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Discussion Starter #1
For Pennsylvania inspection to pass I am told I need the driveshaft going to the rear. The price the shop found was $700-$1000.00 depending on the length. One price was from NAPA, not sure about the other. I was told I might find something cheaper online , the problem there is I don't really know where to look , nor do I know the dimension I need, 2001 Honda CR-V 4WD model, 2.4 liter I think. Any recommended sites to use? Any one have a clue on length I would need?
 

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The 2001 Honda CR-V has a 2.0 L engine.

The part you need is called the propeller shaft. Here's a parts drawing of it:


It runs down the center of the CR-V, and connects to the transmission in the front and the rear differential in the back.
The same part is used on 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001 CR-Vs.

New from a Honda dealer it's going to be over $1,000.
I checked NAPA online and they have them for about $500.
I found a bunch of listings on eBay for "new" propeller shafts starting about $150, but be careful, as one of the "new" listings mentions installing ujoints with zerk fittings, which to me means it was repaired, not new.
 

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Another possibility (assuming you have the original, defective propeller shaft) is to bring it to a 4x4/Jeep shop that will replace your crimped-in U joints.

I'm confused as to why you would need a driveshaft to pass inspection? It is quite safe to drive the car in FWD only. (Less traction, of course.) Weren't Gen1 CR-Vs sold new with only FWD?
 

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Some states do a visual inspection to make sure all the original equipment is present.

I almost got in trouble during an inspection many years ago. I had a 1967 VW Transporter van that I upgraded the engine and switched to a dual carburetor setup, and a dual Thunderbird exhaust.

The inspector opened the engine lid, said "Hmm. Looks like you have one too many carburetors in here." He checked that the "smog" equipment was intact, and then stuck the probe up one of the muffler exhausts.
I started it up and he tested it.
When he finally asked me to shut it down he looked really confused. He turned to me and asked what I'd done to the engine, and we talked about the larger pistons and cylinder, balanced and counter weighted crank, and the mild cam...and of course the carbs and what a pain it was to get them balanced correctly.

I finally asked if I had passed and he said I had, but that he was very confused, as it was the cleanest running air cooled VW he had ever tested.
 

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I'm confused as to why you would need a driveshaft to pass inspection? It is quite safe to drive the car in FWD only. (Less traction, of course.) Weren't Gen1 CR-Vs sold new with only FWD?
I would imagine it being due to bad U-Joints. Which are easily replaceable for under probably less than $100 easy. There's YouTube vidoes on this exact job for the RD1's, complete with links to the joints needed.
 

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cheapest and best option is to just remove it and operate in front wheel drive always. that's what i did, drove it several years before selling, and the car did fine. i live in the snow belt and never noticed a difference (invested in good tires). driving actually felt peppier without the shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
cheapest and best option is to just remove it and operate in front wheel drive always. that's what i did, drove it several years before selling, and the car did fine. i live in the snow belt and never noticed a difference (invested in good tires). driving actually felt peppier without the shaft.
Consiidered that but the mechanic was not even sure where to go fore that; he has a regular place for such but was skeptical. Trust his judgment.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
cheapest and best option is to just remove it and operate in front wheel drive always. that's what i did, drove it several years before selling, and the car did fine. i live in the snow belt and never noticed a difference (invested in good tires). driving actually felt peppier without the shaft.
I had not considered that, but since I ordered. received, and delivered the new shaft to the shop I guess that is not there option now. I did not know that was possible, I guess never thought of that .
 

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Some states do a visual inspection to make sure all the original equipment is present.

I almost got in trouble during an inspection many years ago. I had a 1967 VW Transporter van that I upgraded the engine and switched to a dual carburetor setup, and a dual Thunderbird exhaust.

The inspector opened the engine lid, said "Hmm. Looks like you have one too many carburetors in here." He checked that the "smog" equipment was intact, and then stuck the probe up one of the muffler exhausts.
I started it up and he tested it.
When he finally asked me to shut it down he looked really confused. He turned to me and asked what I'd done to the engine, and we talked about the larger pistons and cylinder, balanced and counter weighted crank, and the mild cam...and of course the carbs and what a pain it was to get them balanced correctly.

I finally asked if I had passed and he said I had, but that he was very confused, as it was the cleanest running air cooled VW he had ever tested.
Great story, Racoon! I was a Bus lover, and now my eldest son is. Over the years I owned a 59, a '73, a '74, and an '86. Except for the '59, all were Westfalias. The '59 was a regular passenger Microbus, and was white over red, and looked exactly like the one from Alice's Restaurant, which made me very popular on campus, as it was at the time when the movie came out. Had a double bed in the back, and curtains, so much fun was had at the drive-in. Rebuilt the motor in that thing 3 times in 5 years. The 36hp motor was not great, but that Bus would go anywhere! My son currently has a trophy-winning '65. I wanted to do a Subaru transplant in my '86, but never got to it. Ah, well, those were the days. Of course, all this was before they ever had emissions testing. Hijack over.
 

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Mine was a 1967 Westie, the first year for 12v electrical. :D
I had a 1966 Deluxe before it, that was really rusty, with part of the rear floorboard and side door sill missing.

I sold the '67 before I moved from the Los Angeles, California area to Indianapolis, Indiana. I just couldn't think of taking my Westie to somewhere that salted the roads in winter.
 
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