less energy per gallon than summer blend. Even if temperatures haven't dropped below the 50s, you're still burning fuel with less total energy and it's taking longer to get up to regular operating temperature as others have suggested. Also keep in mind that getting up to temperature under the hood doesn't do much to heat up the fuel in the tank at the rear of the vehicle. Only the pump can do that, so while that helps, the temperature of the fuel as it hits the injectors on a 50 degree day is probably not as high as on a 90 degree day.

If you want to run a test, go on a long highway trip on a Sunday morning (or in the middle of the night) when there's not much traffic and use cruise control. Make sure the tires are properly inflated before you start. If you haven't had a proper alignment done within the last 20,000 miles or if you've hit some large bumps and potholes in recent months, you should also consider this a potential source of excess fuel comsumption. Sometimes, the cumulative effect of hitting lots of small obstacles in the road and even going over speedbumps too fast can knock out the alignment slightly, maybe not enough to cause noticeable uneven tread wear, but enough to cause fuel economy to decrease by a few percentage points.
 

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I do notice in the winter I get way better mileage coming back than i do going. I would guess it is because it is because the engine is warm the whole way....
 

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I guess I ask because it is a greater difference than I have seen on my other (prior) vehicles. This article says 2% difference, I see a 9% drop in gas mileage - seems much too high.
The article misrepresents the estimated loss in mpg though.

Why? Because there are literally dozens of different fuel blends used across the country, and some have a modest impact on mpg, and others have more impact on mpg. Unless the article did a road test analysis with every fuel blend used in the US.. it simply cannot make accurate statements as to affect on mpg.

Honestly, your personal results with your CRV look to be more representative of the decline in mpg due to winter blends in general.
 

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I just went to around 7 miles and it is spitting snow and 34 degrees and it got less than 28 going in and almost 32 coming home.......engine was warm on the way back......
 

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I just went to around 7 miles and it is spitting snow and 34 degrees and it got less than 28 going in and almost 32 coming home.......engine was warm on the way back......
Makes sense. A cold engine is not as fuel efficient as a warm engine, particularly with how these engines tuning is dynamically controlled for conditions these days. And the engine will be running in a high idle state initally when first turned on and cold as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Also, colder air is heavier therefore it takes more power to push it out of the way.
10% is not really unusual. The winter blend is OXYGENATED.
Well, technically speaking as a ChemE trained Boomer, increased air density & oxygenation, should yield more combustion power per carbon atom. Each increases O2 per volume - perhaps too much for the allowable combustion configuration. Jet engines produce more thrust in winter than summer, one reason for longer runways in AZ. Something more complicated is going on, probably biased by engine electronic controls to keep drive-ability OK.
 

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I'm no chemist, but the way it was explained to me years ago is that the oxygen infused in the mixture replaces molecules that contain more energy than the oxygen replaces. But I don't really know. 🤷‍♂️

Makes sense. A cold engine is not as fuel efficient as a warm engine, particularly with how these engines tuning is dynamically controlled for conditions these days. And the engine will be running in a high idle state initally when first turned on and cold as well.
The fact that it was getting over 31mpg for any distance on any winter blend gasoline at any operating temperature is a good indication that all the systems are working properly.
 

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I work in a refinery making gasoline. The main reason that the mpg drops in the winter is that the winter blend contains about 10% BUTANE which has a lot less energy than the heavier gasoline molecules. This helps cold engines to start as well as being cheaper to make.
 

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I work in a refinery making gasoline. The main reason that the mpg drops in the winter is that the winter blend contains about 10% BUTANE which has a lot less energy than the heavier gasoline molecules. This helps cold engines to start as well as being cheaper to make.
Now that makes the most sense, of anything "being cheaper to make"......
 

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I work in a refinery making gasoline. The main reason that the mpg drops in the winter is that the winter blend contains about 10% BUTANE which has a lot less energy than the heavier gasoline molecules. This helps cold engines to start as well as being cheaper to make.
Which is why the consumers get the trickle down effect of 10% cheaper fuel...NOT.
Someone is pocketing some $ here.
 

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I am getting 500km in Toronto which is 310 miles to a tank..this is actual instead of the projected which the computer shows. My crv is a month old so i do not have any figures before this to compare summer vs winter. However in my opinion thats not that great. I had heard before getting the crv that it's amazing on gas...not so much actually.
 
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