Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Recently we returned home from a two month trip and discovered the battery in our Florida garaged 2018 CRV Touring (13k miles) dead. It may have interacted with our home wifi and certainly the new electronics require a better/bigger battery. Local Honda mechanic suggested a trickle charger (less than $20) that can be set and left on w/o fear of overcharging. Bought one online for next trip. All my gps memory was wiped out.
Hope this helps
Flynnwalter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,366 Posts
There is a difference between trickle chargers and battery maintainers. The trickle chargers will trickle to the battery continuously, which is not good for the battery. These are typically very cheap, often under $10 (I had to buy a cheap one at Harbor Freight a few years ago for an old project of mine, and it was only $5.99). A maintainer, on the other hand, will cycle on and off as the charge level in the battery changes, so the battery is never overcharged. They can be purchased for around $20, and go up from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
wildcat is right do not use a trickle charger
The only trouble with these modern cars is that the car computer need to shut down completly and they will not with a charger attached
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Get an intelligent charger a la CTEK and be done with it. I have permanently installed plugs for it in my vehicles that need charging so I rotate the charger as needed. Plugging in needs a few seconds and the batteries are always in tip-top shape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Wildcat et al: Thanks! My mistake to use the word 'trickle' charger. I bought an ECO Motopower automatic battery charger/maintainer "Junior". I will not be turning off the wifi at our house, but will disable it on our CRV. (if I remember)
Flynnwalter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,329 Posts
Recently we returned home from a two month trip and discovered the battery in our Florida garaged 2018 CRV Touring (13k miles) dead. It may have interacted with our home wifi and certainly the new electronics require a better/bigger battery. Local Honda mechanic suggested a trickle charger (less than $20) that can be set and left on w/o fear of overcharging. Bought one online for next trip. All my gps memory was wiped out.
Hope this helps
Flynnwalter
A new (less than a year old) fully charged, to saturation (which honestly is rare in modern Hondas, due to the dual charging nature of the charging system) will give you at most 35 days before the battery is drained due to normal parasitic current levels in a gen5 CRV (which is 35-50ma). And I doubt it has enough remaining charge to start the vehicle after 30 days. This is with a 51R battery installed. Even with a bigger H5, Group 24, or similar battery installed.. it will only give you another week.. so figure 45 days maxiumum. But you never want to let a flooded cell battery fully discharge.

Personally, If I will be not using my vehicle for a week or longer, I put an electronic battery charger/maintainer on it so I never have to worry about it. A single full discharge can cut a year or more off the life expectancy of a vehicle starter battery. I do not trust even a battery that tests good under a load test to be at full reserve capacity if it is more than a year old.. so I simply do not take any chances.. because I loathe getting into my vehicle and finding a dead battery.

Heh.. and since we are in a county ordered shelter in place order where I live due to the coronavirus right now... I have purchased a second charger/maintainer now and keep one on each of our two vehicles. Turns out NOCO just released a new updates series of their Genius line of products.. so the new charger (Genius-5) is an upgrade to my old Genius 3500, and for the same price. (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Low amperage chargers cannot charge a depleted battery. Get as powerful one you can afford.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,329 Posts
Low amperage chargers cannot charge a depleted battery. Get as powerful one you can afford.
Better yet, always maintain and keep an eye on your battery, and never let it get depleted to begin with. Full depletion generally damages the battery and shortens it's life.

That said.

The NOCO Genius 5 which I just purchased, has a mode to recharge a battery from 0vdc. It also has a repair mode, but you have to disconnect the battery from the vehicle due to the higher charge voltage as it works to de-sulfate the plates. I intend to never have to try either charge mode though. :) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07W8KJH44/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Recently we returned home from a two month trip and discovered the battery in our Florida garaged 2018 CRV Touring (13k miles) dead. It may have interacted with our home wifi and certainly the new electronics require a better/bigger battery. Local Honda mechanic suggested a trickle charger (less than $20) that can be set and left on w/o fear of overcharging. Bought one online for next trip. All my gps memory was wiped out.
Hope this helps
Flynnwalter
I bought my 2012 Honda CRV brand new. The first six years it had five batteries. I finally read a thread on this website where a guy said he replaced his AC relay. I insisted on my mechanic pulling in replacing it with a brand new one 2 1/2 years ago and I’ve not had a dead battery or had to be jumpstarted or any battery issue sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,462 Posts
I bought my 2012 Honda CRV brand new. The first six years it had five batteries. I finally read a thread on this website where a guy said he replaced his AC relay. I insisted on my mechanic pulling in replacing it with a brand new one 2 1/2 years ago and I’ve not had a dead battery or had to be jumpstarted or any battery issue sense.
Seems like I have read this somewhere else today on this forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
A new (less than a year old) fully charged, to saturation (which honestly is rare in modern Hondas, due to the dual charging nature of the charging system) will give you at most 35 days before the battery is drained due to normal parasitic current levels in a gen5 CRV (which is 35-50ma).
I have to think the intelligent entry system is primarily to blame. On my 2013 Rogue, there was a rubber button on the front door handles. When I'd push the button, the vehicle sensor would look for the key. Then the key would send a signal back, unlocking the door. Then I'd pull the handle to actually open the door. It was very easy to do in one quick motion, although poor design and materials on that particular vehicle (first generation Rogue) will eventually cause the handle to crack since opening the door in a single motion puts a small bit of excess stress on the handle. That stress adds up over time.

On the 2019 Rav4 and 2019 CR-V with similar systems, my understanding is the vehicle is constantly looking for the key and the key is constantly sending out a signal telling the car it (the key) is in proximity. This drains both the vehicle battery and the fob battery. All for the convenience of merely pulling the handle rather than first pushing a button and then pulling the handle.

Without a proximity key, should I expect my vehicle battery to last longer than 30 days without the vehicle being started? Typically I try to limit short trips of less than 18-20 miles, so that may help too. I know the keyless entry buttons on my key only use juice from the fob battery when I'm actually hitting one of the buttons.

Maybe the more pertinent question is what is the vehicle doing while parked that drains the battery other than searching for the key fob?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
561 Posts
One thing some brands do, is run an emissions test in the middle of the night depending on temperature. Basically pulls a vacuum on your gas tank, monitors vacuum and temperature, and calculates if your tank and charcoal system is working right. Not sure if Honda does this too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,329 Posts
One thing some brands do, is run an emissions test in the middle of the night depending on temperature. Basically pulls a vacuum on your gas tank, monitors vacuum and temperature, and calculates if your tank and charcoal system is working right. Not sure if Honda does this too.
I have a battery monitor that links via bluetooth to an app on my phone. It gives me real time one minute interval readouts for a period of 30 days between app readouts.

In reviewing the data logs over a period of months now.. I can see when the emissions self test initiates. It does draw notable power (it pulls down the battery voltage about 0.1-0.2 vdc.. and runs for about 15 minutes). It does not do it every day though. It has some sort of algorithm it uses to decide when it needs to run a cycle and what limited information Honda has provided is that it will run from 5-15 hours after the vehicle is shut down, and only if the fuel tank is below a certain capacity reading. Temperature is a factor I'm sure as well. I guess.. as the tank empties, there is more room for vapor, depending on ambient temperature.

It may be that it actually does a soft-test daily for vapor load ... and only powers up the purge cycle (which is where all the power drain is) when the soft-test detects a need to purge the fuel tank. The design remains somewhat of a mystery, but it appears to be pretty smart about what it does and when.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,329 Posts
I have to think the intelligent entry system is primarily to blame. On my 2013 Rogue, there was a rubber button on the front door handles. When I'd push the button, the vehicle sensor would look for the key. Then the key would send a signal back, unlocking the door. Then I'd pull the handle to actually open the door. It was very easy to do in one quick motion, although poor design and materials on that particular vehicle (first generation Rogue) will eventually cause the handle to crack since opening the door in a single motion puts a small bit of excess stress on the handle. That stress adds up over time.

On the 2019 Rav4 and 2019 CR-V with similar systems, my understanding is the vehicle is constantly looking for the key and the key is constantly sending out a signal telling the car it (the key) is in proximity. This drains both the vehicle battery and the fob battery. All for the convenience of merely pulling the handle rather than first pushing a button and then pulling the handle.

Without a proximity key, should I expect my vehicle battery to last longer than 30 days without the vehicle being started? Typically I try to limit short trips of less than 18-20 miles, so that may help too. I know the keyless entry buttons on my key only use juice from the fob battery when I'm actually hitting one of the buttons.

Maybe the more pertinent question is what is the vehicle doing while parked that drains the battery other than searching for the key fob?
Sitting passive.. with no interactions from the owner in any way, including activating the keyfob... the passive parasitic is ~ 35ma. That represents the full standby power demand to keep all the electronic systems in standby.

The vehicle does listen for any sort of action by the keyfob... but that is an extremely low power operation, until it senses an active signal from the fob (which requires the owner to push one of the fobs buttons).

A keyfob action on the gen5 CRV (probably all Hondas) will initiate a wakeup cycle of the vehicle. Same with opening the drivers side door. Any other door opened, only activates the internal cabin lights. When the keyfob is activated by the driver, the battery voltage will drop ~ .2 to .4 vdc.. depending on how charged the battery is at the moment, ambient temperature, and other factors that affect a chemical battery under load. Best guess.. this represents a loading of 2-4 amps during wake up. If no additional activity is detected by the vehicle.. it will return to full standby power down mode within 3 minutes. You can actually see this on a voltage readout on the battery.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top