Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Please be kind, and thanks to anyone in advance for your patience for AGAIN answering another question about towing, and YES I have read through as much as I can through the forum;). The amount of information was excellent -- I'm actually overwhelmed and even more confuse... sigh. So with great trepidation I'm going to brave any positive or semi-negative comments and ask again...

I am hoping to buy a popup trailer next year. This is what I've found out (please feel free to correct anything I'm mis-informed about :)

  • Trailer Dry Weight (plus a/c, fridge, stove, extra stabilizer jack, etc) appx weight = 968 lb
  • Passengers + Dog appx = 355 lb (probably need to go on a diet here!)
Subtotal weight of trailer + people = 1,323 lbs
  • Optional:spare tire, deck, awning = 55 lb
Subtotal weight of trailer + people + Optionals = 1,378 lbs

So am I correct that:
GVWR (1,500) - 1,378 lb = 122 lbs available for misc camping stuff (clothes, food, junks)???

Did I calculate correctly? Even if I don't get the optional items, I would have 177 lbs available for items I haven't even included like food, clothing, items etc. Let's round it to 200 lbs.

Is that how the weight is kind of calculate? The reason I ask is I notice everyone talks about the trailer weight, but no one discussed including the weight of passengers and the cargo weight in the towing vehicle. I read about "oh I pull a 1,300 lbs boat" or "my jet ski, atvs and bicycle was about 1,240" or "I'm only going 5 miles down the road" sort of comments.

I don't know if 200 lbs would be enough for clothing, food and misc stuff that for some reason we need to bring outdoors (but I can only admire the deers, and the trees so much before missing my iPad & books :p).

So what do y'all think ... is it doable or should I give up my dream to have a popup camper? (BTW... I had given up on getting a camping trailer because I waited so long to have Baby Blue (yeah, I give her a name :rolleyes: ) and was resign to the fact she can only pull 1,500 lbs, but now the possibility is there but I don't want to damage my car. :confused:

What I know: towing weight 1,500 lb, tongue weight (10% or 150 lbs), Class III hitch (suggested Curt brand), electric brake, and practice and drive safely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
Please be kind, and thanks to anyone in advance for your patience for AGAIN answering another question about towing, and YES I have read through as much as I can through the forum;). The amount of information was excellent -- I'm actually overwhelmed and even more confuse... sigh. So with great trepidation I'm going to brave any positive or semi-negative comments and ask again...

I am hoping to buy a popup trailer next year. This is what I've found out (please feel free to correct anything I'm mis-informed about :)

  • Trailer Dry Weight (plus a/c, fridge, stove, extra stabilizer jack, etc) appx weight = 968 lb
  • Passengers + Dog appx = 355 lb (probably need to go on a diet here!)
Subtotal weight of trailer + people = 1,323 lbs
  • Optional:spare tire, deck, awning = 55 lb
Subtotal weight of trailer + people + Optionals = 1,378 lbs

So am I correct that:
GVWR (1,500) - 1,378 lb = 122 lbs available for misc camping stuff (clothes, food, junks)???

Did I calculate correctly? Even if I don't get the optional items, I would have 177 lbs available for items I haven't even included like food, clothing, items etc. Let's round it to 200 lbs.

Is that how the weight is kind of calculate? The reason I ask is I notice everyone talks about the trailer weight, but no one discussed including the weight of passengers and the cargo weight in the towing vehicle. I read about "oh I pull a 1,300 lbs boat" or "my jet ski, atvs and bicycle was about 1,240" or "I'm only going 5 miles down the road" sort of comments.

I don't know if 200 lbs would be enough for clothing, food and misc stuff that for some reason we need to bring outdoors (but I can only admire the deers, and the trees so much before missing my iPad & books :p).

So what do y'all think ... is it doable or should I give up my dream to have a popup camper? (BTW... I had given up on getting a camping trailer because I waited so long to have Baby Blue (yeah, I give her a name :rolleyes: ) and was resign to the fact she can only pull 1,500 lbs, but now the possibility is there but I don't want to damage my car. :confused:

What I know: towing weight 1,500 lb, tongue weight (10% or 150 lbs), Class III hitch (suggested Curt brand), electric brake, and practice and drive safely.
Your thinking is a little faulty. Why do you add the weight of the passengers to the trailer? They do not ride there. Here are some numbers:

4,560 lbs. GVWR Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
2,310 lbs. front GAWR Front Gross Axle Weight Rating
2,290 lbs. rear GAWR Rear Gross Axle Weight Rating
385 lbs. payload Payload
1,500 lbs. towing capacity Max Trailer Weight
6,060 lbs. GCWR Maximum GCWR

The bottom line is to never exceed any of those figures.

You will notice if you load the front + rear axles to the max you will exceed the GVWR by 40 pounds so 40 pounds must be removed from either axle or any combination equal to 40 pounds from both.

Notice also you can have a 385 lbs. payload. This is what they figure you can put in the back in addition to the 5 average passengers. However that being a general rule if you want to figure precisely subtract the curb weight (which is different depending on trim level) in your case a 2WD EX is 3,413 pounds from the GVWR of 4,560 which leaves you 1,147 pounds you can load in the CR-V distributed evenly enough so as not to exceed the front or rear axle limits. Now your gas tank can hold about 15 gallons and gas weighs about 6 pounds a gallon so subtract 90 pounds from the 1,147 which leaves you 1,057. Subtract what you say the actual passenger and dog weight is of 355 pounds from 1,057 you now have 702 pounds you can add inside the CR-V again providing you do not exceed the front or rear axle limits.

Now since you wish to pull a trailer subract the tongue weight of 150 pounds from the 702 pounds which leaves 552 pounds you can put in the CR-V with your 355 pounds of passengers again providing you do not exceed the front or rear axle limits. If you do this to the max the GVW will be equal to the GVWR of 4,560 pounds.

The 1,500 pound trailer will already have 150 pounds on the CR-V so the trailer axle will have 1,350 pounds on it's axle.

Your trailer weighs 968 plus 55 options equal 1,023 pounds total so as long as the axle is rated for at least 1,350 you can add another 327 pounds of stuff to the trailer.

As long as you distribute the weight so as not to exceed any of the axle weights you will be at the max GCWR of 6,060 lbs. (Gross combination weight rating - the total weight of the loaded towing vehicle and the loaded trailer.)

Got it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
What Gravy so eloquently said,+1
Also a couple of tips. You may want to buy extended side view mirrors if you are not used to trailers, especially small short tonged trailers. "Trailering best practices" state that to have the trailer not fish tail you need to get 10% of it's weight (or better) on the tongue, so you would need about 100lb on it. You can get a little screw driven jack that will lift the tongue up onto the ball at any trailer place if you don't have it already. It will have a wheel on it to allow you to move the trailer without the CRV. A bathroom scale can be used to help you verify that the weight is correct, (put the scale on the ground and place a proper length of 2X4 between it and the tongue and you can re-balance as required by fixing additional gear for or aft inside the trailer. They are usually balanced from the factory so just be careful where you put additional gear. You should not require electric brakes on that weight of trailer, unless you will be in the mountains all the time. The 4 discs on the CRV are very competent. Be careful to adjust the trailers hitch to fit the ball, not too tight (gouges the ball) not too loose (you hear it bonking over every bump) and grease the ball. Fasten the safety chains they are there for a reason. Crossing them under the tongue works best.
Enjoy your pop-up trailer, and never apologize for wanting to increase your ability to safely operate your vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
GRAVY:

So, let me sum up what you are saying:
Inside the car -- I can stuff 550 lbs worth ( which I won't even if I can)
Inside the trailer (there some emoty spaces available) -- I can add 300 lbs worth of stuff (which I won't even if I can... After all the purpose is to get away not PACK it away :)

Is this correct?

BTW I did collect all those numbers and figures, it was just getting so garbled.

If I did understNd you correctly, I'm so psyched!! And THANKS SO MUCH for taking the time out to help me understand. I'm very grateful!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
FIXER:

thanks also for agreeing with GRAVY. Did I sum it correctly? I think I'll go with your idea and hold off on the electric brakes. Once I do get the trailer and drive a few times on some flat land and see how that goes.

When I get comfortable then I would like to do some mountainous/hilly roads.

I'll check into extending or adding? Side mirrors.

I feel better and now just got get the money for the Quicksilver trailer ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
GRAVY:

So, let me sum up what you are saying:
Inside the car -- I can stuff 550 lbs worth ( which I won't even if I can)
Inside the trailer (there some emoty spaces available) -- I can add 300 lbs worth of stuff (which I won't even if I can... After all the purpose is to get away not PACK it away :)

Is this correct?

BTW I did collect all those numbers and figures, it was just getting so garbled.

If I did understNd you correctly, I'm so psyched!! And THANKS SO MUCH for taking the time out to help me understand. I'm very grateful!
Yes that is correct except I made a mistake with the trailer. I used the maximum axle weight of 1,350 you are allowed to have with a 1,500 trailer but neglected to include the 150 that is supported by the towing vehicle when figuring that you can put 300 in the trailer. Add the 150 to the 300 you can actually have 450 additional in the trailer to be safe, legal, and protect the warranty. Since you state you do not expect to even put in the 300 I first figured you will be well within the limits for the trailer. All of Fixers advise is good so you only need to pay attention to the tongue weight at least 100 without adding anything up to 150 better err on the upper end as you don't want to have too little. For the vehicle if you keep it under 300 pounds of additional stuff you should not have to be concered with having it loaded too much toward the front or rear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
Two other things I would like to add for you consideration since it is not often discussed.

Check with your insurance agent to make sure you are covered properly. Most personal auto policies cover a trailer for liability while hitched to the towing vehicle but some do not. It is not covered when it is not attached so you may want to discuss that and maybe add the coverage. Also check on comprehensive and collision with respect to the trailer when hitched or unhitched as you probably need to add that too if you want to be covered.

Be careful with the vehicle registrations especially if you intend to travel out of your home state. You have to consider the weights and make sure they are covered since some jurisdictions may interpret it as overweight for the registration if not done properly. Basicly if the CR-V registration says something like Passenger or Station Wagon without a weight you are OK but if it states a weight or up to a weight make sure it is 6,000 pounds if the trailer registration does not show a weight. If the trailer registration shows 1,500 pounds you should be OK if the vehicle registration shows no weight, or if it shows a weight of at least 4,500 or at least up to 4,500 but to be absolutely sure you do not get harassed out of your state it would be best to have the towing vehicle registered for the combined weight of 6,000 pounds.
It is rare to have an issue with this in this type of vehicle combination but better to know about the possibility.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top