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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Fellow CRV Neighbors,

I am curious and need to ask a question about the oil on the dip stick. I checked the oil level and it only comes to the first line (lower line). My manual says the oil should be between the two lines (upper and lower). Hmmm, so perhaps the garage where I had the oil change just didn't fill it up all the way? Or perhaps most garages only put enough oil in to come to the first line? Can oil evaporate when the weather is hot?

Thank you for your replies!
 

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Lower mark is minimum, upper mark is maximum. If it’s at the minimum level, you need to check the level very frequently.......you do not want to go below minimum level. Maybe have the shop that changed it last add a little so the level is somewhere between the min/max marks.....or add 1/2 qt yourself and check the level.

To me, between the min/max marks is perfect.
 
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The top line is full, and the lower line indicates one quart low. If it is at the bottom line, add one quart of oil. Then check it again next time you fuel. If this report is just after a fresh oil change, I would go back, make them add a quart, and chew them out thoroughly. It means they charged you for enough oil to fill it, then shorted you a quart. From now on, make them show you a full dip stick before you pay. It's not rocket science, so they didn't make a mistake, which means they did it on purpose. Not cool.
 

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Checked my oil level this A.M. cold, as I always do. It was both un-low/un-full or un-min/un-max.......it was perfect, between the 2 marks/lines.;)(y)LOL
 
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Hello Fellow CRV Neighbors,

I am curious and need to ask a question about the oil on the dip stick. I checked the oil level and it only comes to the first line (lower line). My manual says the oil should be between the two lines (upper and lower). Hmmm, so perhaps the garage where I had the oil change just didn't fill it up all the way? Or perhaps most garages only put enough oil in to come to the first line? Can oil evaporate when the weather is hot?

Thank you for your replies!
You answered your own question. :)

"My manual says the oil should be between the two lines (upper and lower)."
 

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Hope the OP reads signatures.......especially the parts in blue letters.;)
 

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You answered your own question. :)

"My manual says the oil should be between the two lines (upper and lower)."
Is that your "Car Maintenance For Dummies" book? The idea that as long as the level is between the lines your oil level is okay is not good practice. If you want to run your car a constant quart low, that's your choice, but it's not a good idea at all, especially with these small engines. The maintenance guidelines in the factory manual are designed to be the loosest possible suggestions, and not remotely meant to be considered best practice. For instance, it also doesn't mention that the car needs to be sitting on a flat, level surface when you check your oil, or it won't be accurate. In other words, the manual contains only the barest minimum of information and not the whole, full amount of knowledge you need to be equipped with to correctly operate your car. You are expected to have a general knowledge of the process, and at least an average aptitude and some degree of common sense, which would, in my day, include parental or other training in how to do the basic things in life for most people. There were always exceptions, such as people raised by parents with no practical aptitude for such things, or cultural reasons, such as a lack of such training for girls. Nowadays it's the rule rather than the exception, for nearly everyone. The depth of practical living skills people are brought up with today are sadly and woefully lacking, as evidenced by your comment.

Luckily I happen to have some knowledge of the O.P. in this thread, as we have visited before, so I know a little history there and can put the question into context. What is context? Here are some examples: A wrench was put in my hand at an early age, and I was a competent mechanic by the time I got to high school. I spent some years racing and building cars. These days I restore old wood and metal working machines and Quincy air compressors. My two sons both have 4-bay garages. The eldest restores vintage VWs. The youngest is focused on vintage muscle cars. My nephew Jason is crew chief and head wrench on a 2,500hp drag boat.

In short, we were raised in families where the parents had, and imparted to us, more than just basic living skills. We all know how to cook, how to do plumbing, framing, electrical wiring, anything mechanical and anything practical. In those days, that was fairly common. Today it's non-existent. People don't know how to do anything. They can't cook, they have no idea how to fix anything, and they don't teach their kids anything because they themselves are functionally and practically illiterate. Heck, most college graduates can't spell! And they do not possess enough basic skills to correctly interpret even the most basic instructions in an owner's manual.

I think I can guess which category a lot of you folks fit in, based on most of your comments. A single proper, correct, and accurate answer is worth a hundred vague, generic, obviously baseless ones. This thread is a perfect illustration of that. Of course, no offense is meant to anyone. But if you don't have the good answer, try and have the consideration to refrain from confusing the issue. Just my two cents worth. I'm here to learn, too, but I will help when I can. If that has to include frequent rebuttals of bogus information, then so be it. It certainly wasn't my idea for it to be that way, but I will do what I can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thank you all for your replies. I was curious why the oil was only at the lower mark. I even thought perhaps my 2007 CRV with 123,000 might be burning some oil. But perhaps my oil change at the last garage they shorted a quart. Just wasn't sure. I will now look at the dip stick before I pay at the next oil change. Good idea!
Is that your "Car Maintenance For Dummies" book? The idea that as long as the level is between the lines your oil level is okay is not good practice. If you want to run your car a constant quart low, that's your choice, but it's not a good idea at all, especially with these small engines. The maintenance guidelines in the factory manual are designed to be the loosest possible suggestions, and not remotely meant to be considered best practice. For instance, it also doesn't mention that the car needs to be sitting on a flat, level surface when you check your oil, or it won't be accurate. In other words, the manual contains only the barest minimum of information and not the whole, full amount of knowledge you need to be equipped with to correctly operate your car. You are expected to have a general knowledge of the process, and at least an average aptitude and some degree of common sense, which would, in my day, include parental or other training in how to do the basic things in life for most people. There were always exceptions, such as people raised by parents with no practical aptitude for such things, or cultural reasons, such as a lack of such training for girls. Nowadays it's the rule rather than the exception, for nearly everyone. The depth of practical living skills people are brought up with today are sadly and woefully lacking, as evidenced by your comment.

Luckily I happen to have some knowledge of the O.P. in this thread, as we have visited before, so I know a little history there and can put the question into context. What is context? Here are some examples: A wrench was put in my hand at an early age, and I was a competent mechanic by the time I got to high school. I spent some years racing and building cars. These days I restore old wood and metal working machines and Quincy air compressors. My two sons both have 4-bay garages. The eldest restores vintage VWs. The youngest is focused on vintage muscle cars. My nephew Jason is crew chief and head wrench on a 2,500hp drag boat.

In short, we were raised in families where the parents had, and imparted to us, more than just basic living skills. We all know how to cook, how to do plumbing, framing, electrical wiring, anything mechanical and anything practical. In those days, that was fairly common. Today it's non-existent. People don't know how to do anything. They can't cook, they have no idea how to fix anything, and they don't teach their kids anything because they themselves are functionally and practically illiterate. Heck, most college graduates can't spell! And they do not possess enough basic skills to correctly interpret even the most basic instructions in an owner's manual.

I think I can guess which category a lot of you folks fit in, based on most of your comments. A single proper, correct, and accurate answer is worth a hundred vague, generic, obviously baseless ones. This thread is a perfect illustration of that. Of course, no offense is meant to anyone. But if you don't have the good answer, try and have the consideration to refrain from confusing the issue. Just my two cents worth. I'm here to learn, too, but I will help when I can. If that has to include frequent rebuttals of bogus information, then so be it. It certainly wasn't my idea for it to be that way, but I will do what I can.
Is that your "Car Maintenance For Dummies" book? The idea that as long as the level is between the lines your oil level is okay is not good practice. If you want to run your car a constant quart low, that's your choice, but it's not a good idea at all, especially with these small engines. The maintenance guidelines in the factory manual are designed to be the loosest possible suggestions, and not remotely meant to be considered best practice. For instance, it also doesn't mention that the car needs to be sitting on a flat, level surface when you check your oil, or it won't be accurate. In other words, the manual contains only the barest minimum of information and not the whole, full amount of knowledge you need to be equipped with to correctly operate your car. You are expected to have a general knowledge of the process, and at least an average aptitude and some degree of common sense, which would, in my day, include parental or other training in how to do the basic things in life for most people. There were always exceptions, such as people raised by parents with no practical aptitude for such things, or cultural reasons, such as a lack of such training for girls. Nowadays it's the rule rather than the exception, for nearly everyone. The depth of practical living skills people are brought up with today are sadly and woefully lacking, as evidenced by your comment.

Luckily I happen to have some knowledge of the O.P. in this thread, as we have visited before, so I know a little history there and can put the question into context. What is context? Here are some examples: A wrench was put in my hand at an early age, and I was a competent mechanic by the time I got to high school. I spent some years racing and building cars. These days I restore old wood and metal working machines and Quincy air compressors. My two sons both have 4-bay garages. The eldest restores vintage VWs. The youngest is focused on vintage muscle cars. My nephew Jason is crew chief and head wrench on a 2,500hp drag boat.

In short, we were raised in families where the parents had, and imparted to us, more than just basic living skills. We all know how to cook, how to do plumbing, framing, electrical wiring, anything mechanical and anything practical. In those days, that was fairly common. Today it's non-existent. People don't know how to do anything. They can't cook, they have no idea how to fix anything, and they don't teach their kids anything because they themselves are functionally and practically illiterate. Heck, most college graduates can't spell! And they do not possess enough basic skills to correctly interpret even the most basic instructions in an owner's manual.

I think I can guess which category a lot of you folks fit in, based on most of your comments. A single proper, correct, and accurate answer is worth a hundred vague, generic, obviously baseless ones. This thread is a perfect illustration of that. Of course, no offense is meant to anyone. But if you don't have the good answer, try and have the consideration to refrain from confusing the issue. Just my two cents worth. I'm here to learn, too, but I will help when I can. If that has to include frequent rebuttals of bogus information, then so be it. It certainly wasn't my idea for it to be that way, but I will do what I can.
 

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"I think I can guess which category a lot of you folks fit in, based on most of your comments. A single proper, correct, and accurate answer is worth a hundred vague, generic, obviously baseless ones. This thread is a perfect illustration of that. Of course, no offense is meant to anyone."

Nope, you're a prince. You actually make us wish verbal narcissist (Google people who dominate conversations) williamsji would return from vacation asap. Now that's something! OP - just ask Larry (PM).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I truly believe everyone here is giving their best and most helpful opinions.

And I thank each and everyone of you for your comments.
 

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I’ve never had an issue with maintaining oil level between the marks/lines. Saying doing so is not good practice is ridiculous. Not checking oil level frequently is not good practice.
 

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Nope, you're a prince. You actually make us wish verbal narcissist (Google people who dominate conversations) williamsji would return from vacation asap. Now that's something! OP - just ask Larry (PM).
It might have been better had you left this comment entirely in parentheses. I know I can't decipher it.
 

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I’ve never had an issue with maintaining oil level between the marks/lines. Saying doing so is not good practice is ridiculous. Not checking oil level frequently is not good practice.
Don't even go there. It is most certainly NOT ridiculous, it is the one and only correct answer. There is not one engine maintenance item that is or has ever been more important than to always maintain your oil level exactly at the full mark. It is absolutely the most basic thing there is, and there is no application anywhere on Earth where it is not the one and only accepted method. The circumstances of your mistaken learning may be innocent, but they are nonetheless tragic. You might repent, and seek absolution. And then make it a cheeseburger.
 

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Yea, they don't hold a lot even when full. I bought a brand new 2001 Camry 2.2L, and after the first couple services changed my own oil. It was easy, fun, even relaxing. Oil change with filter took 3.7 quarts. That's when I figured one quart low is much too low! Ever since then mine is full, or just barely below full. Check it once a week, or first thing every morning during a road trip. Peace.
 

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Yea, they don't hold a lot even when full. I bought a brand new 2001 Camry 2.2L, and after the first couple services changed my own oil. It was easy, fun, even relaxing. Oil change with filter took 3.7 quarts. That's when I figured one quart low is much too low! Ever since then mine is full, or just barely below full. Check it once a week, or first thing every morning during a road trip. Peace.
Yup. The other extreme is my F250 with a 460, which holds 7.5 quarts. It is just as necessary to keep it full and never run it low. On this engine, which has hydraulic lifters, proper oil flow is critical to valve function. On the CR-V, with it's relatively small oil system, and a lot of other modern small engines, a fairly common reason for high mileage engine failure is excessive camshaft/valvetrain wear from inadequate oil supply over a long period. Gee, I wonder what could cause that?
 

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I had my oil and filter changed by the dealership, since I was moving and my tools were unavailable, and the level was at the full mark. The next oil and filter change, which was done several days ago, I performed myself. The owner's manual, the shop manual, and an internet search all indicated that the proper amount of oil to add with a filter change is 4.2 liters. I bought a container of oil, which was labeled as containing 4.73 liters, and poured out 0.5 liter, which was measured. The remainder, 4.23 liters (close enough to 4.2 liters), was poured in the engine. I ran the engine until the temperature gauge indicated normal operating temperature, checked for leaks and found none. I turned the engine off, waited about two minutes (the owner's manual says "Wait a few minutes") and the oil level was midway between the high and low marks. This is the level that is specified in the owner's manual. The shop manual says wait 3 minutes and the level should be between the high and low marks. After reading this post I checked the garage floor with a level and it is level. As such, the proper amount of oil was added and the check was done inaccordance with the owner's manual, as well as the shop manual. Therefore, I see no reason why a reading midway between the high and low marks is incorrect.

Now, on a related note I have designed many control systems which used analog gauges. In each case, under normal operating conditions, the meter needle read at, or very near, mid-scale and not at the extreme ends. So I would expect that under normal operating conditions the oil level would be at mid-scale and not at the extreme ends.

As for the dealer filling the oil level to the upper mark, well, I am not sure that is the correct thing to do. For me to bring the oil level to the full mark would require that I add more than the recommended amount of 4.2 liters.

If I am missing something someone please let me know.
 

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Don't even go there. It is most certainly NOT ridiculous, it is the one and only correct answer. There is not one engine maintenance item that is or has ever been more important than to always maintain your oil level exactly at the full mark. It is absolutely the most basic thing there is, and there is no application anywhere on Earth where it is not the one and only accepted method. The circumstances of your mistaken learning may be innocent, but they are nonetheless tragic. You might repent, and seek absolution. And then make it a cheeseburger.
"Exactly at the full mark", or what?.......an opinion that is ridiculous, ludicrous and laughable.

Between the 2 marks is fine, according to owner's manuals.
 

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I had my oil and filter changed by the dealership, since I was moving and my tools were unavailable, and the level was at the full mark. The next oil and filter change, which was done several days ago, I performed myself. The owner's manual, the shop manual, and an internet search all indicated that the proper amount of oil to add with a filter change is 4.2 liters. I bought a container of oil, which was labeled as containing 4.73 liters, and poured out 0.5 liter, which was measured. The remainder, 4.23 liters (close enough to 4.2 liters), was poured in the engine. I ran the engine until the temperature gauge indicated normal operating temperature, checked for leaks and found none. I turned the engine off, waited about two minutes (the owner's manual says "Wait a few minutes") and the oil level was midway between the high and low marks. This is the level that is specified in the owner's manual. The shop manual says wait 3 minutes and the level should be between the high and low marks. After reading this post I checked the garage floor with a level and it is level. As such, the proper amount of oil was added and the check was done inaccordance with the owner's manual, as well as the shop manual. Therefore, I see no reason why a reading midway between the high and low marks is incorrect.

Now, on a related note I have designed many control systems which used analog gauges. In each case, under normal operating conditions, the meter needle read at, or very near, mid-scale and not at the extreme ends. So I would expect that under normal operating conditions the oil level would be at mid-scale and not at the extreme ends.

As for the dealer filling the oil level to the upper mark, well, I am not sure that is the correct thing to do. For me to bring the oil level to the full mark would require that I add more than the recommended amount of 4.2 liters.

If I am missing something someone please let me know.
What year is your CR-V? We are discussing US Gen3 models here (2007-11). My owner and service manuals say 4.4 quarts, not 4.2. Also, the manuals specify only that it should be between marks, not where.
 

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"Exactly at the full mark", or what?.......an opinion that is ridiculous, ludicrous and laughable.

Between the 2 marks is fine, according to owner's manuals.
Between marks is a bare minimum standard, and is not said by Honda or anyone else to be best practice. Instead it is a recommendation designed to make the vehicle last through the warranty period. I do realize Gen 5 owners have a whole different ball of wax to dealing with this, due to the oil dilution issue, but IMO that is their problem. The Gen3 cars being discussed here do not have those issues, which is why I have one. You have a Gen5, and so your considerations are different. Don't take your anger about that out on us poor Gen3 owners, it's not our fault you chose a Gen5.

For Gen3 and earlier cars it's exactly the correct best practice, long accepted and practiced in the industry, period. So who do you think is really laughing? I don't mean for that to sound rude, but you brought it up.
 

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What year is your CR-V? We are discussing US Gen3 models here (2007-11). My owner and service manuals say 4.4 quarts, not 4.2. Also, the manuals specify only that it should be between marks, not where.
Says who?

You might be in need of an eye exam. What section is this thread in? (Hint: Not model specific.)

The OP asked:
Question About Where The Oil Should Be On The Dip Stick

Also, I'm surprised the OP didn't just go to you directly for an answer. You claimed to have "visited" each other, so I'm certain he/she knows how intelligent you are on these subjects. ?
 
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