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Hello, I have a 2018 1.5 HONDA CR-V EX I got in October 2018 and I’m getting the whole suite of “problems” from the Honda sensing gear (radar sensor is not blocked) as well as check engine light (solid, not blinking) and brake system light (solid yellow). I’ve made a service appointment tomorrow with the dealer I bought it from, but it’s only got 9,200 miles on it and I am baffled as to how this could happen. I just drove it’s first snow storm last weekend, picture attached shows the ice build up which melted and fell off eventually.Any thoughts from the forum?
 

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2016 CRV Touring AWD
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It's well known and reported here that the wet frozen snow over the sensors stop the system from working properly.
no manufacturer has yet figured out a solution afaik.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I’m more concerned about the emission “problem”. I’ve looked at other posts, and can’t understand how snow on the exterior of the car can throw things so much out of whack, even once the snow dried
 

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2019 Acura RDX Aspec
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Seems like you not only froze the sensor but maybe shutters and some other equipment. Usually dont get emissions/awd errors with ice build up.

go to the dealer

the full car shot seemed sub arctice, theres a diff between small ice coverage and solide sheets forming on a vehicle
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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My current working suggestion to help mitigate this is to spray a light coating of Teflon lock lubricant (which is a dry lubricant once the carrier solvent evaps).. and see if that inhibits ice sticking to the front cover of the radar array. DuPont even dual brands their teflon spray for both locks and for snow and ice (they charge more for the ice branded version :p ): https://www.amazon.com/DuPont-Teflon-Snow-Repellant-10-Ounce/dp/B0031T82NO/ref=sr_1_19?crid=33Z0AMWO8UO2J&dchild=1&keywords=teflon+lock+lubricant&qid=1575598340&sprefix=teflon+lock+,aps,202&sr=8-19

I don't live in ice and snow in winter.. so I can't test this personally.

Just make sure the cover is clean and dry first, and don't get too carried away with the spray... and plan on having to reapply it periodically too.. since I am sure ice and snow particles hitting it while driving may drive it off the surface.
 

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Hello, I have a 2018 1.5 HONDA CR-V EX I got in October 2018 and I’m getting the whole suite of “problems” from the Honda sensing gear (radar sensor is not blocked) as well as check engine light (solid, not blinking) and brake system light (solid yellow). I’ve made a service appointment tomorrow with the dealer I bought it from, but it’s only got 9,200 miles on it and I am baffled as to how this could happen. I just drove it’s first snow storm last weekend, picture attached shows the ice build up which melted and fell off eventually.Any thoughts from the forum?
Hello,

I believe you (@Schiffmad) are on the correct path with this possibly being emissions related.

These codependent systems will trigger the "Christmas Tree Effect" when the one system cannot receive (or send) vital data from (or too) other unit/s.

If the PCM (essentially the lord of all things emissions related) or another subsystem were to detect an issue, then set a DTC and then in turn stops sending out data, a cascading effect takes place where other unit/s set there own DTC's and stop sending data, then other units set DTC's and stop sending out data and so on.

The philosophy used by the individual system groups (yes many teams are sequestered for many reasons) is "when in doubt it's better to NOT broadcast possibly flawed data".

Possibly flawed data could potentially be used by another system that then could make an incorrect judgment with a detrimental consequence.

@Schiffmad please come back to us with ALL the DTC's found in all the subsystems so we can learn and understand.

Cheers!
 

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Too much ice is definitely the problem setting off all of your noted system alarms. I have a friend with a newer Mercedes Benz who was caught in a Minnesota snow storm last winter. Car completely shut down while on the interstate. She had to have it towed over 100 miles to her Minneapolis dealer for a defrost and system reset.
 

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During my recent 70-mile drive on the interstate, going at 75 mph with light drizzle in 40's degree weather, my CRV kept giving me the "radar obstructed" and deactivated my ACC several times. It drove me crazy b/c I didn't figure out out to turn off ACC and go back to the "stone-age" cruise mode. It would err for a while, then came back online which led me to reactivate the ACC only to find it to stop working a minute later!!! I was cursing Honda the whole way until I found the way to deactivate ACC and enable manual cruise. You my friend seem to have a Honda-made Christmas tree. :)
 

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How were you able to deactivate the ACC and run the cruise in ‘stone age’ mode? We have 17 & 19 Touring models. We see this on both vehicles in snow and heavy rain. The system self-resets in rain. Usually it takes several minutes after snow/slush is cleaned off the sensor cover before reset.
 

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How were you able to deactivate the ACC and run the cruise in ‘stone age’ mode? We have 17 & 19 Touring models. We see this on both vehicles in snow and heavy rain. The system self-resets in rain. Usually it takes several minutes after snow/slush is cleaned off the sensor cover before reset.
You deactivate the ACC mode by holding down the cruise-following-distance button for several seconds.
 

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How were you able to deactivate the ACC and run the cruise in ‘stone age’ mode? We have 17 & 19 Touring models. We see this on both vehicles in snow and heavy rain. The system self-resets in rain. Usually it takes several minutes after snow/slush is cleaned off the sensor cover before reset.
You shouldn't be using ACC or regular CC in snow and heavy rain.
 

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You shouldn't be using ACC or regular CC in snow and heavy rain.
Running ACC + being an attentive driver always feels safer in those situations. Especially if you set the speed to a reasonable speed. At least there is a backup system detecting vehicles and braking for you if needed. Human error always seems more likely.
 
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