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Discussion Starter #1
Hey All-

So I brought my 2004 CRV down to an auto parts store for a diagnostic after getting a "Check Engine" light. The diagnostic returned a P2A00 and a P1457 error code. According to the readout, the P2A00 indicates that the car is running lean (Full Disclosure: I had previously had issues with a P0134 error message and swapped out the O2 sensor for a fix). The readout also states that the P1457 code indicates a system leak in the EVAP system (canister area). I've never dealt with this issue before and the dealership wants around $800 to fix it. Frankly, I need to keep this car for about 4-5 more months and don't feel like putting that much money into it. But, if this is something I can fix on my own, or if it should be done for a more reasonable price, I'm willing to commit a few hundred to make sure the car runs until I can get rid of it.

Does anyone have any experience with this and can give me some advice as to how to go about dealing with it? I very much appreciate any guidance.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I forgot to mention that I already tried a replacement gas cap, but the error message returned anyways.
 

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I don't know the CR-V well enough to give you hard specifics, but this is what I know from working on my past cars.

Evaporative emissions: There is a small pump built into the canister assembly. Approximately 5 hours after you park the car at night, the pump runs to pressurize a part of the system, and then a leakdown test thru a small orifice is done to see if the system can hold pressure. If there are other leaks in the system, you will likely fail this test and throw a code.

So, you replaced the gas cap. Make sure the seal in your new cap is smooth, and check the filler neck face where that gasket seats. It's possible that a gas nozzle smashed into the opening could scratch it and prevent a good seal.

If you are so inclined, it's time to go under the car and look for cracked rubber tubing, or cracks in the canister assembly. You might have to remove a cover to check. The clamped ends of the hoses are where leaks often occur. Follow the filler neck down to where it enters the gas tank itself and look for issues.

Beyond the visual checks, you'll need a pump and gauge set to learn more. It could be at the canister, the gas tank, the purge valve on the intake manifold, the lines to and from the engine, etc. And that's why dealerships charge so much for diagnosis and fixing this.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Fibber-

Thank you very much for the informative reply. I didn't realize that the issue was as involved as it seems to be. Considering the dealership initially wanted $750 to replace my O2 sensor, which took me all of 5 minutes to swap on my own and about $100 for the part, I'm extremely wary of what they tell me when it comes to repair costs. If I'm understanding what you're saying, it seems like I might have no other choice.

Given what you know about this issue, do you think it's something that I need to address right now? As I said before, I need the car to last me until mid-June, at which point I plan on dumping it for whatever I can get for it. My concern, as it is my wife who drives it, is safety. I don't want her driving it if there is some sort of safety risk involved with a leak of this kind.

Thanks again for your help!
 

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The p1457 shouldn't cause any issues if you can't fix it right away or just don't want to before you get rid of it.
 

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Agree. In most cases Evap Emissions won't impact driveability, but you likely won't pass inspection that way. But beware that a real fuel system pressurization fail could indicate a bigger issue, like a fuel filler pipe leak. You wouldn't want the CR-V parked in your garage, for instance, if there really was an issue. Unlikely.... But the test is sensing a problem somewhere.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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As stated, the P1457 is an evap system leak.

This is a nice explanation and how-to for troubleshooting:



Don't be discouraged by the first part of the vid...he goes on to explain how to test the valve's operation even if you don't have one of those fancy diagnostic systems...

I've resolved a couple of evap codes by finding loose/split hoses on Civics and CR-Vs of that vintage. And, our '99 Acura needed a valve at about 120K miles.


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Regards the lean condition: Was your replacement O2 sensor a wide-band Denso unit? Others do not measure the A/F ratio accurately enough for the Honda electronic controls.
 
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