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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I recently moved more north, and the roads are more treacherous during winter time. I've decide to take a look at the Honda CR-V. I do have some questions for current CR-V owners though, just to get a more impartial perspective on things, and it would be a great help if you could answer them. I thank you all in advance.

a) Do you feel that 4WD helps in poorer road conditions? I know the marketing team would like me to believe so, but I would like to know more from actual owners.

b) It's probably true that SUVs like the CR-V are more prone to rollovers ... that's just physics talking, and there isn't really much we can do about it. Do you feel that it was a deciding factor when you were thinking about purchasing your CR-V?

c) The dealership threw gas economy numbers at me, and they're slightly above a sedan like the Accord, which is understandable. If you have both a CR-V and a sedan, how does the gas economy compare in real world situations?

d) The CR-V's closest competitor cousin is Toyota's Rav4. I remember the Rav4 of old fondly, because of its relatively smaller size, which I personally like because of its manuvourability. (I was very disappointed with the new Accord ... it seems so big now. I'd rather not feel like a pregnant whale looking for a place to beach when I park). I guess two questions here: Did you consider the Rav4 when you were looking for your CR-V? and, do you feel that the CR-V's gotten bigger over the years?

Thank you all in advance for your time and patience. I hope that I'll be able to come back with good news that I am of your membership.
 

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Hi all,

I recently moved more north, and the roads are more treacherous during winter time. I've decide to take a look at the Honda CR-V. I do have some questions for current CR-V owners though, just to get a more impartial perspective on things, and it would be a great help if you could answer them. I thank you all in advance.

a) Do you feel that 4WD helps in poorer road conditions? I know the marketing team would like me to believe so, but I would like to know more from actual owners.

b) It's probably true that SUVs like the CR-V are more prone to rollovers ... that's just physics talking, and there isn't really much we can do about it. Do you feel that it was a deciding factor when you were thinking about purchasing your CR-V?

c) The dealership threw gas economy numbers at me, and they're slightly above a sedan like the Accord, which is understandable. If you have both a CR-V and a sedan, how does the gas economy compare in real world situations?

d) The CR-V's closest competitor cousin is Toyota's Rav4. I remember the Rav4 of old fondly, because of its relatively smaller size, which I personally like because of its manuvourability. (I was very disappointed with the new Accord ... it seems so big now. I'd rather not feel like a pregnant whale looking for a place to beach when I park). I guess two questions here: Did you consider the Rav4 when you were looking for your CR-V? and, do you feel that the CR-V's gotten bigger over the years?

Thank you all in advance for your time and patience. I hope that I'll be able to come back with good news that I am of your membership.



A) IF you go with the V, then go for the 4wd also. Yes it is worth it. I enjoyed it in the snow this past winter. It makes winter driving like normal.

B) Not a factor in my decision. I tend to drive defensively. I haven't rolled over since I was a young driver.

C) I drive a "07" V. My real gas mileage is 25 city and country driving. 28-30 on the highway.

D) I didn't consider the RAV but wished I had. Yes the "V" is larger now.

Note: Notice the stats on this forum. The most activity is in the "Problems and issues" category. I think I would find a similar forum on the RAV and see how it is accepted by real world people. I wouldn't listen to the dealers at all.
The "V" has lots of problems and issues. Are they more than any other new car? Not sure. The consumer has to compare.

Good Luck.
 

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Welcome To The Club & We Hope You Choose a CR-V

As the title suggests, I don't know how impartial our answers will be (this is a V club after all) but here goes:

A. The 4WD (especially if used with snow tires) will definitely handle winter roads better than 2WD. There are plenty of threads on this site singing praises to the ability of 4WD to handle winter conditions. I am impressed myself. It is not simply dealer sales pitch.

B. I believe you will find that while the CR-V is somewhat higher, it is not extremely high. I think it is better than some of the huge SUVs but probably not as good as a lower slung vehicle such as the Outback. If you drive reasonably, you will not have a problem. If you want it to handle like a Ferrari, well buy a Ferrari.

C. Mine gets better than the sticker would suggest. I get 22 to 24 in suburban (I do extremely little city driving and no rush hour) and 27 to 29 on the highway. I can get 30 if I try with no A/C on the highway. Winter mileages are not as good.

D. The RAV 4 if I remember correctly had a smaller turning radius, ergo it could be easier to park. What killed the RAV 4 for me was interior comfort, the tire on the door, and god awful looks (totally subjective-but it looks like a 58 Rambler which I thought was a ugly car in 1958 and my opinion hasn't changed). It was too plastic looking in the back. I believe it to be a good vehicle certainly equal to the CR-V and according to Consumer Reports superior.

Welcome to the club. Good luck with your choice. We hope you choose a V, but then again we probably are not very impartial!

BTW about a year ago, we had a guy post about all the advantages of a Jeep over a CR-V. The overwhelming advice was to buy the Jeep, but don't expect us to sell our V's so we can be impartial to a degree!



 

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A. 4WD versus 2WD. Yes, the 4WD makes a difference. Even with pretty poor OEM tires, my 4WD CR-V did much better than my Mom's Front-WD Accord with great Michelin tires. Personally, I don't feel a need for specialized winter tires. Quality, all-season tires have always worked for us in Colorado--yes even with significant time driving in winter conditions in the mountains.

B. Rollover Potential. I'd rather roll my CR-V than my Miata. Of course, I'm a whole lot less likely to roll the Miata, but I'm not concerned with rolling the CR-V from an engineering standpoint or from a safety standpoint if it ever happens. There is a bunch of rollover structure and what?, 7 airbags coming from every direction? I did some pretty stupid stuff in my teenage years in a Jeep CJ-7 and never managed to roll the thing! I think the whole rollover thing was/is the modern day version of Nader's campaign against Corvairs!

C. Gas Mileage. I get right around 25 mpg on average in mixed driving. Still haven't done any pure interstate cruising for a whole tank, but I don't do the NY city stop and go in rush hour, either. Without looking at my mileage log, about the best I've done is around 30-31 and the worst was probably around 21 mpg.

D. RAV-4 Comparison. I wasn't all that thrilled about the interior styling on the Toyota to start with. Thinking that I could get used to it and it might eventually "grow" on me, I decided to take a look anyway. The salesman was a *complete* ass so I walked away and never gave it a second thought. I have many friends and some family who are very happy with Toyota so I guess it would be worth a look.

As for those who say the CR-V is full of problems. Bunk! Keep in mind that people who are happy generally say nothing and just quietly enjoy their cars. People who are unhappy want to tell the world. I find the balance on this forum between happy and disappointed to be weighted more towards the positive side. This speaks volumes as far as I'm concerned.

The only thing I am slightly disappointed with is the need to change the rear differential fluid more often than what is normal with non-CRV vehicles. I think this speaks to a design flaw and I am disappointed that Honda has produced and sold a car with a design flaw. This being said, I am less concerned now because I performed my first rear diff fluid change a few weeks ago and now realize it's no big deal. I'd estimate $15 in materials and about 20 minutes worth of time if you're not in a hurry. An extra $15 and 20 minutes spent every other oil change isn't going to make me lose sleep at night.

Hope this helps...

Rod
08 EX-L w/Navi
22,500 miles
 

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I remember the time when I was on the market choosing
between RAV4 and CRV. Like you I had the same predicament and studied both vehicles taking into
considerations every bit of the differences.

I opted with the CRV and I'm happy with my choice.

No regrets........:)
 

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It was a no brainer. CRV with it's lift gate and 5-speed auto vs the RAV (4 cyl.) with it's swing-out rear door and 4-speed auto.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for your replies! They were quite informative!

I have a few more questions though, if it's okay.

a) How do you find the highway driving? Do you find yourself being moved by the wind on the highway? I suppose this is a possibility because the car is slightly taller? The salesperson is trying to persuade me that it's offset by Honda's amazing aerodynamic abilities. But I'm not sure how much I can believe her on that one

b) How do you find the maintenance costs? Are you still with the dealership, or a 3rd party mechanic?

I'm going to test drive the Nissan Rogue hopefully today or tomorrow, and the CR-V as well. On paper, the CR-V looks like the better deal :)
 

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A. Highway Driving. It doesn't track like an S-class Mercedes, but there's also not a huge difference between my 08 CRV and my Mom's 04 V-6 Accord. You feel gusty winds, but it's not a big fight to keep it between the lines. It's a little nosier than I'd like at highway speeds. This various considerably with the type of road surface. Grooved concrete is very loud. New asphalt is very quiet. I'm also told that switching to virtually any tire other than the OEM Bridgestones will quiet the ride considerably. I drive approximately 1500 miles per month with probably at least 1200 of that spent on the highway. I have no regrets in this regard.

B. Maintenance Costs. I've done all the work myself so far. I like the Maintenance Minder concept because I feel it gives me "credit" for easy highway miles and I'm not inconvenienced by arbitrary 3000 or 5000 mile oil changes. I've probably spent a grand total of $150 in materials so far for the first 2 Maintenance Minder services. In addition to what's in the manual, I replaced the air filter both times and the cabin filter on the second service. I also replaced all 3 wiper blades with Honda OEM rubber. Included in the cost is 10 quarts (2-5 gal. jugs) of Mobil 1 full synthetic oil. I'm very pleased with the reliability and lack of maintenance required. This was probably my primary reason for buying a Honda.

From a philosophical standpoint, my Honda CR-V is sort of my anti-mid-life-crisis vehicle. I reluctantly decided it was time for me to own a practical, relieable car. It's not flashy or fast or semi-rare/exotic. There is no snob appeal of a star or blue/white/black propeller logo on the hood. It's just a good, solid, reliable means of transportation that gets the job done.

Good luck with your decision.

Rod
 

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Hi all,

I recently moved more north, and the roads are more treacherous during winter time. I've decide to take a look at the Honda CR-V. I do have some questions for current CR-V owners though, just to get a more impartial perspective on things, and it would be a great help if you could answer them. I thank you all in advance.

a) Do you feel that 4WD helps in poorer road conditions? I know the marketing team would like me to believe so, but I would like to know more from actual owners.

b) It's probably true that SUVs like the CR-V are more prone to rollovers ... that's just physics talking, and there isn't really much we can do about it. Do you feel that it was a deciding factor when you were thinking about purchasing your CR-V?

c) The dealership threw gas economy numbers at me, and they're slightly above a sedan like the Accord, which is understandable. If you have both a CR-V and a sedan, how does the gas economy compare in real world situations?

d) The CR-V's closest competitor cousin is Toyota's Rav4. I remember the Rav4 of old fondly, because of its relatively smaller size, which I personally like because of its manuvourability. (I was very disappointed with the new Accord ... it seems so big now. I'd rather not feel like a pregnant whale looking for a place to beach when I park). I guess two questions here: Did you consider the Rav4 when you were looking for your CR-V? and, do you feel that the CR-V's gotten bigger over the years?

Thank you all in advance for your time and patience. I hope that I'll be able to come back with good news that I am of your membership.
a) 4wd does help in poor road conditions (snow, ice, sand, etc.). it all depends on the area where u live. i have a 2wd only because my area don't really get that much snow for me to warrant the buying for a 4wd.

b) the gen 3 crv actually handles quite well coz it's wider than previous models. when driving an suv, you dont take corners like you were driving a bmw. if you want to take corners fast and not worry about rolling over, then the crv is not the right vehicle for you.

c) during summer time, according to the gauge on my dash - i get around 10.4 to 10.8/litres per 100kms. winter time, it averages around 11.4

d) yes, i looked at the rav4 when i was shopping. only reason i went with crv is because at the time, rav4 dont have 2wd models and now they do. if i had to do everything over again and rav4 have 2wd models - i would go with rav4.
 

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I've got a (used) 2nd gen, so I can't speak to the third. I have always driven a car rather than an SUV previously, so I'll be honest - I got an SUV only because Honda doesn't make an AWD car at a reasonable price (there are a few Acura sedans with it). And I do feel like there are some sacrifices. It's not hugely fun to drive, it's a bit loud, and I do worry about rollover potential in emergency situations (I consider myself a very conservative driver, but that doesn't help much at all if you have debris on the highway ahead of you.) And it wobbles a bit when you turn, given the higher center of gravity, and of course the mileage isn't as good as, say, an Accord.

That said, and the reason I bought it, I think all the negatives would be worse in any of the competitors in the small-SUV class (such as the Toyota). I will admit to be pleasantly surprised when I drove it - it drives like a Honda Civic, only with you sitting on a couple of phone books on the seat. (I mean, the chassis IS basically a Civic, the same 103.1" wheelbase). So, I'm not 100% satisfied, but I really needed a car that could get through some tough weather (I'm about to move from MA, where winter is mostly just wet, to NH, where winter is mostly snow & ice).

I think in terms of reliability the car is likely to be unsurpassed. 3rd gen seems, anecdotally, to be a bit less reliable than previous models, but that is just my own surmising and may not be borne out by reliability statistics.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Hi everyone,

Thank you all for your answers. I think I've managed to trim my list down to the last three contenders: Honda CR-V, Nissan Rogue, Subaru Forester.

I test drove the Honda CR-V today, and everything was perfect. From the steering, the seats, the general feel of the car ... everything was great, except one thing. Under the advice of my friend who was used to driving SUVs, I tried to accelerate as fast as I could from a complete stop.

Nothing happened.

Well okay, not "nothing happened", but I accelerated at a similar speed as if I were driving normally. Now obviously, 2.4L engine, how fast can you go? But I was actually a bit scared that the response I got was not the one I was expecting. What if I was crossing an intersection, and a truck that couldn't stop is coming through, and I just need to get out of its way? Would it be able to give me the slight increase that I'll need to get out of the way? Especially in winter? I'm wondering though, whether that's just the demo car that I was driving. In comparison, the Nissan Rogue I test drove afterwards gave me a satisfying "HUMMM" when I stepped on it a bit harder, and yet it wasn't jerky. Now, the Honda CR-V is rated at 166hp, while the Nissan Rogue is a 2.5L, 170hp ... but those four horses and 0.1L .... did it really make THAT much of a difference?

My conclusion after the test drive of CR-V and Nissan Rogue: if they put the engine for the Rogue into the CR-V, (and the price too :rolleyes:) it would be a done deal.

Questions:

a) Do you find that your CR-V acceleration from complete stop is fast enough for emergencies? I'm keeping in mind that it's only a 4 cylinder engine and I'm not expecting any crazy race car acceleration, but it really was a surprise.

b) When parked, I noticed this: the gear shift in "P" completely blocks the lower panel buttons! The buttons in question are the: Max A/C, A/C, defogger? and the last one, which is really awkward, was the heated side mirror button. Do you feel that it's in the way?
 

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A. Acceleration/Power. I think this is all what you get used to. My previous daily driver car was significantly faster/more powerful than my CR-V. There were several instances when I first purchased my CR-V when I embarrassed myself thinking I could pull out in traffic and get out of someone's way. It didn't take long before my mind recalibrated to allow for my CR-V's performance envelope and I no longer piss people off in traffic! It's true that there are certainly quicker cars off the line and this hole-shot ability could save your bacon someday, but it's not something I'm overly concerned about. My little brother and his wife got broadsided in their very fast car about a decade ago. If he had seen it coming I guess there was a chance he could have romped on the gas and minimized the damage. I guess what I'm trying to say is even having a really fast car is no guarantee.

B. Shifter Location. This is one of those things that has grown on me over the last 22,500+ miles. I don't really care for the shifter location for the reasons you suggest along with general aesthetics. This being said, I no longer mind it and, honestly, I haven't noticed it presenting switch access problems like I thought it would.

You're asking some really great questions. I think you're going to wind up buying a vehicle that's really right for you.

Best regards,

Rod
 

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Hi everyone,

Thank you all for your answers. I think I've managed to trim my list down to the last three contenders: Honda CR-V, Nissan Rogue, Subaru Forester.

I test drove the Honda CR-V today, and everything was perfect. From the steering, the seats, the general feel of the car ... everything was great, except one thing. Under the advice of my friend who was used to driving SUVs, I tried to accelerate as fast as I could from a complete stop.

Nothing happened.

Well okay, not "nothing happened", but I accelerated at a similar speed as if I were driving normally. Now obviously, 2.4L engine, how fast can you go? But I was actually a bit scared that the response I got was not the one I was expecting. What if I was crossing an intersection, and a truck that couldn't stop is coming through, and I just need to get out of its way? Would it be able to give me the slight increase that I'll need to get out of the way? Especially in winter? I'm wondering though, whether that's just the demo car that I was driving. In comparison, the Nissan Rogue I test drove afterwards gave me a satisfying "HUMMM" when I stepped on it a bit harder, and yet it wasn't jerky. Now, the Honda CR-V is rated at 166hp, while the Nissan Rogue is a 2.5L, 170hp ... but those four horses and 0.1L .... did it really make THAT much of a difference?

My conclusion after the test drive of CR-V and Nissan Rogue: if they put the engine for the Rogue into the CR-V, (and the price too :rolleyes:) it would be a done deal.

Questions:

a) Do you find that your CR-V acceleration from complete stop is fast enough for emergencies? I'm keeping in mind that it's only a 4 cylinder engine and I'm not expecting any crazy race car acceleration, but it really was a surprise.

b) When parked, I noticed this: the gear shift in "P" completely blocks the lower panel buttons! The buttons in question are the: Max A/C, A/C, defogger? and the last one, which is really awkward, was the heated side mirror button. Do you feel that it's in the way?
a) it does feel kinda slow for me sometimes, especially when the car is loaded up with 5 people. but then again, you cant really expect much from a 4cyl with 160+ horses. i've been driving the car for almost 2 yrs now and for daily driving - the power in the crv is good enough. sure there were times i wish i have the rav4 V6, but for the most part - the 4cyl is enough.
if you want some really nice power, get the rav4 V6 with over 270 horses - it'll put many small suv's and even sporty cars out there to shame.

b) yes, the shifter does block the a/c buttons but it's not a big deal or shouldnt be a big deal unless the driver have no fingers.
 

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CR-V vs Forester

My wife and I just purchased a 2005 CR-V. We used to have a 2005 Forester, until it was totaled three weeks ago. We loved it. The Forester handled better, and definitely had more acceleration. However, the CR-V is much roomier, and more comfortable. It also has more cargo space. I think it has plenty of power myself. And I think it handles quite well, overall. It certainly corners better than I expected. We loved our Forester, But I think we will love the CR-V even more. Either way, you won't be dissapointed. They are both great vehicles. I have no experience with the Nissan. Historically, they do not seem to hold up as well as Toyota, Honda, or Subaru. As another poster said, I think you are on the road to the right vehicle for you. You are doing all the correct homework, and you have narrowed it down to some pretty good choices.
 

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Hi all,

I recently moved more north, and the roads are more treacherous during winter time. I've decide to take a look at the Honda CR-V. I do have some questions for current CR-V owners though, just to get a more impartial perspective on things, and it would be a great help if you could answer them. I thank you all in advance.

a) Do you feel that 4WD helps in poorer road conditions? I know the marketing team would like me to believe so, but I would like to know more from actual owners.

b) It's probably true that SUVs like the CR-V are more prone to rollovers ... that's just physics talking, and there isn't really much we can do about it. Do you feel that it was a deciding factor when you were thinking about purchasing your CR-V?

c) The dealership threw gas economy numbers at me, and they're slightly above a sedan like the Accord, which is understandable. If you have both a CR-V and a sedan, how does the gas economy compare in real world situations?

d) The CR-V's closest competitor cousin is Toyota's Rav4. I remember the Rav4 of old fondly, because of its relatively smaller size, which I personally like because of its manuvourability. (I was very disappointed with the new Accord ... it seems so big now. I'd rather not feel like a pregnant whale looking for a place to beach when I park). I guess two questions here: Did you consider the Rav4 when you were looking for your CR-V? and, do you feel that the CR-V's gotten bigger over the years?

Thank you all in advance for your time and patience. I hope that I'll be able to come back with good news that I am of your membership.

A) Yes, it definitely helps and I think it would be foolish to buy a 2WD CR-V in a climate where there is snow.

B) The CR-V earned a four star rating for rollovers. It is less prone to roll than some cars. I wasn't concerned about it in the least.

C) The CR-V more than likely will not get as good of mileage compared to an I4 Accord.

D) I didn't like the RAV4 at all when I bought my CR-V, and I still don't like it. I had a V6 RAV4 about two months ago as a rental and HATED everything other than the engine. The fit and finish was appauling for a Toyota product and the plastics were cheap. It certainly isn't as nice as a CR-V.

No, it hasn't grown much at all compared to the Accord. The CR-V has only gotten about 4 inches longer since it was released in America which is NOTHING.

Hi everyone,

Thank you all for your answers. I think I've managed to trim my list down to the last three contenders: Honda CR-V, Nissan Rogue, Subaru Forester.

I test drove the Honda CR-V today, and everything was perfect. From the steering, the seats, the general feel of the car ... everything was great, except one thing. Under the advice of my friend who was used to driving SUVs, I tried to accelerate as fast as I could from a complete stop.

Nothing happened.

Well okay, not "nothing happened", but I accelerated at a similar speed as if I were driving normally. Now obviously, 2.4L engine, how fast can you go? But I was actually a bit scared that the response I got was not the one I was expecting. What if I was crossing an intersection, and a truck that couldn't stop is coming through, and I just need to get out of its way? Would it be able to give me the slight increase that I'll need to get out of the way? Especially in winter? I'm wondering though, whether that's just the demo car that I was driving. In comparison, the Nissan Rogue I test drove afterwards gave me a satisfying "HUMMM" when I stepped on it a bit harder, and yet it wasn't jerky. Now, the Honda CR-V is rated at 166hp, while the Nissan Rogue is a 2.5L, 170hp ... but those four horses and 0.1L .... did it really make THAT much of a difference?

My conclusion after the test drive of CR-V and Nissan Rogue: if they put the engine for the Rogue into the CR-V, (and the price too :rolleyes:) it would be a done deal.

Questions:

a) Do you find that your CR-V acceleration from complete stop is fast enough for emergencies? I'm keeping in mind that it's only a 4 cylinder engine and I'm not expecting any crazy race car acceleration, but it really was a surprise.

b) When parked, I noticed this: the gear shift in "P" completely blocks the lower panel buttons! The buttons in question are the: Max A/C, A/C, defogger? and the last one, which is really awkward, was the heated side mirror button. Do you feel that it's in the way?

A) The acceleration is sufficient. It is not a rocket by any means but it is by NO means a deal breaker for me. The Rogue is an awful vehicle IMHO. There is nothing good about it and that CVT transmission is terrible. I don't think it does the vehicle any favors.

Compare Nissan to Honda in Consumer Reports and there is no contest. Nissans are not as reliable as Hondas, no matter what ANYONE says. They also do not hold their value nearly as well. That CVT if it fails will cost you over $6,000 to replace, and it still isn't a proven technology.

Try another CR-V and see if it is any different.
 
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