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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 98 Crv and it has alloy rims. I can either get it powdercoated from my dads friend for a somewhat resonable price or i can take the cheap way out and spray paint them. Will spray paint stick to Alloy? I want my rims to be flat black or gloss black. What should i do?
 

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would spray paint stick to the alloy if money is really a problem?
You can take the cheap way out and risk a result that you may not be happy with. Or wait till you have the money and get them do professionally.


It it was me.....i would wait. I have seen some decent spray bomb jobs....but you have to make sure you prep them properly. (I wont even pretend to know where to start with the prep).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
well i would clean them with rubbing alcohol and maybe even carb cleaner. I have spray painted more than enough bike rims but that is aluminum and does not have that metallic look of the alloy. The metallic alloy base is all that i am worried about.
 

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Cleaning and painting alloy wheels

well i would clean them with rubbing alcohol and maybe even carb cleaner. I have spray painted more than enough bike rims but that is aluminum and does not have that metallic look of the alloy. The metallic alloy base is all that i am worried about.
Rubbing alcohol should be the last step using virgin white paper towels. If there is any oil or some solvents that leave traces behind, the paint may not stick well if at all.

Spray painting aluminum is tricky. If the paint contains a basic metal in the pigment such as titanium dioxide or whatever for instance, if the aluminum is on the wrong side of the galvanic scale of the metal, the aluminum will sacrifice itself (Look up galvanic action). The least noble metal will corrode in other words and the paint will flake off in due time. That could be less than a year or ten years depending in the metal combination. I think that is how it works.

Some stainless steels for instance are more stable than aluminum so the aluminum will corrode around the SS. It will actually expand or grow and is often seen around SS bolts in aluminum.

As previously mentioned if you go down to the bare aluminum, it should be etched with a compatible etch for maximum adhesion.

If it were me I would use some medium flat two part epoxy paint. I actually have some industrial epoxy made by Steelcote. It will stand up to the rough use on a wheel of sand and grit rolling around on the surface. This epoxy has just enough flex so it does not crack and peel. It actually sticks like glue on steel. Steelcote adds an additive called Add-alume (or something like that) to the epoxy so it will stick to aluminum better.

They just happened to have a batch made for aircraft gages and there was some left over. So I sweet talked them into selling me some. The minimum buy used to be one quart. They normally sell like enough paint to do a bridge! So you probably will not be able to buy any unless you combine it with a few gallons of concrete floor paint. Unless there is a distributor near you, then a quart might be available.

http://steelcoteinc.com/index.htm

This stuff is terrific! I first bought it when I was restoring a Corvair in the late 70’s.

-RG
 

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Rubbing alcohol should be the last step using virgin white paper towels. If there is any oil or some solvents that leave traces behind, the paint may not stick well if at all.

Spray painting aluminum is tricky. If the paint contains a basic metal in the pigment such as titanium dioxide or whatever for instance, if the aluminum is on the wrong side of the galvanic scale of the metal, the aluminum will sacrifice itself (Look up galvanic action). The least noble metal will corrode in other words and the paint will flake off in due time. That could be less than a year or ten years depending in the metal combination. I think that is how it works.

Some stainless steels for instance are more stable than aluminum so the aluminum will corrode around the SS. It will actually expand or grow and is often seen around SS bolts in aluminum.

As previously mentioned if you go down to the bare aluminum, it should be etched with a compatible etch for maximum adhesion.

If it were me I would use some medium flat two part epoxy paint. I actually have some industrial epoxy made by Steelcote. It will stand up to the rough use on a wheel of sand and grit rolling around on the surface. This epoxy has just enough flex so it does not crack and peel. It actually sticks like glue on steel. Steelcote adds an additive called Add-alume (or something like that) to the epoxy so it will stick to aluminum better.

They just happened to have a batch made for aircraft gages and there was some left over. So I sweet talked them into selling me some. The minimum buy used to be one quart. They normally sell like enough paint to do a bridge! So you probably will not be able to buy any unless you combine it with a few gallons of concrete floor paint. Unless there is a distributor near you, then a quart might be available.

http://steelcoteinc.com/index.htm

This stuff is terrific! I first bought it when I was restoring a Corvair in the late 70’s.

-RG
RG, you are one well read dude;). Thanks for all your insights.
 
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