Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good night everyone,
After scouring for ages on forums and doing my own repairs, I am finally posting a question of my own. Thank you everyone who has made this such a rich forum of answers and advice.

I've been troubleshooting a pretty major oil burn on my 2002 CRV for the last year. Blue smoke out exhaust, mostly at idle and horrible when taking off from a light. Going through about a quart every 800 miles. Replaced PCV valve, no oil mist in air intake. Compression tested 175 across dry and 205 across wet which leans me towards rings, but the smoking symptoms arent constant with RPM like poor rings might show. Would worn rings be worn so equally?

From what I've been reading, smoke at idle and during heavy acceleration after idle may be valve stem seals. I am prepared to dig into the valve cover to replace the seals, but I would hate to replace them and still be smoke bombing folks on the highway.

Would it be fool hardy and a waste of time to go after the valve stem seals if my compression was improved in the wet test and the rings are to blame all along?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
I don’t know but I will follow and learn.

Wow, are you going to do this yourself? Can you get the valve springs off without taking off the head? ETCG had a special Honda valve spring compressor. Actually I think he had a little tool that kind of hammered down on the spring.

I think I saw about somebody putting rope in the cylinder to keep the valve from falling through.

Those compression values sound about right don’t they? I have an RD1 so I only know my cars specs.

“Wet” test meaning you squirted oil in the cylinder?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
getting access to the stem seals can be easy if you can work out the process for aligning the chain wihtout taking the chain cover off. to me thats the one thign that decides wheterh or not u cna be bothered doing it, having to repmove the timing chain cover is a bitch and involves jacking up the engine and removing belts and engine moutns and its just a nightmare.
If you can follow the youtube viddeos of guys doing camshaft repplacements wihtout opening the timing chian cover,and you can comply wiht their process, ur laughing. If not, then your crying.
Ive dont cylinder heads wiht the rope in the cylinder trick, it realy does work well. u make sure the valves are all closed and camshafts completeyle removed, lower the piston, insert the rope then rotate the engien so the rope gets pushed up. Then use a "head on" valve spring compressor and do it slowly.
THeres a good chance its the seals so id bihgt the bulllet and start investigating that process.
 

·
Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
Joined
·
12,133 Posts
Can you get the valve springs off without taking off the head?
No experience with the K Series engines, but often valve seals/guides can easily be replaced simply by pressurizing the combustion chamber (valves closed) then replacing from the top. Not sure if camshafts need removing. (Have only done it on 80's SOHC Mitsubishi engines)

No recurring reports of sticking piston rings here on Gen2 Vs though, so perhaps you should search BobIsTheOilGuy.com to try the treatments others have attempted.

Another philosophy is to use 5w-30 oil rather than 5W-20.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don’t know but I will follow and learn.

Wow, are you going to do this yourself?

“Wet” test meaning you squirted oil in the cylinder?
Don't get me wrong, it is not going to be pleasant, but im a by the book kinda person and there is bountiful info to cross reference I have poured over to investigate before I even considered doing this job myself. With proper prep, time and tools, it sounds far more attractive than ring problems.

Yes for wet test I added 1 tbsp of oil to each cylinder after I dry tested
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
check for blow-by.
This will give an indication if rings are bad.
Does that engine has sludge build up problems?
How many miles on it?
How do you check for blow by? Run the engine with the oil cap off and feel for pressure coming out? Make sense and easy to do.

Could not the oil control ring be stuck but the other rings are ok, so may not have blowby?
 

·
Registered
1999 CRV Lx
Joined
·
719 Posts
Yes that trick( Oil cap) let's you know if there is compression leaking through the rings.
If lots or air is coming out or you can see like a bit of smoke It's an indication of blow-by .

If you have a blow-by problem remove valve cover, if everything is really dark colored and looks like varnish that's the problem. The engine oil was changed at to long intervals.

If its not having blow by problems then its more likely that the valve stem seals are bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes that trick( Oil cap) let's you know if there is compression leaking through the rings.
If lots or air is coming out or you can see like a bit of smoke It's an indication of blow-by .

If you have a blow-by problem remove valve cover, if everything is really dark colored and looks like varnish that's the problem. The engine oil was changed at to long intervals.

If its not having blow by problems then its more likely that the valve stem seals are bad.
Welp, I opened up the oil cap while running (can't believe I never did that) and I discovered a secondary exhaust system I never knew that I had. Not very excited. Could blow by also be from valves not closing properly?

Car only has 111000 mi on it, definitely a bit brown in there from the oil cap but I have not noticed sludge
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
Welp, I opened up the oil cap while running (can't believe I never did that) and I discovered a secondary exhaust system I never knew that I had. Not very excited. Could blow by also be from valves not closing properly?

Car only has 111000 mi on it, definitely a bit brown in there from the oil cap but I have not noticed sludge
So that’s about 177k km—really not much. The problem is highway km’s are so much better than short tripping that it’s not really a good gage. For example somebody might say I only drive 5k km/year and not change their oil for two years. Or somebody might drive a lot of highway and change their oil at 5k and three months. Unless you have the service history you just don’t know.

if your valves weren’t sealing properly they would “leak” into the exhaust or intake manifolds, not the cranks case. I suppose if you have leaky valve guides/caps they may have blow by into the crankcase. I don’t really know. I’ll go try the cap off experiment myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
if your valves weren’t sealing properly they would “leak” into the exhaust or intake manifolds, not the cranks case. I suppose if you have leaky valve guides/caps they may have blow by into the crankcase. I don’t really know. I’ll go try the cap off experiment myself.
Good point, ill focus my attention on rings. After checking up on my pcv system, I'll start trying some piston ring solutions. Seafoam, hear my prayer....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
Good luck with the seafoam. My uneducated opinion is that there is likely scoring that is allowing oil to pass through and no unsticking of rings will fix that. That is just an uneducated opinion however it doesn’t hurt to try. Seafoam and MMO are pretty cheap. It’s more likely to disolve the gunk around the oil seals that are keeping them from leaking…
 

·
Registered
1999 CRV Lx
Joined
·
719 Posts
If you are about to use Sea foam or MMO it needs to rest overnight and you need to add enough to cover piston top.

You need to remove that liquid before trying to start the engine again or you run the risk of hyrdolicking the engine. Idk if you could bend a connecting rod by just cranking the engine. Better to not try to find out.

So leave spark plugs out, disable fuel pump and crank the engine to remove the liquid..

BTW stay away from the SP holes it will shoot that SF or MMO while turning. Cover the valve cover with an old clean towel or rag to prevent splashing all that stuff under the hood or all around engine bay. And to keep dirt from going in.
Keep in mind that doing this once might not be enough.
It would help if you had a bore scope camera. To see if there is scoring of the piston walls. But even if it looks good it could have enough wear that the rings don't seal, OR that there might be some hard deposits or sludge behind the pistons oil rings, keeping them from sealing.

Gl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
sorry i wanted to step in before but i just refrained. there is no blowby test where you open the oil cap. this is not a thing,.
Every car ive ever owned blew shit out the cap like nothing in this world. the crank case is a steamy misty gas fest and when you open the oil cap, all of it is able to vent in and out of the open oil cap. a perfectly sealed combustion chamber will still look like its pissing out exhaust fumes out the oil cap. You need to be a real experienced expert to identify if it is evidence of a ring failure.
Dont run don the wrong path unless ur certain.
A compression test is the correct approach, nothing else, and your 175 psi dry is great.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top