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Discussion Starter #1
Gen 2 CRVS are more capable than so many want to admit.

14+ inches of heavy snow on top of 1" of sleet/ice.

50% Tread cooper Discoverer AT3s.

CRV 9 points, mother nature 0, and local police threw in the towel even with newer full size SUVs.

First pushed out of 12" out of my slight up hill incline driveway. Then we spent 35minutes getting our Odyssey out into the road (on the road which plows had made a couple passes already, the Odyssey was playing hell moving around).

After that seeing as the plows had pushed all that snow right up next to where the van was parked, used my V to push most of it back and mow it down to manageable depth.

Finally at 1130 PM a younger women coming home from work posted on FB city page needing help in town accross the river. They had to bring the plows in and put a full tow ban into effect. Her car was buried in the mide of the road like several others due to ice base over deep snow. I went across the river to go help.

Police wouldnt even get close and gave me the 3rd degree at first about coming out. Chilled out when realized I was set up for it and I was only going to try to get the car free if it wasnt too risky, but mainly to get them home safe because they were outside of town exposed to the full force of the storm. They wouldnt even go down the road to the car with their fancy Ford explorers. Made them walk (I asked him to move so I could at least drive down close so they didnt have to hike out, but wouldnt, made them walk all the way back to us).

He then asked about road conditions from my.house to there and asked me to go straight home after dropping them off. I was a smart ass and asked "what's going to happen when you get stuck, lol, I'll be at home". Lightened their moods for the night which was cool.

Also my father got his 4runner stuck by mistake and he has some insane mudding tires on the thing (forgot that low range was required for lockouts to engage) so went to help him. He got out but **** himself when I made his long uphill driveway look easy with nothing more than his narrow ruts to follow.

Gotta say tires do kinda make the vehicle lol.

Have the New Discoverer at3 4s on the way for this now. Cooper just makes damn good tires that are not all marketing fluff, they do the job as good or better.


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Discussion Starter #3
Another update from dealing with this INSANE WINTER we are having.

I picked up a second job delivering pizzas because of debt incurred due to be off work longer than expected (months longer) due to shoulder injury and amount of surgery etc to repair it.

Not even the driver with full snow tires can keep up.

Few vehicles in the area can hang but they have proper tires and proper 4 wheel drive (guys that have proper tires on Jeep Wranglers). Compared to them this V and much but it makes them take a double take when I'm right behind them in several inches of snow even on steep hills (or they follow me up said hills).

I do want to investigate retrofitting the electronic controlled rear differential so I can set up manually activated 4wd if possible.


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I think we amaze a lot of others with our CR-Vs. The first time I took my '09 out in the snow (I bought it in 2016), I was surprised at how well it cut through everything--with the AWD and the traction control kicking in, it was cutting through some pretty deep stuff with no problems at all. It's been pleasantly stable in the rare bad weather we have here.

I just wish it had more power--out in Utah, I had a little panic since I barely made it past one switchback when I came out of the canyon at Canyonlands (on Shafer Canyon Rd.)--there is no room to back up and get a running start, and it really strained in 1st gear to get enough power to get moving again. I likely will get a Pilot, the 2nd gen RDX or an MDX which all have a V6 next time out. (Can't afford the new Passport for several years, but that is ideal for what I'd like to have.)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nice

Ya they are a lot better than people want to give credit for. I don't have ABS, traction or any of that. Just a plain old real-time 4wd LX.

I was shocked you have a power issue. I've pulled vehicle bigger than my CRV out of the snow with little trouble multiple times. Last thing I pulled out was a Saturn sedan (so close to the same size). A co-worker was a dumba$$ and parked on top of snow/ice pack when our thaw started, crap was 6"+ deep. His car sank down and was resting on body, tires where touching nothing. Grabbed my tow strap and pulled him up and out and about another 4 car lengths up onto the gravel no problem, no assist from his car at all because as soon as I saw him close the door I started pulling. CRV barely gave a crap. Maybe gen 2 1st gear is lower range than gen 3????

Of course after that I had to play a little as there was a basically a pond sized puddle in the middle of ice/snow pack.

Sadly no more fun in the snow. However I have learned of some class b roads not too far from me. Hoping to see what they are all about as police with their fancy SUVs hate the roads, avoid them during the winter time lol.

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Tigris - My best friend swears by Coopers and has for many years - they are all he runs. I've never owned any. Is your car an automatic? I wonder if a manual wouldn't be the best at this stuff. It's what I'd want. Of course, no such issues here, though we do get ice in winter, snow is rare.

I'd definitely be interested in hearing about that business of changing the diff over to manual activation.
 

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I was shocked you have a power issue. I've pulled vehicle bigger than my CRV out of the snow with little trouble multiple times.
I haven't had a chance to try much in really heavy snow, as it is rare these days that we see any large snowfalls here. The largest my '09 has seen was maybe 8" or so, about a month after I bought it in 2016. I would say a rare 10-12" snowfall would only happen every 3-4 years, with 4-5" being more normal as our largest snowfall.

The only time I ever got stuck in my '97 CR-V (in the 20+ years we've owned it) was when we had one of those 12" storms. I cut the bottom of the driveway a little close and the front tire went over the street curb. So what I ended up with was having the curb between the front and back wheels, no traction, and packed snow front and back. It took some digging to get it out. Otherwise, though, it usually cut through anything I drove it through.

The 3D view is somewhat distorted, but this is what I had to deal with coming out of the canyon

canyonlands-switchbacks.jpg

It was one of those switchbacks that was on enough of an incline that I barely kept moving and way too sharp to get a running start. These switchbacks are tight enough that it often takes a full turn of the steering wheel to maneuver, and in places there is room for only one vehicle at a time on the road. The only vehicles I saw were either larger SUVs (with a V6 or V8) or Jeeps running in low gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Kloker

Ya mine is an automatic. Manual trans are rare these days, at least ones people want to part with.

Wildcat, the big thing isn't engine size as much as gearing. Can have all the power you could build and if gearing is too high your in trouble in those conditions. If jeeps were in low range there is your answer, just too much for standard gearing. A bigger engine isn't going to do you any good as its going to be geared accordingly. Any 4wd truck or SUV you likely saw out there all have low range gearing options. It's it's bigger than our crvs and 4wd it has low range on the transfer case.

For me, getting through where you did, I'd call that a hell of a win for a gen 3 crv. The fact it made it speaks volumes and probably turned a few heads.

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Altitude will start to make your engine struggle too. I think the figure is something like 3% power loss for every 1000 feet above sea level. So where Wildcat is running, according to the Google machine, is about 6000 feet above sea level. I've never ran anything at elevations higher than between 2-3000 feet, so I can't say what affect it would have.
 

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I'm also taking into account the torque specs of the engine. In years past, just as one example, the GMs I drove always had a lot of low-end torque (especially when you first hit the throttle), yet past maybe 3,000 RPM their engines always went flat, with hardly any acceleration. Hondas are known to have a wider torque band, with the peaks coming at higher RPMs. And @BDub also makes a good point about the altitude--I hadn't figured on that. A combination of all that and the gearing is why I struggled a little on that one switchback. (And you know, it's that slight panic attack as it's happening, as I didn't have enough gas to drive all the way around the loop for 60-70 miles and come out the other end!)

My tires are also slightly larger than stock (235s vs. 225s), so the slight additional mass robs a tiny bit of power, and larger diameter also acts against the gearing. But it's probably so slight that it's not even worth mentioning.

I've had the '09 up to the top of Pike's Peak (14,115 ft.), but other than having no guardrails for much of the trip, it's an easy drive and I had no issues. I figured if that Karmann Ghia I followed could make it to the top, I'd have no problems either. :BigGrin:

I'm sure Acura's SH-AWD is even better but I can't say that Honda's seemingly low-tech AWD system has ever let me down in routine driving. It's simple, and it just works. There's something to be said for simplicity!
 

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I'm also taking into account the torque specs of the engine. In years past, just as one example, the GMs I drove always had a lot of low-end torque (especially when you first hit the throttle), yet past maybe 3,000 RPM their engines always went flat, with hardly any acceleration. Hondas are known to have a wider torque band, with the peaks coming at higher RPMs. And @BDub also makes a good point about the altitude--I hadn't figured on that. A combination of all that and the gearing is why I struggled a little on that one switchback. (And you know, it's that slight panic attack as it's happening, as I didn't have enough gas to drive all the way around the loop for 60-70 miles and come out the other end!)

My tires are also slightly larger than stock (235s vs. 225s), so the slight additional mass robs a tiny bit of power, and larger diameter also acts against the gearing. But it's probably so slight that it's not even worth mentioning.

I've had the '09 up to the top of Pike's Peak (14,115 ft.), but other than having no guardrails for much of the trip, it's an easy drive and I had no issues. I figured if that Karmann Ghia I followed could make it to the top, I'd have no problems either. :BigGrin:

I'm sure Acura's SH-AWD is even better but I can't say that Honda's seemingly low-tech AWD system has ever let me down in routine driving. It's simple, and it just works. There's something to be said for simplicity!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Altitude will start to make your engine struggle too. I think the figure is something like 3% power loss for every 1000 feet above sea level. So where Wildcat is running, according to the Google machine, is about 6000 feet above sea level. I've never ran anything at elevations higher than between 2-3000 feet, so I can't say what affect it would have.
It's barely 1% likely not even that. 3%+ was old figure still thrown around from the days of Carburators.

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm also taking into account the torque specs of the engine. In years past, just as one example, the GMs I drove always had a lot of low-end torque (especially when you first hit the throttle), yet past maybe 3,000 RPM their engines always went flat, with hardly any acceleration. Hondas are known to have a wider torque band, with the peaks coming at higher RPMs. And @BDub also makes a good point about the altitude--I hadn't figured on that. A combination of all that and the gearing is why I struggled a little on that one switchback. (And you know, it's that slight panic attack as it's happening, as I didn't have enough gas to drive all the way around the loop for 60-70 miles and come out the other end!)

My tires are also slightly larger than stock (235s vs. 225s), so the slight additional mass robs a tiny bit of power, and larger diameter also acts against the gearing. But it's probably so slight that it's not even worth mentioning.

I've had the '09 up to the top of Pike's Peak (14,115 ft.), but other than having no guardrails for much of the trip, it's an easy drive and I had no issues. I figured if that Karmann Ghia I followed could make it to the top, I'd have no problems either.

I'm sure Acura's SH-AWD is even better but I can't say that Honda's seemingly low-tech AWD system has ever let me down in routine driving. It's simple, and it just works. There's something to be said for simplicity!
Every little bit adds up though.

If your wanting something to do more regular adventures like that, I would advise looking at something with more proper FWD. Doesn't need to be fancy, but needs low range. Best option, Toyota. Similar power band to other 4wd vehicles so lacking higher RPM but like Honda, last forever. If I lived out where I could drive places like you are, I'd have one or an older Jeep before Chrysler sold out and the went to crap like the rest of Chrysler products.

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Discussion Starter #16
Except read all of it, the claims that "acuras are suited for the changes". Modern fuel injection adapts quite well, has for probably the last 15 or so years. Prior you had to reset the ECM so it would relearn the drastic new condition change or you could see at much as 3%

6 yr old Dodge ram towing a 7*12 the loss in power was maybe 10% total over the total drive through the Rockies.

They are using that as a selling point (marketing hype using outdated information), but the numbers aren't that high anymore. 3-5% was carberated and early versions of fuel injection. Part of why they went to having mass air flow meters, more efficient way of adjusting to elevation change.

Trips from Illinois to California when I was a kid we had to stop a few times so my dad could adjust the carb on our old doge conversion van because we we're LOADED. Last family trip was in a Honda Accord (late 90s) and with 4 of us plus bags it did amazing. Finally got my dad off carbs and replaced even his Jeep with a newer fuel injected model (his first one was first gen fuel injection which still wasn't great).

Not saying at 6000 feet he wasn't loosing some power but 18% no way. Thing wouldn't be able to get out of it's own way.

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See, there we are talking about the computers ability to adjust the fuel mixture. They can absolutely adapt to the differences in useable oxygen in the air to make the engine run correctly. But, it still doesn’t mean there is no power loss. Ultimately, at higher altitudes the air density is lower and the computer takes away fuel so the mixture is correct. Less air + less fuel = less power. Now having said that, I have no idea what its like to drive at high altitudes. It may not be that noticeable in a modern vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ya I'm not saying there is no power loss. It's just a lot less of a loss than your thinking. Loss of 15% of power in say Denver, we would have a ton of CRV owners on here complaining about MPG and such.

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Aside from Pike's Peak (which is not a fast drive), I have been over plenty of mountain passes, like Wilkerson Pass, Hoosier Pass, etc., and didn't have any real issues, as there are usually switchbacks that keep the speeds low, and I'm often in second or first gear anyway (auto trans).

But there is one entrance ramp on I-70 coming out of Frisco, CO, where if I don't get enough speed on the entrance ramp (I think it's exit 201), I am stuck on the freeway doing 45 MPH, foot to the floor, and the speed staying constant or dropping slightly as everyone blows past me going 70 MPH or more, and it takes at least a half mile or more before I can finally start creeping up. This is where I wish I had a blast of nitrous oxide to give me a shove up the mountain. :D
 
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