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Ah, the dreaded P1399 and misfire codes...I've been reading a lot about this on the forum. Here's our issue. It's a 2000 Honda CRV and is throwing the 1399 code as well as other misfire codes. Depending on when I read the code, it is either just 301, or sometimes it's 301, 302, and 303, plus the random/multiple misfire code. I have not had the valves adjusted since buying the car 6 years ago because it wasn't something I was aware of. I've found a mechanic who says he can do the valve adjustment for 75 bucks. Is this worth doing? It has 190,000 miles on it and I'm hoping I can squeak out a few more months on the car. So far, I've done the spark plugs, the distributor cap and rotor, working on the ignition coil, but can't get it out because of a stripped screw, and a new fuel filter.
 

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$75 is a reasonable price for getting the valve lash adj and I would do it without question.
When you get it done, ask the mechanic to tell you which ones were way out of adj. It is usually the exhaust ones as the lash gets less because the valve seats start receding. If the lash adj is almost nil, then you can get valve seat burning and valve burning.
That may even take care of the misfire codes you are getting.
When you do that, ask the mechanic to remove that troublesome screw on the ignition coil and either replace that screw or make it so that you can remove it later, if need be. Should be pretty easy for him.

At night or in a very dark room, mist some water over the spark plug wires while the engine is running (beware of exhaust fumes) and see if you get a light show with a lot of arcing. If so, it is time to replace the spark plug wires.
ALSO, if you are not using the recommended NGK or Denso spark plugs, that may be causing misfires. ie:Champion, any BOSCH, AutoLite, etc.
The low cost NGK v-power plugs seem to do the best on the 2000 CRV. (NGK 4291 ZFR6F-11 V-Power Plug).
They are around $2.50/plug on the Internet with free shipping. (always check shipping prices :eek: )

Buffalo4
 

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My 2000 has something like 225,600 miles on it and is running good right now.

I did have misfire issues and mine was the bearings in the distributor worn out.
 

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I've seen many discussions on this topic over the years and it amazes me how sensitive the Honda engines appear to be to the proper spark plug model. Have you tried it with the work you've done so far even with the old coil? Also, I agree that the valve adjustment is a good idea regardless as the exhaust valves in these engines have a tendency to recede into the head over time and that decreases the gap to the point the valve may not close completely. That could affect compression which cause misfire, but also burning of the valves and seats (expensive).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I do have the recommended NGK spark plugs in. I ran a compression test with not so promising results. Dry they were 60, 120, 140, 140, and wet 70, 240?, 200, 200. What is the next step? Do I still get my valves adjusted first?
 

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take the head off and and see how bad it is. valve for sure measure cylinders while your at it. Then decide from there. Good luck
 

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If you're not planning to remove the head, I would sure get the valve adjustment done, ASAP.
It could be that one valve in the low cylinder is not closing all the way and causing the low compression.
Pretty easy to check yourself if you have some feeler gauges. Lots of good vid and writeups on how to adj them.
Have the mechanic adj the valves. $75 is not much much money when talking about cars.
The mechanic may even check out that cylinder with a scope while he is doing it. If he sees a burnt valve or valve seat and still adjs the valves, it will probably still last quite a few miles.
If you want to keep it longer, then have the head taken off and repaired.
Buffalo4
 

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IMO, $75 is a lot for what it entails. Probably take him less than half an hour start to finish. Really pretty simple. Get a repair manual and read for yourself. Without looking at it my guess would be that you would just need a feeler gauge, a screwdriver, and a 10mm box wrench. Almost reminds me of the $100 that the dealer wanted to charge me to change the oil in the rear diff. Told him it was no more difficult than changing oil. He just looked at me and told me everything was "menu priced".

In regards to spark plugs, use what is recommended in your owners manual.
 

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I would guess by the time he got to the CRV, got the proper tools (including the socket and extension for turning the crank bolt) removed the valve cover, etc, adj the valve lash, probably rechecked it,reinstalled what he took off, put away his tools and started it up to check it, $75 is a very reasonable price.
I've done it on a 2000 crv and it was pretty easy, overall.
Still, I think $75 is a very reasonable price.

Buffalo4
 

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I would guess by the time he got to the CRV, got the proper tools (including the socket and extension for turning the crank bolt) removed the valve cover, etc, adj the valve lash, probably rechecked it,reinstalled what he took off, put away his tools and started it up to check it, $75 is a very reasonable price.
I've done it on a 2000 crv and it was pretty easy, overall.
Still, I think $75 is a very reasonable price.

Buffalo4
I guess I look at things differently. I would rather buy the tool and have it for the next project if I don't already have it. Eventually your tool collection will pay for itself. I fix everything myself. Whether it be my vehicles or any repair on the house. And I'm very picky about having it done right, which is another reason why I do everything myself. I have a hard time trusting others, especially if they are being paid. It is all about the money, not whether it is done right or not, a majority of the time.

A feeler gauge is probably going to be the least used tool when it comes to projects that is required for this job. But they are dirt cheap.
 

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Do you already have the proper sized socket (pretty big) and the proper length extension and breaker bar or 1/2" ratchet to turn that crank bolt?
If so, fine. If not, it is fairly expensive.
Me, if I had a place to work instead of a parking lot, I would do it myself also.
I like DIY stuff.
But you implying that $75 is way too much, overall, is very misleading, IMO
Buffalo4
 

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It is IMO for what it is. Removing the valve cover, finding TDC, loosening a nut, adjusting a screw with the feeler gauge in place. And then tightening the nut. Rotating crank and doing next valve, until your done. Then replacing valve cover. You have your opinion and I have mine. I have done it before on other vehicles, and I'm sure it is similar on a CR-V. If people knew how easy some of the stuff that they pay people to do they would shake their head. My first valve adjustment job I did in high school, if that is any indication as to how easy it is.

Here is how I look at it. If you don't have the tools and your interested in learning to do stuff yourself, look at buying the tools as being what you would pay someone to do it. Then next time you will have the tools to do it yourself, and the repair will be free except for some time and a valve cover gasket. Nothing is that difficult if you have the right tools and some patience. I would dare to say that the OP could buy the necessary tools to do it himself for less than $75 if he didn't already have them. And have the tools for another repair later on. May not even be his current vehicle. They may not be Snap On, but they will work. And if he doesn't have a place to of his own to work, I'm sure he knows someone that does. My first timing belt job years ago, I had to go to my parents house, and bring my tools with me.

And if your asking me if I have the necessary tools, the answer would be yes. I have been buying tools all my life and have a fair amount, not just automotive. My wife tells me I have too many, but doesn't complain when she needs her car repaired, or something around the house repaired or replaced.

Factory manuals make it super easy, as they tell you step by step how to do stuff. Along with all the necessary tools. A Chilton or Haynes will work too, but takes some reading to decipher what applies to your model. If your not into doing stuff yourself then pay someone to do it. I just won't do it, doesn't matter what it is.
 

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DIY Guy,
I wholeheartedly agree on doing stuff like this yourself and I do most of the work on my Ody myself.
I only have a parking lot to work in and that makes it tougher, as I have no garages to 'borrow' , overall.
Some,not real mechanically inclined, have had some problems while adj the valve lash themselves.
Some had to do it several times to get it right while others had turned the crank backwards , etc.
So, yes, if you can do it yourself and want to , so much the better.
Buffalo4
 

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I could look at this situation either way... One the one hand, it sounds like the OP did a compression test, so a valve adjustment seems well within the grasp. OTOH, you're already in a stressful situation and if things don't improve you could end up second-guessing yourself to death. And on the one hand, if I could spare the $75 knowing that the outcome might not be resolved (but a good chance that it might) it would be worth having done and knowing it was done correctly, while on the other possibly using that $75 for any related repairs that could be needed. Honestly, it would depend on my wallet and my stress level. Working on a car at your convenience is a lot different than dealing with a possible calamity (at least for me). But one way or another that valve adjustment should be on your list.
 
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