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Discussion Starter #1
My 2018 CR-V has 700 miles on it so no issues, but want to be prepared... I've searched this forum, YouTube, and Honda videos without finding an answer.

In the event of a dead car battery, how do I open the rear hatch, say, to get my jumper cables from the spare tire compartment?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the link (new to forum, can't quote your link). Lots of things changed with Gen 5 so I don't know if that procedure still works. I searched again in the User Guide without success. I'll try to download the Owner's Manual and search there

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Don't forget new owners can also order the paper version for free from Honda.
 

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Rocky - There is no viable solution in the thread you linked to. It most certainly would not work on my '07. For folks not physically able to climb around inside a car and be acrobats, anyway. Even if there is nothing packed in there, as there would be on a road trip. So, no. The solution mentioned there is not a workable one. Which is unacceptable. Such a situation would be comically ridiculous in my case especially, since that's where I keep not only my jumper cables, but also my tool kit and other emergency and breakdown supplies. I think this leaves Honda legally liable for death or detriment to any Honda driver who is killed or who dies due to being unable to access things kept in that part of the vehicle. The cargo area is where almost everyone keeps such emergency and survival items as fire extinguishers, water, food, blankets, tools, triangles or flares, jumper cables or box, inclement weather gear, etc. There isn't really anywhere else in a CR-V to put most of those things.


By the way, there is nothing in my owner's manual or the factory service manual (that I can find) that gives an emergency procedure to open the tailgate when there is no power. Nor have I found a solution in the intergalactic webinatorial reference data searchamatical engine.

I think I will do some research and see if I can come up with either an alternate way to power the latch or a secret emergency cable release or something. It could be a lifesaver in a bizarre situation. At the very least Honda should have provided a key lock. It might be possible to retrofit one. Heck. For that matter, it should be an NHTSA Federal requirement that a backup method be provided, since it could easily mean the difference between life and death for someone. Just sayin.' There are probably a lot of vehicles out there with the same problem.


I had a 6th grade teacher who died in the desert when his small sports car broke down. It only took them 4 days to find him, but he had neglected to have any extra water with him. This was in the early '60s, before cell phones or interstate highways. It was very sad. He was young, too - under 30. Such a situation would only be made worse if you had water but could not get to it.


Of course, you could say this is pretty far out there on the edge of extreme paranoia, and you wouldn't necessarily be wrong. But I will say this: As a retired truck driver who, over my lifetime, have been in many bizarre, unlikely, unusual stranding situations, and have helped other folks out of same, I can say that many times those situations were severely exacerbated by the fact that I (or the person I stopped to aid) lacked just one minor simple thing that would have either gotten me out of it, or saved me, or made the whole event much less serious. Like a screwdriver, or a pair of pliers, or a jug of water, or … there have been many different things. Which is why I do carry as much stuff as I do, because I learned the hard way. People look at what I carry and laugh, but - as we all know, he who laughs last, laughs best. And you have to be alive and happy to laugh.
 

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I think you forgot that you can access the trunk, and all your stuff, by simply walking around the car to the back seat and pulling the release. The seats will obediently flop to a flat load floor, and then you can access things nearly as well as you can from the rear hatch. Personally, I keep my jump box in the glove box, I wouldn't have to mess with the rear hatch at all if I lost juice.

And if you are burying your fire extinguisher in the back cargo area, it's in the wrong place.
 

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It is true that I don't keep the fire extinguisher in the cargo area, but my jump box is more than twice the size of my glove box, so yeah, it goes only in the cargo area. I can access some stuff loaded in the back by way of folding down the back seat, but not the spare tire well. I have a Weathertech cargo mat, and I simply cannot get to the spare tire well with that in place from the back seat. It can only be accessed from the rear, with the hatch open.
 

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As far as I know it's only mandated on the Trunks of cars. You cannot get trapped in the back of an SUV but it would be nice to be able to have some kind of mechanical release in case the battery was to die.

Rob
 

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My 2018 CR-V has 700 miles on it so no issues, but want to be prepared... I've searched this forum, YouTube, and Honda videos without finding an answer.
In the event of a dead car battery, how do I open the rear hatch, say, to get my jumper cables from the spare tire compartment?
so funny... :doh:i had put my jumper cables in spare tire compartment also...then when i saw a commercial last week for an battery jumper pack by Halo, it hit me - the same concern you have. On Wednesday took the jumper cables out and stored in my rear cargo storage carrier i was given - i keep ice scraper, rags, and flashlight there too.
 

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Let me get this straight:
- You are concerned about "acrobatics" for trunk access, but you want to install a release that, by necessity, will be on the back panel of the hatch, probably near the base.
- You are concerned about fire extinguisher access, even though you don't keep yours there, because that's a terrible place for a fire extinguisher
- You apparently can't get to the spare tire hatch after flopping down the back seat because a mat's on top of it. (An aftermarket mat.)

I'm pretty sure that if you are stuck in the desert, you'd find a way to lift the lightweight spare tire well cover long before you died of dehydration. I know those weathertech mats are tough, but they aren't that tough; don't they bend? It's hardly a bolted-on sheet of armor over your trunk carpet.

I'm pretty sure Honda's lawyers aren't staying awake at night with dark dreams about their liability exposure.

P.S. Also, may I suggest one of the new compact lithium jump packs, they are superior in every way to the bulky lead-acid one you are still using. They are smaller, lighter, last longer between top-up charges, and most will even charge your cell phone.
 

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P.S. Also, may I suggest one of the new compact lithium jump packs, they are superior in every way to the bulky lead-acid one you are still using. They are smaller, lighter, last longer between top-up charges, and most will even charge your cell phone.
And my Costco one fits nicely under rear seat on drivers side........:Happy:
 

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After recent problems with my since replaced battery, I started keeping my jumper cables under the rear seat. I can't fold it perfectly flat with them under there but I seldom need to do that.
 

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After recent problems with my since replaced battery, I started keeping my jumper cables under the rear seat. I can't fold it perfectly flat with them under there but I seldom need to do that.
Going to ask a dumb question bc I'm missing something. Don't you have to unbolt the rear seats to get underneath them? Or am I doing it wrong?

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Going to ask a dumb question bc I'm missing something. Don't you have to unbolt the rear seats to get underneath them? Or am I doing it wrong?
There is a void under the rear cushions to allow the seats to fold flat. It may be about 4 inches high and runs the entire length of the rear seat. Take a look.
 

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There is a void under the rear cushions to allow the seats to fold flat. It may be about 4 inches high and runs the entire length of the rear seat. Take a look.
Yeah... space that used to be occupied by fuel tank. I think I'd rather have the load floor tilt up a little bit and have 3-4 more gallons in the tank if Honda asked me, which they didn't...
 

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Yeah... space that used to be occupied by fuel tank. I think I'd rather have the load floor tilt up a little bit and have 3-4 more gallons in the tank if Honda asked me, which they didn't...
I knew one of the old/long timers would bring up that sore subject. Which is a valid point.
 

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Yeah... space that used to be occupied by fuel tank. I think I'd rather have the load floor tilt up a little bit and have 3-4 more gallons in the tank if Honda asked me, which they didn't...
Well, it also seemed to me that he 4th Gen didn't have easy fold down rear seats???? Didn't they need a two step something or other where the seat bottom had to fold up before the seat back could fold down? Or is my memory going? I only owned the 2014 CRV for a year.
 

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Well, it also seemed to me that he 4th Gen didn't have easy fold down rear seats???? Didn't they need a two step something or other where the seat bottom had to fold up before the seat back could fold down? Or is my memory going? I only owned the 2014 CRV for a year.
That was it; now I remember... It had a flat load floor, but having to flip up the seat-back decreased the length of the floor in the flat configuration. This new design enabled them to advertise a sizable improvement in seat-down cargo area (both length and total usable volume) without having to significantly increase the size of the vehicle.
 

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On P. 649 of the 2018 Owners Manual there's a procedure for opening the tailgate without power. You pry off a cover on the inside of the tailgate with a flat screwdriver to access a lever.
 
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