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I have a 200 CRV with 210,000km on it. My family is the original owner, I bought the car off my parents about 4 years ago and have driven it with no problems (until now).

This year in June I was sitting idle at a traffic light and saw that the CRV temperature gauge had moved slightly (it has never moved above a stable operating temperature before). Once driving, the temp returned to normal. The car did not appear to overheat, but I was concerned because the fans did not seem to be coming on.

When I took it into the shop, they said the radiator had cracked and the low fluid level was causing the fans not to operate properly. They recommended I replace the radiator. Which I did.

A couple of weeks later I drove over 600km to visit my family. The next day, the lower rad hose blew off the radiator causing the temperature gauge needle to go off the charts. I shut the car down and called a tow truck.

The shop reattached the rad hose, filled the radiator and sent me on my way. I called the original shop and they agreed to reimburse me for the cost of the tow and the work.

I then drove the car home (another 600km) and drove around for a week or so before noticing that the radiator was leaking fluid. Back to the original shop.

They tested for a head gasket issue, but determined there was none and that the radiator was faulty, so they replaced the radiator.

I drove the car again. Mostly small trips, but no leaking. Last weekend, we took another road trip. When we returned home... the radiator was leaking again. And so, back to the shop.

Now the shop is telling me that the head gasket is blown on the car.

From what I can tell, a cracked radiator has many possible causes, while a head gasket has one primary cause. I suppose i should mention that the car was hit, while parked about a year ago and I had approximately $3,000 worth of bodywork done to the front quarter panel and grill/bumper areal. Can anyone help me out on this? I'm concerned that the extreme temperature caused by the blown rad hose caused the head gasket issue. Is there any real way to tell?
 

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fill the rad to the top run the motor with the cap off, you should not see any bubbles in the rad opening. This is with the motor up to temp and the fans turning on and off. Then turn off the car, have someone start it and watch for bubbles (stand back) . If the head gasket is ok you have to find out what is breaking the rads, maybe missing bushings or tanks are touching the frame. Good luck
 

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Welcome to the forum. Unfortunately the worst thing that can happen to any engine is overheating. End result is a blown head gasket and hopefully the cylinder head is ok. As downloader mentioned, following his directions to get all the air out if the system. Don't forget to turn on the HEATER and temperature up in order to circulate coolant properly.
As for radiator mounting, since it's had front end damage, there are four plastic nipples on top and bottom about the size of the end of your little finger. They must rest in the rubber grommets to keep the radiator stable, that may be your problem. JMHO and good luck.
David g..........:cool:
 

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Make sure the radiator fans are running. A quick test to see if they are operational is to turn on the AC, the engine doesn't even need to be warm. If both fans come on strongly, then at least you know the fans are OK.
The next test is to see if the radiator fan comes on around 194-200F and requires you to get the engine up to that temp. You can do it quicker if you place some cardboard in front of the radiator while you are idling (or keeping the throttle at approx 3k rpm until it reaches that temp or the normal indicator setting on the dash. If the radiator fan doesn't come on, you can disconnect the connector at the proper temp sending unit and just jumper it. Turn the ignition to on and see if the radiator fan now comes on. If it now works, then the sending unit is bad.
Anyhow, make sure both fans are working well.
Auto parts stores also see chemical strips or fluids that detect if there are exhaust gases in the coolant.
The free bubble test is usually a pretty good indicator. You usually have to wait until the coolant gets hot enough to open the thermostat, which usually appears as coolant moving below the radiator neck when the cap has been removed while cool.
BTW, where did first and second radiators leak? By the tank, at the hose outlets, etc?
Buffalo4
 
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