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Discussion Starter #1
I don't notice any difference in speed when transmission is in D or S on a downgrade. I thought S was supposed to slow the car down. I have the EXL AWD and am concerned about driving in snow where I live. Has anyone driven a 2017 in snow and encountered any problems? It seems like I am using a lot of brake in either D or S even in normal conditions. I know in snowy conditions I can shift into L. The 2003 CRV I had was great in the snow. All I had to do was take it out of overdrive and put it in S.
 

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"S" is Sport Mode, I think L would give you the better engine breaking.

From owners manual, hope this helps.



Drive (S)
Used:
● For better acceleration
● To increase engine braking
● When going up or down hills
Low
● Used to further increase engine braking
● Used when going up or down hill


I don't notice any difference in speed when transmission is in D or S on a downgrade. I thought S was supposed to slow the car down. I have the EXL AWD and am concerned about driving in snow where I live. Has anyone driven a 2017 in snow and encountered any problems? It seems like I am using a lot of brake in either D or S even in normal conditions. I know in snowy conditions I can shift into L. The 2003 CRV I had was great in the snow. All I had to do was take it out of overdrive and put it in S.
 

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Haven't driven in snow but deceleration is definitely noticeably quicker in S, foot off the gas, L is even quicker decel. Are you possibly a left footed braker with your right foot still on the gas?
 

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I think the difference of opinions has to do with the hill. We recently returned from a road trip vacation thru the mountains of PA, NY, VT and NH. We encountered plenty of “Trucks MUST Use Low Gear” / “30,000 Pounds of Bananas” hills and S did very little that we could notice. L, on the other hand, worked pretty well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
D or S

It just seems that I am having to brake a lot on downgrade in both D and S. On one particular curve I slow down to 32 mph. I then don't use the brake, on purpose, just to see how much speed I pick up before reaching a particular point in the road. The car reaches about 51 mph at that point and that is in D. It is only a mile or two slower in S. I don't left foot brake. I will just have to use L when driving in snow which I don't mind. It was just my understanding that S would slow the speed. Thanks for your input.
 

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I think the difference of opinions has to do with the hill. We recently returned from a road trip vacation thru the mountains of PA, NY, VT and NH. We encountered plenty of “Trucks MUST Use Low Gear” / “30,000 Pounds of Bananas” hills and S did very little that we could notice. L, on the other hand, worked pretty well.
Congrats: Winner Harry Chapin In Memoriam Award!!!!!!!
 

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And what are you're RPMS when you are shifting at that high speed for the lower running gears. Also when your at that high speed are you in sports mode? or Eco mode?
 

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I live on a steep hill with a 25 mph speed limit and drive down in L and still have to use the brakes at times. At freeway speed, usually throw it into S for slight braking. Would say equivalent to disabling overdrive on an automatic trans.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
D or S

I haven't checked the RPMs. I didn't make a downshift into S as I was already in it. I just don't see any appreciable difference between the two other than when going uphill. I will definitely drive in L when snowy or icy. I like the cvt on level roads but not in mountains. Seems that I have to do a lot of braking and I don't drive like there is no tomorrow. I wonder what sort of mileage I will get out of a set of brakes? Probably not good. Thanks for your replies.
 

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These smaller displacement higher revving engines don't have a lot of engine braking. Maybe that's why, at times, the CVT ratio is used to assist with station keeping in lower deceleration scenarios.
 
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