Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 72 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know this is the hot topic right now, and sorry if its been asked. I don't get on here all too often (you guys are great though, and ill have to make more of an effort). It was super cold last night (16F). Took the car a few minutes to warm up, but when it was on high and after driving a bit it became so hot that I had to turn the heat down. I will say at idle it didn't seem as warm. Is this the same problem everyone else is having? Is it happening to ALL Crvs or just a select few?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
I know this is the hot topic right now, and sorry if its been asked. I don't get on here all too often (you guys are great though, and ill have to make more of an effort). It was super cold last night (16F). Took the car a few minutes to warm up, but when it was on high and after driving a bit it became so hot that I had to turn the heat down. I will say at idle it didn't seem as warm. Is this the same problem everyone else is having? Is it happening to ALL Crvs or just a select few?

Thanks.
It's definitely happening to me and many others. My hunch is that this problem (along with oil dilution) is common to all late model CR-Vs but most people don't really notice it. It's a very big problem for Honda. They have come up with a "fix", which I had applied to my car and makes little noticeable difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
No being to hot is not the problem people are having. It means your vehicle is doing fine. The people with the problem are getting no heat even after having the car running for 20 or 30 minutes. The cars with the problem also can see their temperature gauge drop back down to zero if they are at a stop and just idling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
988 Posts
I know this is the hot topic right now, and sorry if its been asked. I don't get on here all too often (you guys are great though, and ill have to make more of an effort). It was super cold last night (16F). Took the car a few minutes to warm up, but when it was on high and after driving a bit it became so hot that I had to turn the heat down. I will say at idle it didn't seem as warm. Is this the same problem everyone else is having? Is it happening to ALL Crvs or just a select few?

Thanks.
Might be good to keep it all in the same thread versus starting another.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
It's definitely happening to me and many others. My hunch is that this problem (along with oil dilution) is common to all late model CR-Vs but most people don't really notice it. It's a very big problem for Honda. They have come up with a "fix", which I had applied to my car and makes little noticeable difference.
Common to all and most don't realize it. Really. Wow. How many of the 1/2 million or so sold have you checked.? The problem is some have it some don't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,174 Posts
.......but common to “all” late model CRVs?:Hmmmmm:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
.......but common to “all” late model CRVs?:Hmmmmm:
Simple substituion:

My feeling or guess (based on intuition rather than fact) is that this problem (along with oil dilution) is common to all late model CR-Vs but most people don't really notice it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,174 Posts
So all late model CRVs have a heat problem and all CRV owners just say/think....oh well.:headscratch:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,185 Posts
Simple substituion:

My feeling or guess (based on intuition rather than fact) is that this problem (along with oil dilution) is common to all late model CR-Vs but most people don't really notice it.

I think that is a "feeling" but what is it based on? Comments here? Twenty or fifty or whatever number of people reporting an issue when half of million cars have been sold? I am certain that SOME people have a real problem. I am certain that if they do have a problem it is reasonable to demand that Honda to address what is wrong. (It is also the law, you have a warranty on that car). I am also CERTAIN that many do NOT have these problems. I am guessing that if these problems were as wide spread as some would have you believe that Honda would be in big trouble right now.

Back on the last generation of the CR-V there was an issue of the heater cores getting stopped up on some CR-V's due to material from the block stopping up the heater core. ( They must have not cleaned some of them out well enough during manufacturing). Many owners got this repaired under warranty by Honda if I recall. I have run into people who never got it fixed and now dealers want a ton of money to replace their heater cores as the cars are long since out of warranty. If I had a new car and it had legitimate issues I would calmly take it back in and have this problem documented in writing on repair orders. If my car did not get fixed I would have a thermometer in my heat outlet and record times, temperatures and driving conditions and then compare this to another car of the same model and see how the numbers match up. This would clearly demonstrate that my car actually was NOT normal. After three trips to the dealer without being fixed I would then file a Lemon Law case following the instructions in the manual given to me with my new car. Of course there is a time limit on this and you need to follow the directions for your state.

To have this position I went through the training given by the national organization for this. Our instructors were professional attorneys who had handled major national level cases like Walmart vrs. VISA, etc. I then spent three years as a member on a Lemon Law board in my state. I have resolved hundreds, if not over a thousand, Lemon Law cases. I was the "technical expert" on the team based on my 40 year professional career in the automotive field. It was my job to look at the technical facts (not emotions, hear-say, "I read it on the internet" stuff). Like Joe Friday I just wanted the facts. Facts don't lie folks. And if I had to decide on case I needed the best, most impartial facts. I didn't care about what you thought or what someone else told you. Also on our team we have a consumer relations expert, a dealer principal (someone who owned a dealership and knew how a dealer interacted with customers and the car company) and we also had a "normal person" who was not an expert on cars. Their job was to see the case from the point of view of a normal person without deep technical knowledge. The final team member was a "referee". She did not get to vote and was there to answer any legal question as to the laws of that state and the consumer laws as the applied to our decisions. When we made a decision ( which could cost the car company many thousands of dollars in some cases) we did a written report to show why we voted the way we did. In simple English we were accountable for our actions. We did not get to vote on emotions.

This team was very well rounded and saw the case from all points of view. We worked hard to be fair to all parties including the car company, the dealership and the consumer. Normally when all the FACTS were laid out and everyone agreed on them it was not difficult to come to a decision. Facts do not lie. The better the facts the better the outcome.

I am not trying to fluff anything off or be cold but in the real world its FACTS that matter when dealing with technical and legal matters. Your (or my) opinion don't amount to a hill of beans without the FACTS to back them up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
I think that is a "feeling" but what is it based on? Comments here? Twenty or fifty or whatever number of people reporting an issue when half of million cars have been sold? I am certain that SOME people have a real problem. I am certain that if they do have a problem it is reasonable to demand that Honda to address what is wrong. (It is also the law, you have a warranty on that car). I am also CERTAIN that many do NOT have these problems. I am guessing that if these problems were as wide spread as some would have you believe that Honda would be in big trouble right now.

Back on the last generation of the CR-V there was an issue of the heater cores getting stopped up on some CR-V's due to material from the block stopping up the heater core. ( They must have not cleaned some of them out well enough during manufacturing). Many owners got this repaired under warranty by Honda if I recall. I have run into people who never got it fixed and now dealers want a ton of money to replace their heater cores as the cars are long since out of warranty. If I had a new car and it had legitimate issues I would calmly take it back in and have this problem documented in writing on repair orders. If my car did not get fixed I would have a thermometer in my heat outlet and record times, temperatures and driving conditions and then compare this to another car of the same model and see how the numbers match up. This would clearly demonstrate that my car actually was NOT normal. After three trips to the dealer without being fixed I would then file a Lemon Law case following the instructions in the manual given to me with my new car. Of course there is a time limit on this and you need to follow the directions for your state.

To have this position I went through the training given by the national organization for this. Our instructors were professional attorneys who had handled major national level cases like Walmart vrs. VISA, etc. I then spent three years as a member on a Lemon Law board in my state. I have resolved hundreds, if not over a thousand, Lemon Law cases. I was the "technical expert" on the team based on my 40 year professional career in the automotive field. It was my job to look at the technical facts (not emotions, hear-say, "I read it on the internet" stuff). Like Joe Friday I just wanted the facts. Facts don't lie folks. And if I had to decide on case I needed the best, most impartial facts. I didn't care about what you thought or what someone else told you. Also on our team we have a consumer relations expert, a dealer principal (someone who owned a dealership and knew how a dealer interacted with customers and the car company) and we also had a "normal person" who was not an expert on cars. Their job was to see the case from the point of view of a normal person without deep technical knowledge. The final team member was a "referee". She did not get to vote and was there to answer any legal question as to the laws of that state and the consumer laws as the applied to our decisions. When we made a decision ( which could cost the car company many thousands of dollars in some cases) we did a written report to show why we voted the way we did. In simple English we were accountable for our actions. We did not get to vote on emotions.

This team was very well rounded and saw the case from all points of view. We worked hard to be fair to all parties including the car company, the dealership and the consumer. Normally when all the FACTS were laid out and everyone agreed on them it was not difficult to come to a decision. Facts do not lie. The better the facts the better the outcome.

I am not trying to fluff anything off or be cold but in the real world its FACTS that matter when dealing with technical and legal matters. Your (or my) opinion don't amount to a hill of beans without the FACTS to back them up.
Great post, thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
From the sounds of it then I don't have the same problem you all are having. Just feel like it takes a tad longer to heat up than other cars Im used to. But once the heat is going, its warm/hot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
I think that is a "feeling" but what is it based on? Comments here? Twenty or fifty or whatever number of people reporting an issue when half of million cars have been sold? I am certain that SOME people have a real problem. I am certain that if they do have a problem it is reasonable to demand that Honda to address what is wrong. (It is also the law, you have a warranty on that car). I am also CERTAIN that many do NOT have these problems. I am guessing that if these problems were as wide spread as some would have you believe that Honda would be in big trouble right now.

Back on the last generation of the CR-V there was an issue of the heater cores getting stopped up on some CR-V's due to material from the block stopping up the heater core. ( They must have not cleaned some of them out well enough during manufacturing). Many owners got this repaired under warranty by Honda if I recall. I have run into people who never got it fixed and now dealers want a ton of money to replace their heater cores as the cars are long since out of warranty. If I had a new car and it had legitimate issues I would calmly take it back in and have this problem documented in writing on repair orders. If my car did not get fixed I would have a thermometer in my heat outlet and record times, temperatures and driving conditions and then compare this to another car of the same model and see how the numbers match up. This would clearly demonstrate that my car actually was NOT normal. After three trips to the dealer without being fixed I would then file a Lemon Law case following the instructions in the manual given to me with my new car. Of course there is a time limit on this and you need to follow the directions for your state.

To have this position I went through the training given by the national organization for this. Our instructors were professional attorneys who had handled major national level cases like Walmart vrs. VISA, etc. I then spent three years as a member on a Lemon Law board in my state. I have resolved hundreds, if not over a thousand, Lemon Law cases. I was the "technical expert" on the team based on my 40 year professional career in the automotive field. It was my job to look at the technical facts (not emotions, hear-say, "I read it on the internet" stuff). Like Joe Friday I just wanted the facts. Facts don't lie folks. And if I had to decide on case I needed the best, most impartial facts. I didn't care about what you thought or what someone else told you. Also on our team we have a consumer relations expert, a dealer principal (someone who owned a dealership and knew how a dealer interacted with customers and the car company) and we also had a "normal person" who was not an expert on cars. Their job was to see the case from the point of view of a normal person without deep technical knowledge. The final team member was a "referee". She did not get to vote and was there to answer any legal question as to the laws of that state and the consumer laws as the applied to our decisions. When we made a decision ( which could cost the car company many thousands of dollars in some cases) we did a written report to show why we voted the way we did. In simple English we were accountable for our actions. We did not get to vote on emotions.

This team was very well rounded and saw the case from all points of view. We worked hard to be fair to all parties including the car company, the dealership and the consumer. Normally when all the FACTS were laid out and everyone agreed on them it was not difficult to come to a decision. Facts do not lie. The better the facts the better the outcome.

I am not trying to fluff anything off or be cold but in the real world its FACTS that matter when dealing with technical and legal matters. Your (or my) opinion don't amount to a hill of beans without the FACTS to back them up.
Your words:

I am also CERTAIN that many do NOT have these problems.

Oh, really? By your standards, you have done a study of thousands and thousands of cars and come to this conclusion. Congratulations.

Just becuase a person doesn't KNOW that they have a problem does not mean that they DO NOT have it.

If the design of an engine is inherently flawed, then all vehicles will exhibit the same characteristics and issues. GDI (especially with turbos) are known to have oil dilution. Excess fuel is expected to be burned off when the car reaches normal operating temperatures. Even Honda admits this. When a vehicle is "so efficient" that it cannot maintain engine temperature when in idle, you have a big problem with oil dilution. Honda attributes this to people's driving habits (excessive idling, short trips). Well, guess what? A lot of people take short trips. A car is supposed be able to do this. I did not spend $40,000 for a car that I can't remote start in winter so it can warm up and clear the frost on my windows. I had "the fix" applied to my vehicle and it did nothing to alleviate these issues. Honda has even admitted to people in these groups (i.e. Genesis) that they don't have a solution for this yet and don't even know when they will.

Ultimately, you can go on your "fact finding" mission, but we have lives to live and I'm tired of waiting for Honda. Time will tell what effect this will have on Honda's reputation but, as a previous owner of 11 Hondas, I am done with them.
 

·
Super Moderator - How may I help?
Joined
·
3,671 Posts
Your words:

I am also CERTAIN that many do NOT have these problems.

Oh, really? By your standards, you have done a study of thousands and thousands of cars and come to this conclusion. Congratulations.

Just becuase a person doesn't KNOW that they have a problem does not mean that they DO NOT have it.

If the design of an engine is inherently flawed, then all vehicles will exhibit the same characteristics and issues. GDI (especially with turbos) are known to have oil dilution. Excess fuel is expected to be burned off when the car reaches normal operating temperatures. Even Honda admits this. When a vehicle is "so efficient" that it cannot maintain engine temperature when in idle, you have a big problem with oil dilution. Honda attributes this to people's driving habits (excessive idling, short trips). Well, guess what? A lot of people take short trips. A car is supposed be able to do this. I did not spend $40,000 for a car that I can't remote start in winter so it can warm up and clear the frost on my windows. I had "the fix" applied to my vehicle and it did nothing to alleviate these issues. Honda has even admitted to people in these groups (i.e. Genesis) that they don't have a solution for this yet and don't even know when they will.

Ultimately, you can go on your "fact finding" mission, but we have lives to live and I'm tired of waiting for Honda. Time will tell what effect this will have on Honda's reputation but, as a previous owner of 11 Hondas, I am done with them.
Mike881881, are you in Canada? I don't think there is a $40,000 CR-V in the US. Just asking.
 

·
Registered
2017 Honda CRV EXL Molten Lava Red
Joined
·
131 Posts
So all late model CRVs have a heat problem and all CRV owners just say/think....oh well.:headscratch:
My EXL has electric heated seats, it takes a few minutes for them to heat, but that's a hell of a lot better than non-heated seats. Ive lived through Minnesota and now Vermont winters. I get in and drive the car, I wear gloves, coat, wool scarf(in other words I dress for winter). The car heats desired temperature within 3 miles of driving. heat in a car is relative to exterior temperatures. We're comfortable, I always have my cold weather kit in the cars I drive, candles, matches, handwarmers, small shovel(in case I get stuck). This car has heated outside mirrors, and blocking in front of radiator. I have driven in over 60 winters and never once was I cold. The car even gives me a temperature to set the heat at, if I set above 68 degrees its like an oven. Open the hood, its a tiny engine, and the heat part is almost the same size as the engine. When I was a kid, we rode with blankets over our laps, and heated plates of glass on the windshield interior so we could see down the road. This CRv is way, way better than that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
988 Posts
My EXL has electric heated seats, it takes a few minutes for them to heat, but that's a hell of a lot better than non-heated seats. Ive lived through Minnesota and now Vermont winters. I get in and drive the car, I wear gloves, coat, wool scarf(in other words I dress for winter). The car heats desired temperature within 3 miles of driving. heat in a car is relative to exterior temperatures. We're comfortable, I always have my cold weather kit in the cars I drive, candles, matches, handwarmers, small shovel(in case I get stuck). This car has heated outside mirrors, and blocking in front of radiator. I have driven in over 60 winters and never once was I cold. The car even gives me a temperature to set the heat at, if I set above 68 degrees its like an oven. Open the hood, its a tiny engine, and the heat part is almost the same size as the engine. When I was a kid, we rode with blankets over our laps, and heated plates of glass on the windshield interior so we could see down the road. This CRv is way, way better than that!
It's a ridiculously low bar for comparison. It's hard to imagine anyone being content with a modern $30k to $40k vehicle with insufficient ability to de-ice the front windshield or side windows. I haven't heard of any CRV competitor having these problems. There's no getting around it, Honda didn't adequately design and test the 1.5L prior to production roll out.
 
1 - 20 of 72 Posts
Top