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Hiya folks I have recently bought an used 2011 CRV EX which I am very pleased with. Everything worked as it should until I changed my mobile phone from an iphone to a samsung S10e and now my hands free telephone system does not connect to the phone and indeed the phone does not recognise the HFT. I have tried everything the voice command tells me to do but it now does not respond to my commands and even instructs me in a German language. On pressing the telephone call disconnect button for 5 seconds I am informed that the hands free system requires sevicing. I have been unable to discover how or what I must do to comply with this request. I would be grateful foe any information that can help me make progress. Thank you in advaance
 

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Welcome to the forum! I recommend reading the owner's manual - there may be a separate book for the Nav systems. Sounds like you need to reset it to default settings and start over. You might have to disconnect the battery in the process. Moving to Mobile Electronics for more exposure. Also, a 2011 is a Gen 3, not a Gen 4. Got a picture of the car?
 

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Have you made your phone "discoverable" for HFT to find?

My cousin has 2011 EX as well, and the same phone as you and his works fine. Do a hard reboot of your phone too.
 

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Hiya folks, many thanks for your advice. The manual was not very helpful with regards to the phone/cars lack of connectivity. but as soon as I re-connected my old i phone, the car recognised the phone immediately and the hands free system became responsive. I then deleted the i phone from the cars memory and re-installed the sim card into the new phone. The HFT system immediately began to respond to my commands and successfully installed my new phone into it's memory.
 

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Thanks for getting back to us with the fix! This kind of stuff is always handy to know, especially considering the frequent posts we see on these issues.
 

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Sim card and phone Bluetooth connection related ??
That is a new one. Is it even possible??
Or did I misunderstand the posted solution??
 

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Anything is possible. Bluetooth is very similar to USB in that it involves ever-evolving new generations of protocols, all supposed to be backward compatible with previous and future versions of the OS, the driver, the hardware, and the software, in every way, in every direction. And all this is supposed to work flawlessly while communicating and connecting, when it was developed in the US, built in China, and sold everywhere.

The thing about re-installing the sim card has to do with hard-rebooting the phone, and is a method that sometimes works around buggy OS reboots. Works better than slamming the phone against a wall. Usually. While these newer phones cost considerably more than $200, they are rarely, if ever, worth more. Same thing with OEM head units.
 

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Anything is possible. Bluetooth is very similar to USB in that it involves ever-evolving new generations of protocols, all supposed to be backward compatible with previous and future versions of the OS, the driver, the hardware, and the software, in every way, in every direction. And all this is supposed to work flawlessly while communicating and connecting, when it was developed in the US, built in China, and sold everywhere.

The thing about re-installing the sim card has to do with hard-rebooting the phone, and is a method that sometimes works around buggy OS reboots. Works better than slamming the phone against a wall. Usually. While these newer phones cost considerably more than $200, they are rarely, if ever, worth more. Same thing with OEM head units.
USB is plugged in and software makes connection if correct drivers are present
Bluetooth is on the other hand is more on the hardware side requiring correct version and then manual pairing of devices for the first time for security reasons. Once paired, future connection should be automatic and seamless.
OP here never mentioned pairing second phone to the vehicle that I saw. Maybe I missed it. He couldn't see either from the other device if I recall. He then swapped the sim card and said everything worked automatically? Possibly left out after swap he was able to then pair the two together. As you mentioned the phone may have done some hard reset.

I remember back with early cellular and Bluetooth 1.0 having less security the pass time was to so called 'bluejack' phones. You could send phone to phone messages without any intervention. There was even some early 'apps'. Then things progressed to where the recipient had to accept the message to get it. Now that seems locked up pretty tight that pairing now is required between the devices to communicate with one another.
 

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USB is plugged in and software makes connection if correct drivers are present
Bluetooth is on the other hand is more on the hardware side requiring correct version and then manual pairing of devices for the first time for security reasons. Once paired, future connection should be automatic and seamless.
OP here never mentioned pairing second phone to the vehicle that I saw. Maybe I missed it. He couldn't see either from the other device if I recall. He then swapped the sim card and said everything worked automatically? Possibly left out after swap he was able to then pair the two together. As you mentioned the phone may have done some hard reset.

I remember back with early cellular and Bluetooth 1.0 having less security the pass time was to so called 'bluejack' phones. You could send phone to phone messages without any intervention. There was even some early 'apps'. Then things progressed to where the recipient had to accept the message to get it. Now that seems locked up pretty tight that pairing now is required between the devices to communicate with one another.
The only difference between USB and Bluetooth is that USB is wired and Bluetooth not. As far as the progression and adoption of standards, and the interactivity between hardware, drivers, and OS's is concerned, they have followed (and still do) exactly the same path. It's not about security. Bluetooth pairing is just like USB hot-plugging. It's about making connection between specific hardware. Neither works without correct drivers, which is frequently where the issue lies when there is a problem. Pairing was always necessary. Bluetooth may seem more secure now but it's not, it's just smoother. But it is still quite hackable. It just isn't all that necessary any more since the phone can be hacked more easily. That hacking you refer to was not of the Bluetooth, anyway, it was of software.

In his second sentence he said "Everything worked as it should until I changed my mobile phone from an iphone to a samsung S10e and now my hands free telephone system does not connect to the phone and indeed the phone does not recognise the HFT." I see two phones mentioned. The first one, the iPhone, worked. The Samsung then did not, so the issue was with changing to a second, different phone.

He didn't say eeverything worked automatically. He said "as soon as I re-connected my old i phone, the car recognised the phone immediately and the hands free system became responsive. I then deleted the i phone from the cars memory and re-installed the sim card into the new phone. The HFT system immediately began to respond to my commands and successfully installed my new phone into it's memory." So, he first had to remove the iPhone pairing from the head unit. Once he did that, the head unit functioned correctly and paired up with the Samsung. So, what he describes here is not a Bluetooth issue, it's an issue with the crappy OEM head unit's built-in pairing software applet. Quite common amongst a lot of the stuff. It's still relatively early days for that software, and it gets better at about the same rate as all these other things - the speed of the sound of a snail crawling up a wall. A lot of this is due to the fact that lazy-a** head unit makers don't want to go to the trouble until they have to. This tendency applies, to at least some degree, to ALL the head unit manufacturers. It's also the reason they catch up so slowly and stay so forever far behind on literally every aspect of hardware and software. But you also don't pay as much for your high-zoot aftermarket head unit as you do for your top flight phone, either.

We won't talk about the severe overpricing of OEM head units, which are mostly worthless these days Which is something Honda should look at. It they want to make the head unit integral to the car in such a way as to make it non-replaceable with aftermarket, they need to require better quality units from the supplier. So there's that, too. The kind of issue this represents is reminiscent of early phone and computer issues, and is not something they want to lose car sales over, I would think. Unfortunately, they are lagging behind on this too, as that is happening to some degree. It's top of the list of things they need to tighten up on.
 

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The only difference between USB and Bluetooth is that USB is wired and Bluetooth not. As far as the progression and adoption of standards, and the interactivity between hardware, drivers, and OS's is concerned, they have followed (and still do) exactly the same path. It's not about security. Bluetooth pairing is just like USB hot-plugging. It's about making connection between specific hardware. Neither works without correct drivers, which is frequently where the issue lies when there is a problem. Pairing was always necessary. Bluetooth may seem more secure now but it's not, it's just smoother. But it is still quite hackable. It just isn't all that necessary any more since the phone can be hacked more easily. That hacking you refer to was not of the Bluetooth, anyway, it was of software.

In his second sentence he said "Everything worked as it should until I changed my mobile phone from an iphone to a samsung S10e and now my hands free telephone system does not connect to the phone and indeed the phone does not recognise the HFT." I see two phones mentioned. The first one, the iPhone, worked. The Samsung then did not, so the issue was with changing to a second, different phone.

He didn't say eeverything worked automatically. He said "as soon as I re-connected my old i phone, the car recognised the phone immediately and the hands free system became responsive. I then deleted the i phone from the cars memory and re-installed the sim card into the new phone. The HFT system immediately began to respond to my commands and successfully installed my new phone into it's memory." So, he first had to remove the iPhone pairing from the head unit. Once he did that, the head unit functioned correctly and paired up with the Samsung. So, what he describes here is not a Bluetooth issue, it's an issue with the crappy OEM head unit's built-in pairing software applet. Quite common amongst a lot of the stuff. It's still relatively early days for that software, and it gets better at about the same rate as all these other things - the speed of the sound of a snail crawling up a wall. A lot of this is due to the fact that lazy-a** head unit makers don't want to go to the trouble until they have to. This tendency applies, to at least some degree, to ALL the head unit manufacturers. It's also the reason they catch up so slowly and stay so forever far behind on literally every aspect of hardware and software. But you also don't pay as much for your high-zoot aftermarket head unit as you do for your top flight phone, either.

We won't talk about the severe overpricing of OEM head units, which are mostly worthless these days Which is something Honda should look at. It they want to make the head unit integral to the car in such a way as to make it non-replaceable with aftermarket, they need to require better quality units from the supplier. So there's that, too. The kind of issue this represents is reminiscent of early phone and computer issues, and is not something they want to lose car sales over, I would think. Unfortunately, they are lagging behind on this too, as that is happening to some degree. It's top of the list of things they need to tighten up on.
And don't get into the waste of a factory navigation that is obsolete when you buy it and map upgrades (also obsolete when sold) cost in the hundreds !! :oops:
 

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And don't get into the waste of a factory navigation that is obsolete when you buy it and map upgrades (also obsolete when sold) cost in the hundreds !! :oops:
You got that right! Of course, Nav is for people who are apparently not confident with unaided map reading. On the other hand, I never go anywhere I haven';t been before, because I've been everywhere. So I already know how to get there, and if I don't, I have a map in the glove box. As a last resort, I can always look at Google maps on my phone, because I'm not helpless.
 
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