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Since we are told that turbo engines exacerbate oil dilution in GDI engines, is there any way we can minimize this problem by reducing the amount of time our engines are utilizing the turbo? Do driving habits matter?

When is the turbo activated? When we depress the gas quickly?

According to specs, the maximum torque is achieved at 2000 RPMs. Is the turbo working at those RPMs?

Also, what is a better driving practice? To go very easy on the gas in order to not flood the engine with fuel? Or is it better to go heavy on the gas, so all the fuel is consumed? Or does the computer make sure everything is controlled? Perhaps driving in ECO helps minimize fuel dilution?
 

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Turbocharger is always engaged.

Gentle driving habits trump foot-on-the-gas technique everywhere except Nascar -:)

I'm not an expert but I think turbo engines may be more susceptible to oil dilution than naturally aspirated engines. The turbocharger rotates at extremely high rpm, in the neighborhood of 100,000 revs per minute. This requires a thin oil (0W-20 spec'd), which in this engine is shared by both the engine and the turbo. Less viscous oil is more prone to oil dilution because of the way it layers the cylinder walls and interacts with the gasoline direct injection charge.

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The turbo will be spinning from the exhaust as long as the engine is running and will (and should) have lubrication even if at low rpm's even if it is not generating boost. So I don't think any of the things you are thinking of will do anything. I don't believe it is really a problem anyway, it's just that direct injections seem to cause more fuel by-pass. Things get past rings in ANY car— combustion gasses, carbon, other contaminants and fuel to some extent. That's what makes oil dirty until it needs to be changed. Have you ever taken the oil pan off a car and seen some sludge and discoloration? Filters help with the solids. Detergent additives keep the rest in suspension until it is changed. Gases used to go out a vent but now are recycled back into combustion. Fuel eventually burns off when the car has run hot for a period of time. It's how it works.

The Honda Turbo unit is a marvel. Torque doesn't just peak at 2000 rpm, the turbo it extends it, perhaps to the red-line. That's an unheard of torque curve and why Honda gets so much power out of such a tiny engine.
 

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The turbo will be spinning from the exhaust as long as the engine is running and will (and should) have lubrication even if at low rpm's even if it is not generating boost. So I don't think any of the things you are thinking of will do anything. I don't believe it is really a problem anyway, it's just that direct injections seem to cause more fuel by-pass. Things get past rings in ANY car— combustion gasses, carbon, other contaminants and fuel to some extent. That's what makes oil dirty until it needs to be changed. Have you ever taken the oil pan off a car and seen some sludge and discoloration? Filters help with the solids. Detergent additives keep the rest in suspension until it is changed. Gases used to go out a vent but now are recycled back into combustion. Fuel eventually burns off when the car has run hot for a period of time. It's how it works.

The Honda Turbo unit is a marvel. Torque doesn't just peak at 2000 rpm, the turbo it extends it, perhaps to the red-line. That's an unheard of torque curve and why Honda gets so much power out of such a tiny engine.
TGDI engines are prone to fuel dilution for two reasons, imho: 1) combustion chamber pressure are higher because of the turbocharger and 2) to eliminate the possibility of low speed pre ignition (LSPI) fuel mixtures are richened under any circumstances where LSPI could occur. With the new generation of SN Plus oils OEMs may be able to dial back on 2) though Honda has shown no inclination to do so yet.

All the same, you will be hard-pressed to find any reports of fuel dilution woes for Ford’s equivalent 1.5 TGDI engine while they’re all over the place with Hondas. Something’s up.
 

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Dans15,

Makes sense. I'm not about to draw any conclusions about Honda or any other car's issues or who's got it right and who doesn't by the frequency or tone of posts on any user forums though. For my own part, I've noticed some oil dilution on my own car but it is temporary and never beyond the top fill line. Let's see what Honda does. We know they're working on something.
 

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Folks, the turbo is *not* always engaged. When boost is not necessary, it's an unneeded exhaust restriction. When boost is not called for, the "wastegate" will divert the exhaust past the turbine. (The wastegate actuator is that electrical unit bolted to the turbo.) Some exhaust might dribble through, but not enough to generate boost.
 

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The turbo will be spinning from the exhaust as long as the engine is running and will (and should) have lubrication even if at low rpm's even if it is not generating boost. So I don't think any of the things you are thinking of will do anything. I don't believe it is really a problem anyway, it's just that direct injections seem to cause more fuel by-pass. Things get past rings in ANY car— combustion gasses, carbon, other contaminants and fuel to some extent. That's what makes oil dirty until it needs to be changed. Have you ever taken the oil pan off a car and seen some sludge and discoloration? Filters help with the solids. Detergent additives keep the rest in suspension until it is changed. Gases used to go out a vent but now are recycled back into combustion. Fuel eventually burns off when the car has run hot for a period of time. It's how it works.

The Honda Turbo unit is a marvel. Torque doesn't just peak at 2000 rpm, the turbo it extends it, perhaps to the red-line. That's an unheard of torque curve and why Honda gets so much power out of such a tiny engine.
I think you claimed yourself to be a car mechanic in some other threads. While I don't necessarily disagree that a GDI design is more prone of putting gas into the oil than a non GDI design is because I'm not an expert in that area, I have to ask you to clarify 2 things you stated above. One is the "So I don't think any of the things you are thinking of will do anything" statement. If we drive easy and don't invoke the turbo's boost, and in turn don't increase the compression pressure, then won't it make sense that less gas will escape the compressed cylinder versus a boosted and compressed cylinder (low pressure vs. high pressure)? The other statement is "Fuel eventually burns off when the car has run hot for a period of time". I have the gas dilution issue. Recently I went on a 240 miles long freeway drive at speed of 75/80 mph. That didn't burn off any gas in my oil and my oil level was still elevated after that drive.
 

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Folks, the turbo is *not* always engaged. When boost is not necessary, it's an unneeded exhaust restriction. When boost is not called for, the "wastegate" will divert the exhaust past the turbine. (The wastegate actuator is that electrical unit bolted to the turbo.) Some exhaust might dribble through, but not enough to generate boost.

Nooooo....
 

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Folks, the turbo is *not* always engaged. When boost is not necessary, it's an unneeded exhaust restriction. When boost is not called for, the "wastegate" will divert the exhaust past the turbine. (The wastegate actuator is that electrical unit bolted to the turbo.) Some exhaust might dribble through, but not enough to generate boost.
Not correct...at all.

Boost is what makes a little 1.5 liter engine feel like its much stronger.

Suggest you read this to learn the actual purpose of a turbo wastegate.

https://www.bankspower.com/tech_article/how-a-turbo-wastegate-works/

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My two cents...
As you start your car, a rich air/fuel mixture is required for combustion. However, some of that extra fuel makes its way into the oil, and dilutes or removes the oil that is protecting your engine. With a cold engine, oil doesn't flow as easily which is why you should get the engine warmed up as quickly as possible. Change the oil more often if that is the case or use synthetics like Amsoil may help in this regards.
 

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Regarding the turbo used in this engine... Honda has stated that it spins up into boost at ~1600 rpm and will continue to provide essentially a flat torque curve (which is all that matters when mated to a CVT) from 2000 rpm through 5000 rpm. This, and it's sibling 2.0T represent the first actual engines designed by Honda that are in fact optimized for use with CVTs. The 2.4 normally asperated engine on the other hand.. has to really rev up to provide the same torque levels provided by the 1.5T, whereas the 1.5T is essentially sitting in a very relaxed rpm range except under the most demanding input on the throttle.

As for yet another side thread about OD... this discussion needs to move to the main thread for OD... and can we please stop making new threads about OD? It just forces the mods to close them and redirect the discussion to the actual consolidated OD thread.
 

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My two cents...
As you start your car, a rich air/fuel mixture is required for combustion. However, some of that extra fuel makes its way into the oil, and dilutes or removes the oil that is protecting your engine. With a cold engine, oil doesn't flow as easily which is why you should get the engine warmed up as quickly as possible. Change the oil more often if that is the case or use synthetics like Amsoil may help in this regards.
Do NOT underestimate the fuel purging efficiency of this engine. It is quite refined in design and seems more then up to the task.. as long as the engine is warm and operating normally.

Also.. there are no dino oil 0w20s on the market... They are all synthetics.. and Amsoil is no better then any of the others on the market. I will grant however that Amsoil has a cult following.
 

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Do NOT underestimate the fuel purging efficiency of this engine. It is quite refined in design and seems more then up to the task.. as long as the engine is warm and operating normally.

Also.. there are no dino oil 0w20s on the market... They are all synthetics.. and Amsoil is no better then any of the others on the market. I will grant however that Amsoil has a cult following.
When I opened the oil cap, there was a strong smell of unburned gas in the crankcase. Not too promising.
Amsoil was proven to have the best friction protection over the other major name brands.
 

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When I opened the oil cap, there was a strong smell of unburned gas in the crankcase. Not too promising.
Please take this discussion over to the actual Oil Dilution thread. [The moderators want all discussion about OD to be kept in one thread]. Though all this nonsense about smell of the oil has been discussed and refuted ad nauseum already over there. https://www.crvownersclub.com/threa...tters-_-volume-1.195127/page-123#post-1583854

You CAN NOT objectively use smell as any sort of assessment as to the quality of the oil in your engine. Well, I guess you can, but it is subjective and meaningless. Same goes for the color or clarity of your oil.

If you observe oil rise on the dipstick, that is an objective measure, because you can measure it and record it over time.

If you send your oil to have it professionally tested, that is an objective measure.

Amsoil was proven to have the best friction protection over the other major name brands.

According to Amsoil. ;)

Note: we have had Amsoil shills here in the forum in the past ... and in some cases, they refuse to stop hawking Amsoil.. and got banned for it. I'm not saying this is you.. I am just encouraging you to not get going on an Amsoil bandwagon. :)
 

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Please continue in master thread closing
 
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