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I haven't been able to figure out how this feature works on my new CR V. I looked in the owners manual and read how to do the Calibration which I did. When I'm driving down the road and check my tire pressure it doesn't give me the pressure in each tire. The only thing I see are what look like blue pyramids at each wheel. On my Corvette it will give me the tire pressure on each wheel and also tell me if any of the tires are low. I just assumed the CR V would do the same thing, am I missing something ? Thanks for your comments.
 

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The sensors are external to the tire and so cannot read actual pressure. They recognize a change in diameter/shape, is my understanding. This is why calibration is required every time you change the pressure in a tire as a new reference point is then necessary. Note that the TPMS can be triggered by non-pressure related events so it's a good idea to keep a pressure gauge handy in your car so you can determine if it's a false alarm.
 

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I haven't been able to figure out how this feature works on my new CR V. I looked in the owners manual and read how to do the Calibration which I did. When I'm driving down the road and check my tire pressure it doesn't give me the pressure in each tire. The only thing I see are what look like blue pyramids at each wheel. On my Corvette it will give me the tire pressure on each wheel and also tell me if any of the tires are low. I just assumed the CR V would do the same thing, am I missing something ? Thanks for your comments.
As already noted.. there are not actual pressure sensors in the valve stems of Hondas anymore. It is now a passive system which relies on the vehicle keeping watch for the rate of spin on each wheel.

On the plus side.. unlike your vette active pressure system ... TPMS needs no periodic R&R of the sensors to continue working.

Hondas intention here is to alert an owner well before a tire loses so much pressure it is destroyed by driving... not provide data readouts on actual tire pressure.

Now.. for owners who really want to monitor actual tire pressure on each wheel.... you can find a truck ton of kits on Amazon that are active sensors you put on your valve stems and a readout unit you can put on your dash. One example: Amazon.com: Tymate Tire Pressure Monitoring System - Solar Charge, 5 Alarm Modes, Auto Backlight & Smart LCD Display, Auto Sleep Mode, with 4 External Tmps Sensor: Automotive but there are many to choose from.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The sensors are external to the tire and so cannot read actual pressure. They recognize a change in diameter/shape, is my understanding. This is why calibration is required every time you change the pressure in a tire as a new reference point is then necessary. Note that the TPMS can be triggered by non-pressure related events so it's a good idea to keep a pressure gauge handy in your car so you can determine if it's a false alarm.
Thank you for the explanation, it makes more sense to me now.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
As already noted.. there are not actual pressure sensors in the valve stems of Hondas anymore. It is now a passive system which relies on the vehicle keeping watch for the rate of spin on each wheel.

On the plus side.. unlike your vette active pressure system ... TPMS needs no periodic R&R of the sensors to continue working.

Hondas intention here is to alert an owner well before a tire loses so much pressure it is destroyed by driving... not provide data readouts on actual tire pressure.

Now.. for owners who really want to monitor actual tire pressure on each wheel.... you can find a truck ton of kits on Amazon that are active sensors you put on your valve stems and a readout unit you can put on your dash. One example: Amazon.com: Tymate Tire Pressure Monitoring System - Solar Charge, 5 Alarm Modes, Auto Backlight & Smart LCD Display, Auto Sleep Mode, with 4 External Tmps Sensor: Automotive but there are many to choose from.
Thank you for the information, the tire pressure monitoring system looks interesting. I think I will read some reviews on it and see how people like it.
 

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On this side of the pond, the feature is simply known as DWS - Deflation Warning System.

No measurement of the tyres themselves, other than when pressure sinks and needs to be re-inflated/calibrated.
 

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Thread jump, this is an official thread jump...

I had a low tire pressure alarm come on the other day. I pulled over within a few mins (where it was safe) and gave all four tires a quick visual and then I listened for that dreaded HISSSSSS. Everything looked and sounded fine but one tire looked a little low. A few mins later I had reached my destination. I broke out the pressure gauge and checked all four tires. Three of them had lost 2 pounds since the last time I had checked/adjusted air pressures. The forth tire, the one that looked a little low, was all the way down to 18 PSI! I checked for nails, slashes, and cuts. I could not see anything so I drove to the nearest gas station and set all tire pressures to where I like to keep them. And then, I did the TPMS recalibration. For the next day or two, I frequently checked the PSI of the tire that was very low. It has not lost any pressure since I refilled it. And after another visual inspection, I found no damage.

Why the TPMS take so long to alert me of a low tire pressure?
 

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Because it's an indirect system, which has far fewer hassles than those with sensors inside the tire ('direct-read'). Watch the video above your post.
 

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Passive TPMS is not great at spotting slow leaks. An aftermarket add-on with real sensors is the way to go if you want to do more than spotting a flat before it's a blowout. I have a valve-cap and dash-display based system, but there are more-elegant ones out there.
 

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Because it's an indirect system, which has far fewer hassles than those with sensors inside the tire ('direct-read'). Watch the video above your post.
Passive TPMS is not great at spotting slow leaks. An aftermarket add-on with real sensors is the way to go if you want to do more than spotting a flat before it's a blowout. I have a valve-cap and dash-display based system, but there are more-elegant ones out there.
I guess the question I should have asked is:

How often does the system take a reading?

Answer: Not often enough... I assume that there would be a noticeable difference with a 5-10 PSI difference. My low tire was 16 PSI lower than it should be at the time the system alerted me.
 

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Twice the TPMS has notified me of a tire going flat. Before I ruined the tire.

Sent from my LG-H700 using Tapatalk
 

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Nothing beats checking actual pressures every 2 weeks or so or after temperature swings. It is not usually possible to spot a low tire visually and if all tires are down 6 pounds or so, for example in the fall after temperature drops or after several months of not manually checking pressure with normal slow leakage the system won’t alarm. Only exception would be in cars with actual wheel sensors but I would still check these manually on occasion.
 

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guess each system differs, right? no direct hoses into the tire Lol. so yeah a computer guess it, I recalled where I hit a pothole, driven 10 mi, something is not right. cold wee hour 20 degree morning yeah that warm day the tire was perfect, I try not to ignore it anymore, but I pay attention to the ride, the feel, then trust a machine. but they are smarter each time they come out, never know when its right,
 
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