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This is an update to the thread, " Now I'm scared! Am I making a mistake?"

https://www.crvownersclub.com/forum...851-now-im-scared-am-i-making-mistake-13.html

First, I'm sorry! I didn't mean to start a food fight. Seems OD (see I've been around long enough now to know the acronym!) is a contentious issue...

Second, thanks to everyone who participated. It was very helpful, and did help me make up mind. I've decided to go forward with purchasing a new CR-V. I believe OD is a real issue and not imaginary, but it seem to affect only a small number of vehicles, and primarily in cold areas. (I'm in Southern California.) I am going to hope I don't get a lemon, but monitor the oil levels carefully so if I do get one, I can be right on it take it up with Honda.

By the way, someone on the other thread was saying they'd checked Consumer Reports and there was no mention of oil dilution or engine related issues. It turns out that Consumer Reports has identified the CR-V as having these problems. See below:


https://www.consumerreports.org/car-repair-maintenance/honda-cr-v-affected-by-engine-trouble/

https://www.consumerreports.org/car...-cr-v-turbo-engine-fix-details-rollout-plans/

I think both "sides" are right. There are issues, and most cars don't suffer from them. No need to continue the discussion here. I just wanted to let people that the thread was helpful for me, thank them for participating, and let them know what I decided personally. Thanks again!
 

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Thank you for this post. You took the high road, and it is appreciated!
 

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Check the oil level of your new CRV right at the dealer before you drive home.

Reason: some owners have reported their vehicles coming from the factory with more then 3.7 quarts of oil.

Also.. note that sometimes dealers put 4.5 quarts in on an oil change rather then 3.7.... so you need to check immediately after an oil change. Sloppy shop work, and I would encourage you to raise it with the service manager immediately if you see it.

Extra oil does not seem to affect CRVs negatively (even though the manual tells owners NOT to do it... which I find ironic) .....but it does cloud and muddy up the issue of keeping tabs on OD.

Enjoy your new CRV. :)
 

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Check the oil level of your new CRV right at the dealer before you drive home.
Hint on doing that. Make sure the car is level. You will discover the dipstick was designed by someone who thought it looked cool on their design computer but who clearly never checked their own oil. The very thin oil combined with the very orange dipstick makes reading it difficult in the best of times. In fact, Honda engineers eventually painted their's white while studying the OD issue. AND here is something I've discovered, when reinserting the dipstick after wiping it off try to put in as straight and gentle as you can. Pull it out straight and gentle as you can, trying not to rub the sides of the shaft. It is impossible to pull it out without some rubbing. Why take such pains when checking? If I do it my method I am right on the full mark. If I do it the way I've always done on any other car, i.e., wipe it off, stick it, pull it out and read it, it will read 1/4" higher and be above the top of the orange. If its still difficult to read, lay it flat onto paper towel and press it down, slide to the side and you can see where the oil stain is in relation to the dipstick.
 

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yep. Last time I tried tell someone to do it the way I found works (that was not on a Forum-thread) they said I was incorrect. I don't wipe it and check a second time, read on to find out why...
Let it sit as long as possible until fully cool, overnight is best. On as flat a surface as possible. Always make sure the dipstick is fully inserted. Not when you check, but before. Pull it out careful, try to be smooth, not rubbing side to side on the tube. Read. If you wipe and push it all the way back in, it's smeared. One side is higher than the other, and intermittent smears 4 inches up the stick. I'm starting to feel at home here on this Forum. OP says; "No need to continue the discussion here." I say, let me clarify that.
And, let me clarify - mine is a 2015 2.4L, so all metal except for the plastic handle-pull on top. :)
2017-present-official-specs-features-etc-gen-5. Hmm, no wonder I 'm not making any friends. After adding a few more thoughts will just lurk and hope to find something to help my family member. If I tried to explain OD they wouldn't sleep well for at least a Week, and they won't be diving under the hood anytime. Again, mine is last gen, and if I don't let it sit for hours there is oil smeared all over the stick even after wiping reinserting. Last vehicle was a 2012 Forester and it was worse, impossible to get an accurate read unless it sat for many, many hours. Oil smears 6" or more up the stick, one side higher than the other, etc. I would like it VERY much if I could check my oil level after sitting for 3 minutes. Hope this addendum is well written.
[When used as a predicate adjective, there's no hyphen, as in, "That book is "well written."]
 

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I'm no newbie when it comes to cars ... worked as an engineer in the industry for 35+ years, have owned 61 vehicles, and done a lot of my own maintenance work over the years (anybody remember the old canister oil filters ?). But reading this CR-V dipstick has me going batty ... very difficult to judge. I've always checked oil level when fully cool, waiting hours if not overnight. But are people saying to check the dipstick on the first pull, ie. don't pull it, wipe it, reinsert, then pull again to take the reading (ie. old school way) ? Maybe that's my problem because I can hardly see anything on my dipstick ...
 

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I'm no newbie when it comes to cars ... worked as an engineer in the industry for 35+ years, have owned 61 vehicles, and done a lot of my own maintenance work over the years (anybody remember the old canister oil filters ?). But reading this CR-V dipstick has me going batty ... very difficult to judge. I've always checked oil level when fully cool, waiting hours if not overnight. But are people saying to check the dipstick on the first pull, ie. don't pull it, wipe it, reinsert, then pull again to take the reading (ie. old school way) ? Maybe that's my problem because I can hardly see anything on my dipstick ...
Not only do I remember the canister oil filters, but my first car, which I bought used, didn't even have a factory oil filter. First year of Chevy small block V8. 1955. I've also owned in the neighborhood of 60 cars, and "worked in" (I'll leave it at that) several auto dealer service departments.

Regarding reading the AWFUL dipstick, many here have removed the orange plastic, after marking the high and low points on the metal. They bought a new dipstick for use when they take the car into the dealer.
 

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Regarding reading the AWFUL dipstick, many here have removed the orange plastic, after marking the high and low points on the metal. They bought a new dipstick for use when they take the car into the dealer.
I bought a factory dipstick and removed the orange plastic and etched low/high marks. Didn't even bother to put the stock one back in when I took it to the dealer for the 2nd service and nothing was mentioned...
 

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I believe OD is a real issue and not imaginary, but it seem to affect only a small number of vehicles, and primarily in cold areas. (I'm in Southern California.)
FYI, I have a 2017 and live in SoCal and so far haven't seen any evidence of OD.
 

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Hint on doing that. Make sure the car is level. You will discover the dipstick was designed by someone who thought it looked cool on their design computer but who clearly never checked their own oil. The very thin oil combined with the very orange dipstick makes reading it difficult in the best of times. In fact, Honda engineers eventually painted their's white while studying the OD issue. AND here is something I've discovered, when reinserting the dipstick after wiping it off try to put in as straight and gentle as you can. Pull it out straight and gentle as you can, trying not to rub the sides of the shaft. It is impossible to pull it out without some rubbing. Why take such pains when checking? If I do it my method I am right on the full mark. If I do it the way I've always done on any other car, i.e., wipe it off, stick it, pull it out and read it, it will read 1/4" higher and be above the top of the orange. If its still difficult to read, lay it flat onto paper towel and press it down, slide to the side and you can see where the oil stain is in relation to the dipstick.
Very good post and very true. If you pull up that dipstick it will typically have oil all over the metal because it's rubbing against lubricated parts. You really have to clean it off properly the insert and pull it out carefully. You still get some oil on the metal but it's much more obvious where the real level is.

Rob
 

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I removed the orange plastic quite some time back......much easier to read the all metal stick. I also noticed that the almost vertical dipstick has a slight bend in it so that the tip, once fully inserted, is a little more toward the rear of the car. I slightly/gently exaggerated/increased the bend so that the tip would be a little further to the rear. Not much, just a little. Don't even wipe the stick off now.....just pull it, check the level (which has remained the same/perfect for 10K miles) and put it back in. Oil level gets easier to read once the oil starts to darken a little. I check daily. When I pul the car into the garage and turn the motor off, the hood gets poped/raised every time. Old habit and just weird that way.

I prefer checking the oil level cold......the new oil being added/refilling the motor is cold (room temp), right? And you always check the new/fresh/cold oil level to check your work before cleaning your tools and closing the hood, right?

As previously stated, always check the oil level immediately after the service has been done. Between the Min/Max marks on the stick is perfect.
 

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So the topic gone off course and closed. If the OP has now got his CRV by now Do you like it and what can you tll others why you were scared because others the horror stories you read, the damaging cars you seen on the road with your special Sunglasses that Roddy piper had in They Live. Etc Etc....

Our V scaires us all the time its Haunted!!!!
 

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...

I prefer checking the oil level cold......the new oil being added/refilling the motor is cold (room temp), right? And you always check the new/fresh/cold oil level to check your work before cleaning your tools and closing the hood, right?

As previously stated, always check the oil level immediately after the service has been done. Between the Min/Max marks on the stick is perfect.
I agree with this, except I would add letting the engine run for about 30 seconds after a change. You want to make sure there are no leaks. Then, if all's well you can close the hood and put your tools away. A long time ago, I replaced the oil in my 1975 T/A. The gasket from the old filter didn't come off with it and I ended up doubling up. Not a good thing, as I now had several quarts of oil spilling on my driveway. :Notagain:

OP, congrats on making your decision and I good luck with your purchase!
 

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yep. Last time I tried tell someone to do it the way I found works (not on a Forum-thread) they said I was incorrect. I don't wipe it and check a second time, read on to find out why...
Let it sit as long as possible until fully cool, overnight is best. On as flat a surface as possible. Always make sure the dipstick is fully inserted. Not when you check, but before. Pull it out careful, try to be smooth, not rubbing side to side on the tube. Read. If you wipe and push it all the way back in, it's smeared. One side is higher than the other, and intermittent smears 4 inches up the stick. I'm starting to feel at home here on this Forum. OP says; "No need to continue the discussion here." I say, let me clarify that.
And, let me clarify - mine is a 2015 2.4L, so all metal except for the plastic handle-pull on top. :)
I'm no newbie when it comes to cars ... worked as an engineer in the industry for 35+ years, have owned 61 vehicles, and done a lot of my own maintenance work over the years (anybody remember the old canister oil filters ?). But reading this CR-V dipstick has me going batty ... very difficult to judge. I've always checked oil level when fully cool, waiting hours if not overnight. But are people saying to check the dipstick on the first pull, ie. don't pull it, wipe it, reinsert, then pull again to take the reading (ie. old school way) ? Maybe that's my problem because I can hardly see anything on my dipstick ...
Check your owners manual, Honda states to only wait 3 minutes after shutting off the engine to check your oil. Waiting overnight will not provide an accurate reading for this engine. Yes this different than any car you've owned in the past, but that's coming direct from the manufacturer, so if you check it the way Honda says to, I'm sure the level will not be as high as it would be if you wait overnight.
 

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Check your owners manual, Honda states to only wait 3 minutes after shutting off the engine to check your oil. Waiting overnight will not provide an accurate reading for this engine. Yes this different than any car you've owned in the past, but that's coming direct from the manufacturer, so if you check it the way Honda says to, I'm sure the level will not be as high as it would be if you wait overnight.
OMG, here we go again. :wall:
 

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Check your owners manual, Honda states to only wait 3 minutes after shutting off the engine to check your oil. Waiting overnight will not provide an accurate reading for this engine. Yes this different than any car you've owned in the past, but that's coming direct from the manufacturer, so if you check it the way Honda says to, I'm sure the level will not be as high as it would be if you wait overnight.
The difference between 3 minutes shutoff and overnight is almost indistinguishable. The biggest failure among many owners is misreading the oil above the orange due to it being leftover in the dipstick tube. It sometimes takes several readings to come to a conclusion.

It's actually quite funny that we have to discuss it so often.
 

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OP, congrats on your new car. Enjoy it. Even if your car has OD, unless the oil level keeps on increasing really high and becomes a serious problem, a moderate amount of OD is OK. It's a long term thing and I'm not sure it is even going to be a problem. Time will tell but IT IS NOT A LEMON.
 

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Very good post and very true. If you pull up that dipstick it will typically have oil all over the metal because it's rubbing against lubricated parts. You really have to clean it off properly the insert and pull it out carefully. You still get some oil on the metal but it's much more obvious where the real level is.

Rob
Thanks. I agree with those saying that waiting until everything has cooled is OK. I've done the wait 3 mins vs wait over night and the change was microscopic. As for the poster asking "anybody remember the old canister oil filters ?". Yep, just happen to have an excellent example sitting in my garage. For those who purchased a second dipstick and knocked off the plastic, I'm assuming you marked low and high on it with something like a permanent marker, right? Finally, I would add if you've just done a new oil change the oil level should be at the high mark and not somewhere between the two markings.
 

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Thanks. I agree with those saying that waiting until everything has cooled is OK. I've done the wait 3 mins vs wait over night and the change was microscopic. As for the poster asking "anybody remember the old canister oil filters ?". Yep, just happen to have an excellent example sitting in my garage. For those who purchased a second dipstick and knocked off the plastic, I'm assuming you marked low and high on it with something like a permanent marker, right? Finally, I would add if you've just done a new oil change the oil level should be at the high mark and not somewhere between the two markings.
Yeah I purchased an extra then put it side by side with the old one.
 

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Thanks. I agree with those saying that waiting until everything has cooled is OK. I've done the wait 3 mins vs wait over night and the change was microscopic. As for the poster asking "anybody remember the old canister oil filters ?". Yep, just happen to have an excellent example sitting in my garage. For those who purchased a second dipstick and knocked off the plastic, I'm assuming you marked low and high on it with something like a permanent marker, right? Finally, I would add if you've just done a new oil change the oil level should be at the high mark and not somewhere between the two markings.
I believe that the folks who have done this have made a permanent mark, such as a scribe mark, deep scratch, or a notch on the side. I'm not sure the marker ink will last.
 
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