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I would like to find a Jackson Racing Supercharger, any performance mods like a noce header, or turbo setup if the JRSC isn't available, Sway Bars, and TL-S calipers. Tuning software or anything to increase the performance. The only mods the CRV has no is H&R springs and 18" wheels.
 

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Yeah, you probably killed any and all acceleration fun with those 18" wheels. How much bigger in circumference are they vs the stock wheels/tires?
 

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I put 18s on mine and no loss in power. I have tires that are the correct size so the final diameter is almost identical to stock. Rim diameter means absolutely nothing. But bigger rims can mean far heavier if buying cheap junk. My crv actually gets better MPG now with the new wheels/tires because of weight lost.

But it's a CRV. Not a race car. And none of the tuning bits exist. Requires custom work with dual ecm systems etc. And that's provided the one you have is a manual transmission. Automatic transmission wont take the abuse. The engine isnt meant to be fast. It's designed for torque and efficiency since its 4wd. Better off building a civic if you want something that can be tuned and actually be fast.

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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Actually, rim diameter DOES make a difference in MPG.It comes down to mass (commonly mistaken for weight). Bigger metal at each corner takes extra HP to accelerate and brake.Tire Rack lists the WEIGHT of each wheel and being aware can allow a buyer to minimize the issue. That said, on my sports car, we can replace the OEM cast aluminum wheels with 2" bigger FORGED and pocketed aluminum rims, with tires that are the same overall diameter, and the mass is still 10% more.(The weight of new oversize wheels can be offset somewhat by the lightening effect in your wallet. LOL)
 

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It matters IF they weigh more. Its rotational mass (something we spend a lot of time on in cycling, rotational mass of wheel/tire combos are the most important aspect of a bicycle).

If circumference remains constant, upsizing alloy wheels (again of course depends on the wheels. Cheap heavy ones go the other way) actually reduces rotating. Alloy wheel/tire combos the tires are always the heaviest part until you go to lower profile. Even then decent alloy wheels are still lighter than the tires. That's part of why the trend towards larger alloys and lower profile tires, increased fuel economy. Along with of course style and much better handling.

Increasing circumference or increasing rotating mass will decrease MPG. Simply maintaining circumference but increasing rim diameter unless using crappy, heavy alloy wheels can and usually does increase mpg.

Now going WIDER can cause issues if going too much wider than OEM.

My alloy versus OEM steel combos my 18"set up is 3-4lbs lighter.

But blaming 18" rims for making a vehicle feel like it lost a bunch of power, nope not even close. Oversized tires along with cheap crap alloys ok, but the way he talks he didnt buy some nasty ghetto dirt cheap 18s that way 30lbs each.

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Can't jump to conclusions--the OP hasn't replied, so we don't know if it's a plus-sized 18" wheel, or if it's some fat 18" offroad wheels and tires which, of course, could weigh a lot more.

If you want a dog, try driving a '97 CR-V. That '02 will feel fast after that. ;)
 

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I know this is an old thread but it should be set straight: 90+% of all larger rims weigh more than the stock size. The tires have to be made larger and with more support from the sidewalls, giving the car a harsher ride. The acceleration drop going from the tiny stock 15s to 18s is massive. Unless you have carbon fiber wheels or something crazy expensive, it will weigh more than the factory alloys, not to mention bigger and heavier brakes to accommodate the change. It's simple science called inertia.
 

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Not only that, consider the change in effect drivetrain ratio between the outside diameter of the tires and the fixed ratio of the drivetrain. In the days of rear wheel drive cars, this would have the similar effect of changing the ratio in your rear end (differential/rear axle) by swapping in a new gear set. In essence, acceleration will improve if you use much smaller wheels, yet your engine will run faster and top speed will be limited. Determining that final drive ratio (which includes the tires being used) is a trade-off.

From having attempted some limited off-road driving, a CR-V simply isn't made for it. These have no power. I have run into situations a few times where there is an incline that a CR-V doesn't have the power to attempt on its own. One of these was on a switchback, so accelerating ahead of time to go up and around the turn would have been a potentially life-ending maneuver (such as, flying off the end of the switchback into a canyon); in other situations, the shock of going over the small but steep incline could cause other damage.

It's too bad nobody in the aftermarket ever designed a transfer case replacement that would give the CR-V proper 4L/4H ranges to make off-roading a possibility.

Increasing engine power output would offer limited returns as well. A good portion of it would have to overcome the added mass of larger wheels and tires, plus the drivetrain ratio change due to the increased tire diameter. Something else to overcome while driving on rougher off-road terrain is tire pressure, as you want to reduce your pressure to maybe 15 psi to absorb a lot of the road shocks (this is commonly done on proper 4x4 vehicles when off-roading, then the tires are refilled before returning to pavement). Then after overcoming all of those issues, you'd need additional power beyond that to start giving a "seat of the pants" difference in power. Too much power will stress the transmission and AWD system, so that is an added risk by adding more torque to the engine.

Having said that, a totally cool build might involve adapting a CR-V to use the drivetrain from a second gen RDX, which is a similar chassis size but uses the 3.5L V6 engine and the SH-AWD system.
 
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