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Is there a issue with these? I decided to keep calling Honda Roadside instead of jumping it myself. One tow driver thought the FOB's were too close so we moved them to the back of the house. New battery still died. Is there a known phantom drain? Dealer told me to buy a trickle charger...my 97 Tacoma w/225k starts, can I not expect a 2019 to start?
 

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I have had my 2019/CR-V/Touring/AWD at the shop 3 times, got a new battery Monday, dead on Friday a.m. after it sat two days. I am going to keep calling Honda Roadside Assist and having it towed each time it's dead. If it cost them $1ks maybe they will wake up to the problem. I've been without a vehicle for over two weeks and only owned it for three months.
 

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There is another thread regarding this issue here;

https://www.crvownersclub.com/forum...7-yet-another-new-2019-cr-v-dead-battery.html

Buddy of mine has a 2018 Nissan Pathfinder with the same issue? They told him to purchase a trickle charger as well which is BS!!! However he did buy one and should he forget to plug in the battery is dead in 48 hrs? They have checked and re-checked to find drain with no luck? I realize that these new vehicles have a lot of added electronics that draw power but to kill the battery that quickly there has to be something major drawing on it.
 

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I have had my 2019/CR-V/Touring/AWD at the shop 3 times, got a new battery Monday, dead on Friday a.m. after it sat two days. I am going to keep calling Honda Roadside Assist and having it towed each time it's dead. If it cost them $1ks maybe they will wake up to the problem. I've been without a vehicle for over two weeks and only owned it for three months.
Man, that is just ridiculous. Does Lemon Law apply if it keeps happening? This should be Honda’s problem, not yours.
 

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We are on our second 2019 CRV Touring vehicle. We continue to have dead battery problems. And by dead, I mean nothing is on, no lights, can;t open door, etc. Had to open door with key to open the hood so it could be boosted. In the first month of having the 1st one, the battery died three times. !st time the dealer replaced the battery and charged it. 2nd they did a drain test - no drain, alternator OK and charged it and it died again. 3rd time the dealer gave us a brand new vehicle. Five days later - dead as a door nail again. Since then we have tried several things so I thought I would share my experiences and thoughts.
If you do a drain test (parasitic drain test) it passes just fine.
If you test the charging (the alternator), it passes just fine.
But the battery still gets drained dead.
My belief is that this is not a drain issue, it is a charging issue. But don't rule out a parasitic drain.
At our dealership, if a new car in lot has a dead battery they have found that if you run the car at idle, the battery will not charge. If you run it with the headlights on, the car will charge. And from my experience, the voltage is about the same when the car is "charging" when the headlights are on or off.
The dealer also indicated that the computer does not allow the alternator to charge the battery unless the engine is going over 2,000 RPM. And the CVT is programmed to not go over 2,000 RPM if at all possible. We have found that the CRV rarely goes over 2,000 RPM. Briefly at starts (depending on how heavy your foot is) and when it gets over 67 miles per hour. So in the normal course of driving in the daytime, the battery actually gets run down. By my testing, about 10-15% every time we drive it. So eventually, it just plain dies. The dealership suggested we drive with the headlights on all the time. We drove it for two days (70+ miles) with the headlights on and let it sit for 2 days - dead battery.
Meanwhile the dealership is testing the first car and cannot find a problem. But they are not driving the car.
By the way, the dealership has been has been absolutely wonderful throughout this whole process.
You hear all these reasons - new cars use a lot of electricity and need to be driven more frequently, you need to drive the car further, you need to be more aggressive in your driving, you need to drive with this button pushed or that one pushed when you park it. The bottom line for me is that there is something wrong with the computer programming around trying to get the most fuel mileage. All the solutions we have heard use more fuel!
As the GM at our dealership has said "you should not have to change your driving habits because of the car".
And whoever suggests using a trickle charger is nuts. If I have to plug in my car every night for it to be able to run then I might as well get an electric car.
Meanwhile, I monitor the voltage and when (not if) it gets too low, I run it with the headlights on until Honda gets this thing figured out.
 

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I've read a lot of dead battery issues on crv new and old. Can anyone be able to measure the draining or charging current with a digital DC current clamp meter like ebay. item UNI-T-UT210E-Digital-Clamp-Meter-Multimeter-Handheld-RMS-AC-DC-Mini-Resistanc-/252445358891. It has 2A/20A/100A ranges for DC current.

If we can clamp one onto the grounding cable on the battery, we should know about any leak and if the battery is being charged on idling right away.

BTW, someone said CRV was draining 0.5A after shutoff. With a 45AHr battery, it would be dead in less than 90 hours.
 

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Could the drain be caused by the security system? I recall reading an article about another brand that one of the switches on the hood did not close leaving part of the circuit always open. This caused the battery to go dead.
 

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Yes it can. The car has to listen to the remote and key. It will spend some energy. The question is how much. The clamp meter can give us an idea. For a small battery the standby time would not be too long if it spends too much.

The other issue is charging. I had a 1999 Sienna that shut itself down when caught in traffic jams in Toronto on HW401. Before I actually bought a clamp meter, using a simple volt meter I could still tell if I turned on one fan in full power, the battery was discharging even when the 3L engine was in fast idling at 1500 rpm.

Sienna has dual AC, i.e. 2 big blowers. If we turn both fans fully on, I am sure that we have to run the engine well over 2000 rpm before the alternator generates enough to get the battery charged instead of discharged. The 700-800 rpm with AC on when caught in stop and go traffic just wouldn't cut it. It was not even close.

If it drained for too long, the engine cut out and required a jump to restart. You can easily stuck for an hour going downtown Toronto, the battery is discharging instead of charging even though the engine is running!

That was a known design problem. In the past, alternators were not smart i.e. not related to engine control. There was actually an after market alternator to address this Sienna issue. It is probably not so much about the power output but the tuning of the alternator. Basically the alternator has to generate a voltage high enough at idling. (Engine has to provide sufficient torque at low rpm though. Not a problem for a 3L engine.) I always watched out for power consumption in bad traffic, kept the fans low when it wasn't moving, but my wife wouldn't... Sure, it's a problem, why should the car make the driver turn the fans down especially if it is brand new.

Heard that there is a new update coming up. SW may be able to reduce battery drain but I am not sure if SW can alter charging. Just like SW updates for OD, how can we repair the gap with SW if parts are already worn out.

Anyway it should not be too hard to figure out what to do if Honda really wants to do something about it. Good luck.
 

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Ohh well, it's a really shame.
I put deposit for 2019 one. Pick up day middle of April. I am going to take it back. I read so many stories about the OD and batteries problems that I have enough.
Will wait for rav4 2019 hybrid. Just need reliable car, that's it.
 

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We are on our second 2019 CRV Touring vehicle. We continue to have dead battery problems. And by dead, I mean nothing is on, no lights, can;t open door, etc. Had to open door with key to open the hood so it could be boosted. In the first month of having the 1st one, the battery died three times. !st time the dealer replaced the battery and charged it. 2nd they did a drain test - no drain, alternator OK and charged it and it died again. 3rd time the dealer gave us a brand new vehicle. Five days later - dead as a door nail again. Since then we have tried several things so I thought I would share my experiences and thoughts.
If you do a drain test (parasitic drain test) it passes just fine.
If you test the charging (the alternator), it passes just fine.
But the battery still gets drained dead.
My belief is that this is not a drain issue, it is a charging issue. But don't rule out a parasitic drain.
At our dealership, if a new car in lot has a dead battery they have found that if you run the car at idle, the battery will not charge. If you run it with the headlights on, the car will charge. And from my experience, the voltage is about the same when the car is "charging" when the headlights are on or off.
The dealer also indicated that the computer does not allow the alternator to charge the battery unless the engine is going over 2,000 RPM. And the CVT is programmed to not go over 2,000 RPM if at all possible. We have found that the CRV rarely goes over 2,000 RPM. Briefly at starts (depending on how heavy your foot is) and when it gets over 67 miles per hour. So in the normal course of driving in the daytime, the battery actually gets run down. By my testing, about 10-15% every time we drive it. So eventually, it just plain dies. The dealership suggested we drive with the headlights on all the time. We drove it for two days (70+ miles) with the headlights on and let it sit for 2 days - dead battery.
Meanwhile the dealership is testing the first car and cannot find a problem. But they are not driving the car.
By the way, the dealership has been has been absolutely wonderful throughout this whole process.
You hear all these reasons - new cars use a lot of electricity and need to be driven more frequently, you need to drive the car further, you need to be more aggressive in your driving, you need to drive with this button pushed or that one pushed when you park it. The bottom line for me is that there is something wrong with the computer programming around trying to get the most fuel mileage. All the solutions we have heard use more fuel!
As the GM at our dealership has said "you should not have to change your driving habits because of the car".
And whoever suggests using a trickle charger is nuts. If I have to plug in my car every night for it to be able to run then I might as well get an electric car.
Meanwhile, I monitor the voltage and when (not if) it gets too low, I run it with the headlights on until Honda gets this thing figured out.
Thank you for sharing the info, very informative
 

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Honda is aware of this problem. Apparently more and more reports of batteries going dead on 2019 CRV across the country. We have heard that Honda thinks that it is because the computer is not shutting down after the car is turned off. My testing continues to indicate that it is a charging problem vs a drain problem.
It would be great if folks could share what they are hearing from their Honda dealers about this issue.
I would also suggest asking the dealer if they also turn the headlights on whenever they have a vehicle with a dead battery and want to recharge the battery. And if so, why. And let us know.

Wasp09 rightfully suggests putting an amp meter into the circuit to test to see what drain is occurring. I am not yet ready to spend money on test equipment. Honda I'm sure has all kinds of sophisticated equipment that can track usage over time. I say over time because today's cars are getting pretty complex as to what shuts down and when. And as he says, 0.5 amps is huge.
 

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Ohh well, it's a really shame.
I put deposit for 2019 one. Pick up day middle of April. I am going to take it back. I read so many stories about the OD and batteries problems that I have enough.
Will wait for rav4 2019 hybrid. Just need reliable car, that's it.
If I read the comments on this forum I would not buy a CR-V. Luckily I didn't read them before buying my '17 Touring in January of 2017 and I have enjoyed this car more than any I have ever owned. (My last car was a 2012 CR-V EX-L which was also a wonderful car). In the 2+ years of owning this vehicle its never had gasoline in the oil. It often sits in the garage for several weeks at a time as we run around town in our 2015 FIT EX-L yet the battery has never gone dead. Its heater works great, all systems perform as expected.

All that said it does not mean that some vehicles have not had problems. But, around here you hear so much noise about the ones that have issues while the vast majority who do NOT have issues either never came here or got tired of hearing about this stuff and left. If you defend Honda on this forum there is a group here that will run you off. We have a lot of new Honda's in our family and none have any issues. Our daughter-in-law sold her Rav4 and got a new CR-V EX two months ago and is in love with it. I cautioned her before she bought it that while my CR_V was perfect there were "some" who have had issues. She noted that in their investigation of published government data on complaints that the ratio of complaints for say "engine" on the 2018 CR-V was one complaint per 724 vehicles. Another way to look at that number is that 99.9% of CR-V owners did NOT complain about this problem. She said she was confident with those statistics. (BTW: She held off buying the new CR-V until she had a chance to look at the new Rav4, a previous favorite of hers. She checked out the Rav and went straight to the Honda dealer and made a deal on the new CR-V.

I would tell anyone looking at any car (or tool, or appliance, etc) to do their research and look at the ratings. Its hard reading comments on a forum like this because the people with issues are far "louder" than the people who don't have problems. If I made decisions based on every complaint I read on the internet I would not own much of any of the products I have bought (and enjoyed) over the past ten years. Well over 99% of CR-V owners seem to not be reporting these issues that people are shouting about here as being rampant in "all" new CR-V's. As for those who have had issues that their dealer couldn't fix, that is another issue and most likely its a dealer issue and not Honda's. I spent three years being a technical consultant on a state Lemon Law board. Of the hundreds of cases that I participated in the most common factor in the vast majority of cases was not the company that built the vehicle but rather the dealer who was servicing the vehicle. I saw the manufacture buy back a lot of vehicles that could have easily been repaired on the first attempt had the dealership service department been more knowledgeable on the vehice's systems or had worked harder to get it right the first time.

If you don't want to buy a Honda based on what you read here, by all means, follow your heart. But like I said, in our family we have six late model Honda's (and over the years family members have bought over 30 new Honda's) and we have not had any serious issues. YMMV however.
 

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If you do a drain test (parasitic drain test) it passes just fine.
If you test the charging (the alternator), it passes just fine.
Tested in the dealer's shop?

But the battery still gets drained dead.
At your home? In a garage? At work? You/they need to do a drain test where the problem manifests itself.

There may be something that prevents the computer from going to its lowest power state. I had this happen on an Acura. I added a switch to turn off the trunk light, then left the trunk open to let it dry out. Two days later, dead battery. The computer was waiting for me to shut the trunk before going to sleep.

Do you leave a fob in the car, or close to it, at home, have a door or the tailgate not shut tight (e.g. in a garage)?
 

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If I read the comments on this forum I would not buy a CR-V. Luckily I didn't read them before buying my '17 Touring in January of 2017 and I have enjoyed this car more than any I have ever owned. (My last car was a 2012 CR-V EX-L which was also a wonderful car). In the 2+ years of owning this vehicle its never had gasoline in the oil. It often sits in the garage for several weeks at a time as we run around town in our 2015 FIT EX-L yet the battery has never gone dead. Its heater works great, all systems perform as expected.

All that said it does not mean that some vehicles have not had problems. But, around here you hear so much noise about the ones that have issues while the vast majority who do NOT have issues either never came here or got tired of hearing about this stuff and left. If you defend Honda on this forum there is a group here that will run you off. We have a lot of new Honda's in our family and none have any issues. Our daughter-in-law sold her Rav4 and got a new CR-V EX two months ago and is in love with it. I cautioned her before she bought it that while my CR_V was perfect there were "some" who have had issues. She noted that in their investigation of published government data on complaints that the ratio of complaints for say "engine" on the 2018 CR-V was one complaint per 724 vehicles. Another way to look at that number is that 99.9% of CR-V owners did NOT complain about this problem. She said she was confident with those statistics. (BTW: She held off buying the new CR-V until she had a chance to look at the new Rav4, a previous favorite of hers. She checked out the Rav and went straight to the Honda dealer and made a deal on the new CR-V.

I would tell anyone looking at any car (or tool, or appliance, etc) to do their research and look at the ratings. Its hard reading comments on a forum like this because the people with issues are far "louder" than the people who don't have problems. If I made decisions based on every complaint I read on the internet I would not own much of any of the products I have bought (and enjoyed) over the past ten years. Well over 99% of CR-V owners seem to not be reporting these issues that people are shouting about here as being rampant in "all" new CR-V's. As for those who have had issues that their dealer couldn't fix, that is another issue and most likely its a dealer issue and not Honda's. I spent three years being a technical consultant on a state Lemon Law board. Of the hundreds of cases that I participated in the most common factor in the vast majority of cases was not the company that built the vehicle but rather the dealer who was servicing the vehicle. I saw the manufacture buy back a lot of vehicles that could have easily been repaired on the first attempt had the dealership service department been more knowledgeable on the vehice's systems or had worked harder to get it right the first time.

If you don't want to buy a Honda based on what you read here, by all means, follow your heart. But like I said, in our family we have six late model Honda's (and over the years family members have bought over 30 new Honda's) and we have not had any serious issues. YMMV however.
Calling discussions here noise is disturbing.

Yes it may be not too big an issue to live with batteries going dead too quickly. Just like I lived with the battery may go dead in traffic jam when fans fully on for my 1999 Sienna. I did not buy the third party alternator. I carried a booster cable at the back of minivan. When we had bad weather hence bad traffic several days in a row, I hooked up a battery charger over night. I also warned my wife to turn fans low when stuck in traffic.

Actually I don't mind having a new battery every year under warranty, but every month will be too much.

Honda had SW update for 2017's and SW update for 2019's should be coming up. It is definitely a problem.

It is up to a potential buyer to consider the issue a show stopper or not. If you like the car nobody is going to stop you. :0

Anyway we are talking about the problem reported by an owner on this thread. It would be nice to understand the issue and find some workaround before Honda has a real fix.

My guess is that the battery is too small for a car with that many electronics and charging is very limited at slow traffic.
 

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Tests were done at the dealer's shop.
Battery goes dead at home - no garage, parked in driveway 35 from house.
Key FOB is 35 feet away.
I found that opening the hood to check the battery voltage causes the car to do something different. It knows the hood is open but not sure what it affects. I do know that the walk away locking won't work because it thinks you are still messing with the car.
In fact, anything you do will wake up the car. I tended to wait 1/2 hour to check voltages just in case but had the hood open.
So then I installed a connection to the battery that I can test outside the car without awakening the car at all. So I now test that way with no key anywhere near the car. So far, the battery has gone down about 5% per day with the car sitting there - no driving and everything closed up. But only have two days of testing so far. No indication that anything is on or open. I have no ammeter to test parasitic drain but I would hope Honda does. So checking battery charge via voltage is all I got.

All may be a moot issue since we are returning the car to the dealer and getting our trade in back and a refund.

Very sad but just cannot risk getting stranded given this CRV problem. Have a new Ridgeline sitting next to the CRV that is doing just fine. After the first new CRV we looked at all the competition and came away saying the CRV is the best vehicle for us all the way around - if it just ran of course. We will wait and monitor Honda's progress on finding and addressing this issue. If and when they do, we are all in again. BTW, the trade in was a 2000 Odyssey with 248,000 and starts every time.
 

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So, you've had TWO identical 2019 CR-V that both had the exact same issue? Both from the same dealer? I'm not denying you have this issue, it is just very strange indeed.

I wonder if the dealer has installed any alarm system or anti theft device that is causing a draw. I know where I live, many dealers install something in the OBD port under the steering wheel, and "disable it" if the buyer doesn't choose that added on accessory. Just wondering is this could have something to do with it.

I also find it odd that the dealer has allowed you to return one, and now perhaps a second new car to them.

I hope you get this issue resolved because you are right, the CR-V is one of the top choices in the segment, if not the top one.

One added comment, you discovered that the hood being open "wakes" the car. There is a hood open sensor that has been mentioned here that could be mis-adjusted....

I've parked my '18 Touring for vacations of one week and two weeks with no problem restarting upon return.
 

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... I know where I live, many dealers install something in the OBD port under the steering wheel, and "disable it" if the buyer doesn't choose that added on accessory. ...
What the? I've never heard of such a thing. Do you have more info on this?
 

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What the? I've never heard of such a thing. Do you have more info on this?
I've read about this many times also. Normally they install it out of sight on all new cars. Apparently sometimes they don't bother removing it when they sell the car. It is a very inexpensive unit also.
 

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I've read about this many times also. Normally they install it out of sight on all new cars. Apparently sometimes they don't bother removing it when they sell the car. It is a very inexpensive unit also.
Out of site, or installed in the OBD port? That would be pretty obvious and raise a red flag with me. What is their intended purpose, besides tracking your driving habits? Insurance companies are all over those things.
 

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What the? I've never heard of such a thing. Do you have more info on this?
Some of the dealers use it as an anti theft device while in their possession. While shopping, I have seen salespersons use the side of their fist, and pound the driver's side window, which allows the remote to unlock the car. Then when they sell the vehicle they try to sell the buyer the system. I'm sure it is configurable....I don't really know the details, or know much more about it, other than I have seen a new Toyota I bought in 2013 have some sort of "dummy" plug inserted into the OBD port, when I declined the anti-theft device.

In the OP's case, I was brainstorming and wondering if perhaps something like this is the reason for the battery drain? Sorry I don't know any more. I have NEVER purchased this added device.

I could be wrong as to the install location, perhaps it is installed in a similar location to the OBD port? Perhaps it looks like an OBD port???? Never really paid any attention t it after purchase.
 
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