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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi, I have a 2000 Honda CR-V SE AWD with 250K+ miles...couple of days ago, rear driveshaft broke.

The mechanic told me that I need, along with rear driveshaft, front flange and 2 set of universal joint.

I ordered the rear driveshaft from Amazon but could not find the corresponding front flange and compatible universal joint to go with it.

Where do I get it?

BTW, how come broken/snapped driveshaft be repaired/re-welded?

Thanks for the education, guys!
 

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If you are talking about the prop shaft that runs from the trans to the rear differential is should be sold as a complete unit.

It is also pretty easy to change yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you are talking about the prop shaft that runs from the trans to the rear differential is should be sold as a complete unit.

It is also pretty easy to change yourself.
talking about this part:
https // www amazon.com/gp/product/B01A3US3NC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

What is front flange and universal joint? Are they needed? If so, where do I get it?
 

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The shaft you ordered is a complete unit with u-joints, flange yokes, and a carrier bearing already installed, so it just bolts right in after removing (what's left) of the old one. Removal and install is pretty easy.

I will caution you though that the aftermarket propeller shaft I ordered wasn't very good. It wasn't perfectly balanced, and grease started spewing out of the center split after less than a year. Servicing the Honda shaft with aftermarket parts if the u-joints or carrier bearing is bad is what I would suggest for most owners. Since yours was completely broken, maybe rolling the dice with the complete assembly is a better option.
 

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Understood. How long should it take to install it? THANKS for sharing your expertise.
It is 4 bolts on each end, then there is 2 bolts for the center bearing and 2 bolts for each of the 2 strap hangers. Assuming everything comes apart easy it is really like 15 minutes and can be done with basic hand tools.

You most likely won't even have to jack it up.

How much damage was done with your old one? In theory the strap hangers should catch it even if it does break.
 

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I have heard of bearings and u-joints going bad and getting loud or causing vibrations. I don't think I have ever heard of one breaking. If something seized it could happen though.

30 minutes of shop labor sounds perfectly reasonable.
 

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BTW, breaking at around 260+K miles is expected?
For a vehicle of your age, and with that many miles, any failure of any part shouldn't be a big surprise. Although the prop shaft on this vehicle does not transmit power to the rear wheels very often, it is a part that is constantly rotating and flexing, and it is common for the u-joints to become loose, or for the center carrier bearing to fail. Some owners with high mileage / low value vehicles simply remove the driveshaft at that point, and live with e a front wheel drive vehicle.

My guess is your u-joints were loose for quite some time until the joint completely failed, and broke your flange yoke(s) in the process. Maybe a mechanic at some point just never alerted to you this because a new OEM Honda prop shaft is big $, and most mechanics probably don't know that there is an aftermarket shaft available, or aftermarket parts to service the Honda shaft? I would consider yourself lucky because some very bad things could potentially happen if one end of the prop shaft broke at high speed with the other end still attached. There is metal strap under the shaft so if that happens, it doesn't drop straight on the road, but still, that's not going to do much except prevent an immediate catastrophe.
 
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