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For the 03 I just bought, I just did a oil service and put the factory 5w-20 in there. Once I finally pried open the glove box I found oil change receipts from the old owner that showed 5w-30 at Jiffy lube. I figured Jiffy would suck at those things, but since it's close to oil weight, I shouldn't expect any problems right? I know with older vehicles, old timers would increase the viscosity weight a bit to prevent seepage in higher mileage cars.
 

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When you have some time, here’s an interesting read.

 
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If you download the 2003 CRV manual from the Honda Website in Japan, you will find they recommend anything from 0w20 to 10w30 and 5w40 depending on climate and personal preference. They don't have the government incentives to force owners to only use low viscosity oils in Japan as they do in the US.
 

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Surely by now Honda knows 0W30 and 0W40 are readily available and preferable.
 

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that was a lot of info. I'll experiment with this crv once I run out of the 5w-20. Might be awhile since it's only a work commuter and I bought 3 jugs :)
Now that cooler/cold weather is here, I’m staying with the lighter weight for a bit.
 

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I live in Northern California. For my old 2002 (which is the same generation CRV) both the dealers and the local oil change services always put 5W-30 in the engine.

Unlike todays CRVS.. where the specified oils are more limited, in the older gen CRVs... the owners manual actually listed a fairly wide range of oils that could be used.

As engine design continues to advance though.. more and more manufacturers are being much more limited and specific in what oils they specify, AND specifically design for use of lower viscosity oils. And as noted above, some of this is for EPA compliance and non-US owners manuals still specify more oil variants as acceptable. One of the benefits of a forum like this one is we have members from all over the world, and all years and variants of CRVs... so we get the benefit of more then just what US owners manuals tell us.
 

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Everything in Moderation
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some guys run 0w instead of 5w a lot,
Old-school thinkers believed that the less difference between the W number and the hot viscosity number, the better. Had to do with the longevity of the viscosity improvement additives.

In the older gen CRVs... the owners manual actually listed a fairly wide range of oils that could be used.
Look at this oil use guide from Mobil (1926 ) that I saw in an antique store the other day! ?

136372
 

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The 0W/5W/10W is the oil's low temperature pumpability rating. It has nothing to do with the viscosity of the oil at its operating temperature. Oil at operating temperature flows like water which is what the engine wants. At room temp and lower all oils are too thick for proper lubrication of the engine. However synthetics have allowed engineering oils so that they flow better at low temperatures than in the olden days. So yes a 0W30 oil is better than a 10W30 for lubrication but also more expensive.
 

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Everything in Moderation
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What abut the 1926 Duesenberg? How come it's not on that chart?
Perhaps Duesenberg recommended another brand besides Mobil. :rolleyes:

Or, maybe the wealthy Duesenberg owners were not expected to change their own oil. ?

(There IS a disclaimer that says "If your car is not listed here, see the complete Mobiloil Chart at your dealer's.")
 

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We just emptied our several local AutoZone stores, all synthetic Rotella Gas Truck in flavors of 0W-20,5W-20,5W-30 at $2/Qt and ran register receipts in batches of $30 (that means 15 Quarts). Then used $7/off/$30 coupon and paid $23 plus sales tax. Repeated that until we had enough for Shell online Rebate for $40/per person/per address. Submitted 3 times with family addresses.

We use these on all our late model Hondas
 

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probably 0w30 and 0w40 were not commonly available back in 2003
I thought the OP said he just bought his '03, not 16-17 years ago, and just did an oil change.?‍♂ He probably understands now, after reading the Motor Oil Basics article and after using the 3 jugs of 5W20 he already bought, that 0W20 will be perfectly fine to use the next time he buys oil. I'm also presuming if after others have read Motor Oil Basics they will understand that the lowest 1st number is preferable and that 0WXX have been readily available for a while now.......maybe not 17 years ago, but for a while now.
 

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For the 03 I just bought, I just did a oil service and put the factory 5w-20 in there. Once I finally pried open the glove box I found oil change receipts from the old owner that showed 5w-30 at Jiffy lube. I figured Jiffy would suck at those things, but since it's close to oil weight, I shouldn't expect any problems right? I know with older vehicles, old timers would increase the viscosity weight a bit to prevent seepage in higher mileage cars.
I had an 02 Civic. Used 5w-20. When it was out of warranty I took it to a private garage for an oil change. Had about 105k miles on it.
The garage owner/mechanic put 5w-30 in it and I asked why? He said the heavier oil was better for the engines in the high mileage cars. I've known this guy awhile so I knew he wouldn't steer me wrong. So that's what I used. Long story short, when I had to sell the car in 2017 due to frame rust and other issues it had 250k miles on it and ran great while STILL getting fantastic mpg and according to the mechanic (a different one, the first guy retired) he estimated the motor was good for another 50-60k miles. Hope this helps.
 

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Dang some bad info in here. Please do at least 5 minutes of actual fact reading before posting. One guy in particular was horrible.

Basic explaination:

First number is for thickness/ viscosity of cold oil, second is for when the oil is hot. Its.more technical but simply put

0 weight oil is for better gas mileage that's it. And its MINOR. But it's also only available as synthetic oil, which forces the use of synthetic and that is for good reason. Conventional plugs up modern engines if you try to do long intervals between oil changes. Biggest issues are with any turbo (if equiped) and more importantly and commonly, timing chain systems. Ports are so tiny a grand of sand sized piece of carbon sludge can starve a critical part of oil.

Now 0w20 is also best if you live in cold northern climates. Less strain on engine parts when cold

20 vs 30 weight is not something to care about, has 0 effect for a daily driver. Now if you live where its 80F in the winter and 120F in the summer, you could run 10w30 and hurt nothing. If you live where it drops below freezing for winter, 5w30 on small engines, if you frequently deal with below 0F (roughly -20C or colder) when 0w20 during the winter at least is a very good idea.

Engine advancements have made clearances inside an engine much smaller which is why the thinner oils.

Synthetic is best no matter what any grumpy old guy tries to tell you. It doesnt make a mess inside an engine when going over 3k for oil changes, handles high and low temperature climates far better, lubricates, binds and cleans better than any conventional. Which is why everything is going synthetic not just automobiles. Because it's better at every aspect of lubricating parts especially in less than ideal conditions


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