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I was wondering what the proper technique for recovering from an understeer condition would be in and AWD CRV. I've been driving a '99 CRV for a few years now, and always stayed on the super cautious side which has kept me safe. (0 tickets, 0 crashes) I've understeered a few times, and slammed on the breaks to recover...it worked alright.

Now that it's officially winter, and I've found myself a bid bored I went out to try to regain my winter driving proficiency, and I've noticed that if I intentionally understeer and slam the gas instead of the brake, the CRV will correct it's direction of travel.

What is your technique to recover for an underster condition?

Thanks.
 

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usually, when it happens - you want to lift off the gas gently to let the front tires gain traction again and then steer to the direction you want to go and keep going. you dont want to lift off the gas suddenly as it may create more problems for you. same thing with slamming on the brakes. you could spin out when slam on the brakes. i believe that slamming on the brakes should be the absolute last option.

depending on the road condition (snow, ice, rain, etc.), it's different for each one.

the best way to avoid understeer or oversteer is to maintain your speed according to weather/road conditions so you dont get into an under/over steer. :D
 

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with the awd you got it, drive through it. I learned this the hard way in my awd aerio. at a very slow speed we just sorta went plop into a ditch at a T. it was pretty icy, so it might have ended up being a cool drift manuever if i gave it gas, but that was the first time that made me wonder and subsequently lead to ummm, experimentation, let's say....
 

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I usually unwind the wheel a little bit and lift off the throttle. I don't think the RT system has enough push on the rear wheels to driver through the understeer.

Not much you can really do if it starts to plow, it's always an indication of going to fast in bad weather...
 

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I usually unwind the wheel a little bit and lift off the throttle. I don't think the RT system has enough push on the rear wheels to driver through the understeer.

Not much you can really do if it starts to plow, it's always an indication of going to fast in bad weather...
it's not so much that the rear pushes you out of the understeer, it's more that the front pulls your front, so you don't want to unwind the wheel too much. (so i guess a lot of this is true for FWD cars as well.)
 

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What speed are you correcting for understeer? In the academy, I spent 20 hours alone fixing understeer, and it was generally (not always) needed to let of the gas with your right foot, then apply the brake slightly like a clutch with your left foot while keeping both feet on gently. Then release the gas and allow the car to slow and then point the wheel where you want to go and apply the gas to finish the turn. There are a lot of methods to fixing both under and oversteer, and unless you have to stick to the book, find a way that helps you fix it. Generally if you feel like you have lost control of the car and it is not doing what you want, the best option is to slow down, and then fix it. Do not jam on the brakes though, just gently slow it down.



 

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Serj, what you mention is very close to what I understand to be true of most rear wheel drive cars, and certainly is even valid for most drivers of FWD cars. The slight braking or throttle reduction throws the weight of the car forward (and onto the steering wheels) theoretically giving them more traction.

My experience has been that this technique (the one you describe) works great for dry pavement loss of control, but not so much with slippery stuff (namely packed snow). if you are on ice, then just forget about it and keep your tires pointed in the direction of motion just in case you hit a dry spot (reduce risk of rollover as much as possible).

FWIW, "Secrets of Solo Racing" by Henry A. Watts basically says to keep the the steering steady and either let off the throttle, or brake slightly to put the nose back down and induce a little oversteer. Like I said before, this jives with Serj and my experience on dry pavement, but not my real life experience on snow. maybe there is a rally or rallycross expert around that can shed more light on non-dry pavement driving techniques.
 

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Now that we've gotten some roads with consisten snow cover, I've been expereimenting a little (when the outside of the turn is clear and there's no cars around.. and I've left plenty of run-off outside my intended line).

I find that as most mentioned, applying the brakes gives the worst results, unless your in way too deep and are "boxed in" (a road hazard in now in your path even if you corrected). I thin pasenger cars are still set-up will lots of front brake bias to make them more stable. Neutral or rear brake bias would cause too many spin-outs with unskilled drivers.

Adding more steering input also seem to make the problem worse.

It does seem like either apppliny mroe throttle to get the rear end sliding (yaw control) or lifting the throttle seems to work best. I haven't tried applying brakes while lifting. I could see that working well. Lift, light application of brakes follow by throttle to power out or even get the rear end to come around a little. One hte rear end starts comming around ,it seesm very controllable with countersteering and a little throttle.

Yes, as everyone has said, just driving a little slower is the best method. :rolleyes: But when you have some open road to test the vehcile's behavior...and have a little fun, I think it's makes for good practice, in case you get into a situation where you find yourself taking evasive action.
 

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Serj, what you mention is very close to what I understand to be true of most rear wheel drive cars, and certainly is even valid for most drivers of FWD cars. The slight braking or throttle reduction throws the weight of the car forward (and onto the steering wheels) theoretically giving them more traction.

My experience has been that this technique (the one you describe) works great for dry pavement loss of control, but not so much with slippery stuff (namely packed snow). if you are on ice, then just forget about it and keep your tires pointed in the direction of motion just in case you hit a dry spot (reduce risk of rollover as much as possible).

FWIW, "Secrets of Solo Racing" by Henry A. Watts basically says to keep the the steering steady and either let off the throttle, or brake slightly to put the nose back down and induce a little oversteer. Like I said before, this jives with Serj and my experience on dry pavement, but not my real life experience on snow. maybe there is a rally or rallycross expert around that can shed more light on non-dry pavement driving techniques.
I think it would be useful on slippery conditions, we practiced all our driving on a closed course that had sprinklers on it to keep the road wet and even icy sometimes. Don't know how it'd hold up in snow since I only ever drove in snow twice and it was with chains.



 

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BTW, I've been trying to become a crocodile for years now and have been completely unsuccessful. I did lay an egg once, but that's as close as I ever got. Please share with me the secret you advertise in your signature.....
 
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