Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I haven't seen an introductions area of the site so will quickly introduce myself and explain why I'm looking for a CRV. I live in Hereford, England, and do quite a bit of outdoor type stuff (camping, climbing etc.) I've always had landrovers; from classics to discoverys and most recently a defender which I sold at the start of summer because I couldn't keep up with the repairs. For every one thing I would fix, two things would go wrong!
With winter on it's way it's time to get a car and I want something cheap and reliable, but something that's still usable in snow etc. Honda CRV seems just about the most suitable vehicle and I love some of it's quirky features like the picnic table.

My budget is around 1500 quid, but I've found one for 900. It's a 2001 manual petrol model, in reasonable shape inside and out and everything works, but it's done 150,000 miles and I don't think the cambelt has been changed since around 80,000. I'm not sure how much a cambelt change would cost at a garage but I've rebuilt engines before so may attempt that myself. The clutch also felt high so I've concerns that it may need changing soon but I may be wrong. Both of those issues could be costly but are relatively easily sorted. What worries me are the following: There is a squeekyness that happens particularly on acceleration which I'm worried may be badly worn propshaft UJ's which display this symptom shortly before failure on landrovers. The other worry is that the car pulls heavily to the left, which could be as simple as tyre pressures or tracking but of course could be something more serious.

In honesty, I will probably go ahead and buy the car on the basis that even I have to spend some money on getting it sorted, I should still have a decent vehicle for under my budget. What do you guys think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
If your budget is 1500 and this one costs you 900 to get in, the real question is will the remaining 600 cover your getting it sorted?
Most people don't consider this added cost of buying a used car and spend the whole budget on the purchase. I think you've done your homework and should be OK. I don't know what labor rates are over in your neck of the woods but it sounds like you can do most of the fixin' up yourself. I think the one thing I'd investigate more thoroughly is the pulling to one side. Easy enough to check tire pressures, how does the wear on the treads look?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The tyre tread looked even but the left front did appear to be noticeably less inflated so fingers crossed it would be pressures. Realistically though, I imagine it'll be the bushes. In my experience when somethings replaced on the left, it's also done on the right, however the right sway bar bush has been replaced and the left hasn't. Having said that, none of the bushes seemed particularly bad.

On the rear however there was a large rubber bush behind/ on top of the differential. It looked like it needed changing, in fact it was cracked quite noticeably. Not sure if that could cause the car to veer left?

One question I do have about changing the prophaft UJ's is, can the be done yourself? I ask because I have read that the 'spider' is staked into the yoke, as opposed to held in by circlips, and that in most instances it is easier/ cheaper to simply buy a propshaft and replace the whole lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
I'd just buy the whole shaft rather than mess with the UJ's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Well, after being very tempted by a nissan x trail with only 100,000 miles and a full beige leather interior, and also several landrover freelanders I was won over by the humble honda. With it's dodgy steering, high milage, and mundane 90's interior I really don't know why I went for it! I can only put it down to not having the time/ energy to travel to go see the other vehicles, and of course the hondas reputed reliability. I'd be lying if I said I am not a little disappointed to be having the 'boring' honda on my drive, instead of the arguably more desirable landrover or nissan, but I take comfort in knowing I have a vehicle which can walk the walk (in terms of longevity), rather than one which may look the part, but which would likely result in most of my spent weekends chasing faults under the bonnet.

I wanted a cheap, reliable car that could take me all over the country, all year round on camping trips and adventure activities, but which I could also rely on to get me to work whenever the weather was too bad to ride my motorcycle. I may have to get busy with the spanners initially; changing bushes, and perhaps the cambelt but I should have a vehicle which I am not expecting to break down every 40 miles or so. Something of a luxury which I have not enjoyed during landrover ownership.

I always consider the first 100 miles of car ownership to be very telling. As you pick up on noises and nuances which you didn't notice before you bought it. Sometimes you realise faults you had missed before and have get sinking feeling but other times you're pleasantly surprised with undiscovered cubby holes, and things like that.
I'll pick the car up later and so long as all goes well on the drive home, I imagine I will be posting here much more often with tales of my adventures, and no doubt calling on the experience of the forum for help when things inevitably do go wrong.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top