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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2017 CR-V that failed emissions inspection because the OBD2 was not ready. Usual causes are a recent CEL or battery has been disconnected--neither of which applies to my case. Technicians have not been able to determine the cause, and the problem persists, despite repeating the drive cycle several times. Anyone ever see this before? Any suggestions?
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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11,792 Posts
Possibly a loose battery connection, especially if the battery was ever replaced.
Check for corrosion and tightness. SEARCH “twist test”.
 

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2007 CRV AWD
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Instead of just OBDII not ready, should find out what readiness monitors are not getting set.
Then figure out why those are not . Whether there is a stored DTC code?
Or some sort of system fault??
 

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2018 CRV Touring AWD
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Just thinking out loud -- Can you unplug the OBD2 port and then plug it back in, sort of a reset ? Seems like a lot of electronics like being reset -- Good luck.
 

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2003 Honda CRV EX 2.4l AT
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Instead of just OBDII not ready, should find out what readiness monitors are not getting set.
Then figure out why those are not . Whether there is a stored DTC code?
Or some sort of system fault??
+1

find out which readiness monitor is not set.

access service manual information, it will tell you what drive criteria needs to occur for the readiness test to activate. the criteria are different for each monitor. Follow the instructions.

Here is an example of what is needed in a 2003 Honda Element. Obviously your car will be different :

Font Parallel Screenshot Document Number
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
+1

find out which readiness monitor is not set.

access service manual information, it will tell you what drive criteria needs to occur for the readiness test to activate. the criteria are different for each monitor. Follow the instructions.

Here is an example of what is needed in a 2003 Honda Element. Obviously your car will be different :

View attachment 150558
The car has now been with a Honda dealer for a week, and they cannot figure it out either.
 

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I read somewhere that if the gas tank is low on fuel the evap sensor can send a not ready code. The tank should a least be at least 1/3 full.
 

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I read somewhere that if the gas tank is low on fuel the evap sensor can send a not ready code. The tank should a least be at least 1/3 full.
The tank can go way below the 1/3 full point, and suffer no ill, or errors. My wife seems able to do this on her 2020... LOL I have seen it at "E" (or maybe the needle disappears?) I don't remember....and 0 miles to empty.
 

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This is where I read it obd2autodoctor.com. They recommend the following:

  1. First, make sure that the MIL (Malfunction Indicator Light) is not commanded on. Having stored or even pending diagnostic trouble codes active may prevent a monitor from running to completion.
  2. Second, make sure that you have enough fuel in the car. Some monitors, for instance the EVAP monitor, may require the fuel level to be between 35% and 85% to initiate the diagnostic testing.
  3. Third, complete the so called “drive cycle”. About one week of combined city and highway driving is usually enough to allow the monitors to reach complete status. The universal OBD-II drive cycle begins with a cold start. You should have coolant temperature below 50 C/122 F, and the coolant and air temperatures within 11 degrees of one another. This condition can be achieved by letting the car to sit overnight.
  4. The ignition key must not be left ON position before the cold start. Otherwise the heated oxygen sensor diagnostic may not run.
  5. Start the engine and idle the engine in drive for two and half minutes, with the A/C and rear defroster on if equipped.
  6. Turn the A/C and rear defroster off, and speed up to 90 km/h (55 mph) under moderate, constant acceleration. Hold at a steady speed for three minutes.
  7. Slow down to 30 km/h (20 mph) without braking. Do not depress the clutch if you are running with manual transmission.
  8. Speed up back to 90-100 km/h (55-60 mph) at 3/4 throttle. Hold at a steady speed for five minutes
    • Slow down to a stop without braking.
  9. The last one may be hard to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This is where I read it obd2autodoctor.com. They recommend the following:

  1. First, make sure that the MIL (Malfunction Indicator Light) is not commanded on. Having stored or even pending diagnostic trouble codes active may prevent a monitor from running to completion.
  2. Second, make sure that you have enough fuel in the car. Some monitors, for instance the EVAP monitor, may require the fuel level to be between 35% and 85% to initiate the diagnostic testing.
  3. Third, complete the so called “drive cycle”. About one week of combined city and highway driving is usually enough to allow the monitors to reach complete status. The universal OBD-II drive cycle begins with a cold start. You should have coolant temperature below 50 C/122 F, and the coolant and air temperatures within 11 degrees of one another. This condition can be achieved by letting the car to sit overnight.
  4. The ignition key must not be left ON position before the cold start. Otherwise the heated oxygen sensor diagnostic may not run.
  5. Start the engine and idle the engine in drive for two and half minutes, with the A/C and rear defroster on if equipped.
  6. Turn the A/C and rear defroster off, and speed up to 90 km/h (55 mph) under moderate, constant acceleration. Hold at a steady speed for three minutes.
  7. Slow down to 30 km/h (20 mph) without braking. Do not depress the clutch if you are running with manual transmission.
  8. Speed up back to 90-100 km/h (55-60 mph) at 3/4 throttle. Hold at a steady speed for five minutes
    • Slow down to a stop without braking.
  9. The last one may be hard to do.
You offer a good summary of the drive cycle requirements, which had been followed several times.

Problem Solved: Thank you for all the helpful responses. I finally resolved the issue by resetting the ECM first and then putting it through the drive cycle--in case anyone has a similar problem.
 
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