Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings, new member here, with a question about my 2008 EX.

The Power Steering Oil Cooler tube on my car has rusted in the Hawaii salt air, and is seeping PS fluid. This cooler tube is a simple loop positioned in front of the radiator down low. The center part of the loop is visible through the bumper cover, and that's the part that's dripping.

Just wondering if anyone has replaced this part, and could comment on the difficulty. I searched the web without success...but it appears that it might be accessed by removal of the bumper cover...

The part is readily available for around $80 -- P/N 53765-SWA-000.

Thanks for any info!

Stan
Kailua Kona HI
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
My repair

Local Honda dealer here on Big Island of Hawaii wanted about $400 ($200 for part, $200 for installation). OEM part online is about $140 ($100 for part, $40 for shipping -- my estimate above was optimistic). So here is what I did today:

1. Picked up a universal PS Oil Cooler from local O'Reilly store, Hayden #9001. This part is recommended for use on this vehicle. Kit includes PS cooler, (4) ft of 11/32" rubber PS hose, (4) SS hose clamps, (2) mounting pads, and (2) zip ties. Cost about $25.

2. Picked up a couple 12 oz bottles of Honda PS fluid.

3. Parked car with front tires on two pieces of vinyl flooring to ease turning the wheels while stationary. Did not jack up the car.

4. Removed front bumper cover assembly:

- Under front edge, remove (4) cylindrical "pop-up" fasteners (get these off by prying up the center pin about 1/8 inch, then the outer part slips right out).
- Under each front corner, remove (1) 10 mm bolt.
- Under each wheel well, remove (2) Phillips screws, and one pop-up right above the top screw. (May need to turn wheels left and right for easy access.)
- On top, remove (7) pop-ups, lift off radiator cover.
- Peel back the soft plastic edge trim on the front edge of each wheel well, back to the seam between the bumper cover and the fender. (Trim is attached with double sided tape.)
- At the front of each wheel well, pull out and away to release the right and left sides of the assembly.
- At the center of the bumper cover assembly, lift up and forward to release the center of the assembly. (The grill is attached and should come off with the bumper cover.) Set the cover assembly aside.

5. Now have easy access to the existing PS cooler. The tubing connections are at the right side of the car. There are several options. One is to replace the cooler with the same OEM part. This would require removing the hose connections, allowing fluid to drain, unbolting the center bracket and the right side bracket, disconnecting a plastic slip on each side, and reversing the procedure to install the new part.

6. I elected to install the Hayden cooler. Installation of the Hayden part requires connecting the new cooler with the supplied rubber PS hose, which must be connected to the existing hoses with metal hose connectors. I decided to use the remaining good portions of the original cooler tube as the connecting pipe. (The pipe was corroded and leaking only in the center, the sides are like new.) I cut the existing cooler tubes at the right front corner, just before they make the bend to head back to the hose connections. I used a mini-tubing cutter to get a clean cut with no filings. Drained about 10 oz of fluid into a container.

7. Hayden recommends mounting the cooler directly to the A/C condenser by piercing the cooling array with the two zip ties. I was not comfortable with messing up the fins on the A/C condenser, and access to the back side of the condenser is difficult (to attach the zip-tie connecting disk). Instead, I mounted the new cooler to the center mounting bracket for the old cooler. (This required a little preparation: cutting and removing the old tubing, removing the rubber gaskets that protected the tubing, unrolling the tubing channels to make a large flat surface, drilling one extra 3/16 inch hole to accept a zip tie, cleaning off the rust and painting with a rust-proofing paint.)

8. I temporarily mounted the center bracket on the car, determined the desired mounting position for the new cooler, and measured the length of each of the two rubber hoses. (Allowed about 3/4 inch connection to each metal part.)

9. Cut the two hose pieces to length, connect first to the old tubes. (These are .400 inch OD tubes, and a tight fit on the supplied 11/32 inch ID hose. Put a little clean PS fluid on the tubes to push on more easily.)

10. Put all four hose clamps on the hoses, loose for now. Again with a little PS fluid as lubricant, attached the two hoses to the new cooler. Position and tighten all four hose clamps. (Did not over-tighten, just enough to make the outside of the clamp about even with the hose diameter.)

11. Removed the center bracket from the car. Using the two zip ties with disks, mounted the new cooler to the center bracket. This required threading each zip tie through the cooler fins, through the foam mounting pad, through a hole in the bracket, and finally through the disk. Snugged up the disk against the back of the bracket. Mounted the center bracket back on the car and tightened the existing bolt.

12. Things were lined up pretty good and stable at this point. In my case, I added a regular zip tie to hold the two hoses together near the right front corner of the A/C cooler. There is at least one inch clearance from the hoses to any metal corners that might cause damage.

13. Added new PS fluid to the reservoir to the top line. Started the engine and ran for 10 seconds to suck in the new fluid. Added fluid again. Repeated two or three times until the fluid level did not drop with the engine running. In my case, one 12 oz bottle was needed to refill the system. Bled the air from the PS system by turning the wheel back and forth 10 or 12 times, until there were no bubbles in the reservoir. (You may want to read up on bleeding the system -- it should be easy to turn the wheels, either by jacking the car or by placing low-friction material under the tires. Also, do not force the steering against the right/left stops for more than a second or two.)

14. Let the engine idle for a while, checked for leaks and noises.

15. Replaced the bumper cover assembly, reversing procedure above. (It may be necessary to re-tape the soft plastic trim strip. I used 3M 03609 Molding Tape.)

This repair required about four hours (I'm a slow back yard mechanic), and leaves open the option of replacing with an OEM part in the future. I chose to try this solution because it was much less expensive, and the OEM part seemed destined to fail again anyway. The new cooler is mounted a little higher and better protected from road debris and water. It is made of aluminum instead of painted steel so less likely to rust. Finally, the Hayden is a true cooling device, not just a piece of tubing.

We will see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,722 Posts
Pretty impressive posting to me.
Welcome to the forum and I hope you find it a good place to get info and THANKS for sharing the above.
I am very surprised that nobody responded to your initial post. That is very unusual in this forum.

Buffalo4
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
Only thing that could improve this posting is pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
The aluminum will get eaten up by the salt air too, but the fix should outlast the rest of the vehicle at this point. I live by the beach in Florida and the salt air eats up outdoor light fixtures, musical instruments and anything else you leave outside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
hi, very good thread, all crv's with this "cooler" fitted must suffer this at some point, i am no exception and have just had the bumper off to make a temporary repair to the rusted pipe using self amalgamating tape and fuel pipe clips, i am not keen on spending £138 for a piece of steel pipe with a u bend in it, has anybody successfully made up, or had made up their own, cant understand the cost for a piece of ( rusting already i bet) steal pipe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,696 Posts
It looks like a nicely done optional method, saving money and filing the bill for functionality. I would take a different approach, but that's just me.

Seems to me that stainless tubing would be the best option here. It's what I would do. Stainless steel brake lines can be bought at a parts store in straight sticks. I restore Quincy air compressors as a side thing, among others, so I have a lot of experience with tube bending, though mostly with copper. But I have also done stainless brake lines. You want seamless tubing, too. I haven't gotten any in a few years but it used to be readily available and should still be, as it is still used for many things. If an auto parts store can't get it for you, try a Parker fittings dealer - they carry it for use in hydraulic systems - same stuff. I use wooden bending jigs that are easily made with dowels or bolts and a board and make the bending fairly straightforward. You can probably find YouTube videos on it. That line does have a lot of bends in it, but it's not an impossible task, just takes some patience and care. Work from one end to the other. And the tubing is cheap, so if you screw one up, just make another one. IIRC I paid about $15 for a ten foot stick last time at an auto parts store. It would still be cheap at twice the price compared to the OEM part. Use the old one for your template, making sure you don't bend it while removing.

My '07 came from California, and still looks as new, so I will likely never have this issue. Hopefully.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top