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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Back in November when putting on the winter tires and taking off the original tires (bridgeston ecopia), I noticed some gashes on the tire. Took it to the Honda dealer and they replaced the gashed tire with a brand new tire. The tire with the gashes was at 7/32mm. I asked the guy if I need to replace at least 2 tires or all 4. He said no because the tread depth of the ecopia is still new enough that it shouldn't affect it and some technical stuff he talked about thats apart of the CRV suspension - if the tread depth was 6/32mm then, yes to have at least 2 new tires.

So now that winter is done, I am putting the ecopia tires back on. Made an appt at Honda to put them on, but it was going to be a 5hr wait for them to swap my tires over (brutal, winter tires have their own dedicated rims), so I took them to Costco instead. Costco recommended that I get at least another of the same tire with more tread depth, they said it was safe to drive, but because of the tread depth of the new tire (11/32mm) versus the old tires (7/32mm), they recommended that I get at least a 2nd new tire to match or over the long term, it will damage the suspension.

Thoughts?

With COVID-19, I am out of a job and trying to minimize my expenses, so a bit out of affordability to spend $200CAD on a new tire.
 

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AWD or FWD CRV? If FWD... I see no issue. If AWD... a bit more care when replacing only one tire is in order.

What is most important when replacing a tire early due to some damage ---> same exact brand and model tire... so that tread traction and drive characteristics match... even for only FWD. But it is critically important for AWD to insure that the AWD systems operate properly and are not constantly fighting mismatched traction on the tires on one axle and trying to compensate with AWD.

Different shops will have different policies and recommendations on how much tread wear you can have on the remaining tire when placing a new matching tire on the other end of the axle. Generally if you have at least 50% tread left on the remaining tire, it's not an issue to replace only the damaged tire. If the Honda Dealer was OK with only replacing one tire, with the treadwear you indicated... then you are good to go in my view.. since they tend to be conservative. You could always go to Discount/Americas tire if you have one near by and get a second opinion before opting to buy an additional new tire.
 

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Most of the driving forces are through the front wheels. So I would put the matching tires on the front wheels.
 
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1 tire can always be replaced and to the front drive Ax. when a new one is placed it does not go to the rear, to the front. I said my peace. AWD or not throw it off by placing to the rear. you won;t feel it but the car will tell you down the road.
 

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Back in November when putting on the winter tires and taking off the original tires (bridgeston ecopia), I noticed some gashes on the tire. Took it to the Honda dealer and they replaced the gashed tire with a brand new tire. The tire with the gashes was at 7/32mm. I asked the guy if I need to replace at least 2 tires or all 4. He said no because the tread depth of the ecopia is still new enough that it shouldn't affect it and some technical stuff he talked about thats apart of the CRV suspension - if the tread depth was 6/32mm then, yes to have at least 2 new tires.

So now that winter is done, I am putting the ecopia tires back on. Made an appt at Honda to put them on, but it was going to be a 5hr wait for them to swap my tires over (brutal, winter tires have their own dedicated rims), so I took them to Costco instead. Costco recommended that I get at least another of the same tire with more tread depth, they said it was safe to drive, but because of the tread depth of the new tire (11/32mm) versus the old tires (7/32mm), they recommended that I get at least a 2nd new tire to match or over the long term, it will damage the suspension.

Thoughts?

With COVID-19, I am out of a job and trying to minimize my expenses, so a bit out of affordability to spend $200CAD on a new tire.
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No way should you buy a new tire, even if you had a job.

Do this . It’s quicker than it seems. :
1) Air all 4 tires to the exact same PSI

2) Use a thin flexible tape measure, or if you don’t have a such, use a string to measure the circumference around the center area of each tire. Tire carcasses sizes vary, making tread depth decisions a comprise, at best.
Use this circumference measurement.
Record the #s

3) Put the 2 largest tires to the front, the 2 smallest, to the rear.

4)On each end of the car, you can now add 1 psi air for each 1/4” the smaller tire was, or vice versa, to equalize the tire OD’s. This step is optional.

5) Enjoy
 

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These cars have independent suspensions. There will be no discernable difference in how it feels or operates. This thinking is of the antiquated variety from the old days when vehicles had rigid axles.
 

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These cars have independent suspensions. There will be no discernable difference in how it feels or operates. This thinking is of the antiquated variety from the old days when vehicles had rigid axles.
It has nothing to do with that.

But until the OP returns with details about the exact vehicle there isn't a complete or correct answer.
 

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Too much tire difference wont damage suspension, it is however very hard on the differential in the transmission if difference is too much. Not sure where anyone is coming up with anything suspension based. It's not coming to damage anything there.

Next a front wheel drive only just put the mismatch in the back and done. Dont even worry about it. Is it "best" to have 2 new tires, yes. Is it needed right now, hell no.

If yours is a 4wd or awd (I missed what year and your never said if it was fwd or 4wd/awd) that changes things.

True all wheel drive, you have 5% variation the drivetrain can handle, anything more you will damage things.

The old 4wd versions (realtime 4wd) must match tires per axle. Smallest/most worn in rear. So 2 tires are needed if difference exceeds 5%

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

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A lot of good advice in here, my bit is not good advice probably or even something I have any personal experience with, but I have heard tales of some tire shops being able to spin the tire and "trim" a couple 32nds of tread down to match one tire to another. Seems like you would need more than 8/32" (1/4") for that to be necessary.

I don't think you will have to worry about it based on tread depths you described.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
AWD or FWD CRV? If FWD... I see no issue. If AWD... a bit more care when replacing only one tire is in order.

What is most important when replacing a tire early due to some damage ---> same exact brand and model tire... so that tread traction and drive characteristics match... even for only FWD. But it is critically important for AWD to insure that the AWD systems operate properly and are not constantly fighting mismatched traction on the tires on one axle and trying to compensate with AWD.

Different shops will have different policies and recommendations on how much tread wear you can have on the remaining tire when placing a new matching tire on the other end of the axle. Generally if you have at least 50% tread left on the remaining tire, it's not an issue to replace only the damaged tire. If the Honda Dealer was OK with only replacing one tire, with the treadwear you indicated... then you are good to go in my view.. since they tend to be conservative. You could always go to Discount/Americas tire if you have one near by and get a second opinion before opting to buy an additional new tire.
It has nothing to do with that.

But until the OP returns with details about the exact vehicle there isn't a complete or correct answer.
Too much tire difference wont damage suspension, it is however very hard on the differential in the transmission if difference is too much. Not sure where anyone is coming up with anything suspension based. It's not coming to damage anything there.

Next a front wheel drive only just put the mismatch in the back and done. Dont even worry about it. Is it "best" to have 2 new tires, yes. Is it needed right now, hell no.

If yours is a 4wd or awd (I missed what year and your never said if it was fwd or 4wd/awd) that changes things.

True all wheel drive, you have 5% variation the drivetrain can handle, anything more you will damage things.

The old 4wd versions (realtime 4wd) must match tires per axle. Smallest/most worn in rear. So 2 tires are needed if difference exceeds 5%

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
Thanks for the feed back. Sorry, I have a 2017 Honda CRV LX AWD.

I might pop by the Honda dealer and talk to them again.
 

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These cars have independent suspensions. There will be no discernable difference in how it feels or operates. This thinking is of the antiquated variety from the old days when vehicles had rigid axles.
Type of suspension is NOT the issue.

Mismatched tires on an AWD CRV can and will put undue stress on the traction control systems, mostly on the axle with the mismatched tires. And you will hear it (and probably feel it to some degree) as the traction control and AWD systems try to compensate for the measured differences in each wheels spin and traction.

The bigger mismatch is generally different brand/model tires... not so much minor tread depth differences.
 

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No matter 4wd,fwd or awd, a few 32nds difference isn't going to hurt any part of the vehicle or register a difference in steering or handling characteristics. I challenge any of the know-it-alls to provide irrefutable proof that tire tread difference of 6/32" or less was ever the cause of transmission, differential or traction control system failure. Road surface and pitch differences far outweigh those of small treadwear differences and most of the time those go completely unnoticed. Don't you think the TPM would go off if the treadwear difference were enough to register rotational differences to the point of a part or system failure?
 

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No matter 4wd,fwd or awd, a few 32nds difference isn't going to hurt any part of the vehicle or register a difference in steering or handling characteristics. I challenge any of the know-it-alls to provide irrefutable proof that tire tread difference of 6/32" or less was ever the cause of transmission, differential or traction control system failure. Road surface and pitch differences far outweigh those of small treadwear differences and most of the time those go completely unnoticed. Don't you think the TPM would go off if the treadwear difference were enough to register rotational differences to the point of a part or system failure?
Other than your ambiguous insult, I agree Totally. Some people live/drive mostly curvy roads. The outside tires are constantly rotating a bit faster. No, the differential won’t explode. Spyder gears are always turning. You won’t get a longer powertrain Warranty if you only drive straight highways 😆
 
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