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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, living up here in the snow belt, I removed the plastic undercarriage covers so that I can Fluid Film the undercarriage on my newly aquired 2013 CRV. This is usually a once a year task if you want to prevent rot. The underside was in good shape to begin with, for an eight year old car. Much better than Ford and Chevy pickups if they never got rust prevention. I know that these underpanels are installed by the designers primarily for aerodynamics for better fuel mileage but also figure that it can't hurt in keeping down the salty road splash in the winter, so maybe that's why the car"s in pretty good shape. When I went to clean these plastic panels, as they were pretty filthy from 8 years of road grime, I was surprised to find those white padded inserts that are found in other parts of the car, like part of the inside of the fuse panel lid. I'm guessing these things are for sound deadening or maybe insulation, but I can't understand why they would put them on the underside of these plastic panels, because they only act as sponges attracting water. They are taking a long time to dry out before I install them back on the car and I'm just wondering if I should just remove them from the panels or coat them with something like FlexSeal after they dry? I always hate to deviate from what the manufacturer intended and they haven't seemed to do damage to the underside before, except for some surface rust, so what's anyone's opinion?
Stephen
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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Couldn't hurt to remove IMO. Hopefully they won't create fluttering noises at speed...

Are they an open cell or closed cell insert? A closed cell pad would not absorb water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's an analogy I was going to use, but I don't think they are foam. If it was, it would be open cell because after hosing them off, like I said, they retain water like a sponge. I did think if I could obtain sheets of closed cell foam, I could use the old white ones as templates and replace them. They were complaining about similar material in other posts on 5Th generation CRV's. Someone also said it's used on some Toyotas. It just doesn't make sense why they use a material in the undercarriage to promote moisture. If it's for sound deadning, closed cell foam sounds better.
St
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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They are taking a long time to dry out before I install them back on the car and I'm just wondering if I should just remove them from the panels or coat them with something like FlexSeal after they dry? I always hate to deviate from what the manufacturer intended and they haven't seemed to do damage to the underside before, except for some surface rust, so what's anyone's opinion?
Stephen
This is Honda we are talking about and they NEVER put anything on a vehicle that does not serve an actual purpose. They are obsessive about costs and so if they spend even a nickel to add something to a Honda vehicle.. there is a sound reason for it (in this case, it could literally be for cabin sound managemet).

So, that brings us to what are the white padded inserts? My guess is these are for sound baffling to deaden coupling of road noise. They also could be structural too in that it provides some additional mass and support for the plastic panels.

If you think about it, what would you expect if the plastic panels are stripped of the foam pieces? I would expect the plastic to flutter at some road speeds, and couple more noise into the cabin, maybe even create an nasty resonance at a particular speed or road condition.

My suggestion is to dry them out well and reinstall everything the way you found it. (y)
 

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I have found on the Miatas and such that the belly covers are instrumental in directing the cooling air flow, in the grill, across the engine and out the back. With it removed, much ground turbulence and a much dirtier engine results, but I never saw a temperature rise.
 
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