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DO explain. we all are curious
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
DO explain. we all are curious
I have the Hybrid so when remote starting it starts the electric motor instead of the engine.

If you have a hybrid it will turn on the engine when it needs to turn on the engine.
True but I was wondering if there was a way to warm the engine up with the remote start apart from having to drive it
 

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I was wondering if there was a way to warm the engine up with the remote start apart from having to drive it
No engine warms up idling.

It needs to be driven.
 
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I have the Hybrid so when remote starting it starts the electric motor instead of the engine.



True but I was wondering if there was a way to warm the engine up with the remote start apart from having to drive it
I don’t know of any car manufacturer that recommends letting a modern car engine warm up by idling. It’s better to start the car and drive.
 

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As far as I’m aware, this will automatically happen in cold weather conditions if you use remote start and have the climate control set to a warmer temperature. The engine will run more often to heat the interior.

For safety, one should only do this when parked outdoors.
 

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"For safety, one should only do this when parked outdoors."

I've always thought the hybrid should have a way to detect, or to be told, that it's in an enclosed area and to not start the ICE under any circumstances.
Way too easy to "start" it in a closed garage, forgetting it might fire up the ICE later if it feels the need.
Maybe an ambient air CO detector?
 

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Why do you want the ICE (the traditional engine) to come on? I can see when it is cold and you want the engine warm and then the cabin warm. But in the summer you want the battery to start the electronics and, as long as the battery has enough juice, to run off the battery until it needs the ICE to charge the hybrid battery.

Having had hybrids for maybe 10 years, I just let the electronic smarts do their thing controlling when and which engines to run.
 

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Having had hybrids for maybe 10 years, I just let the electronic smarts do their thing controlling when and which engines to run.
I have noticed a general theme for all forums on any topic/product, including this one about Honda CRV, ones about iPhones or whatever tech product, etc: anyone obsessive enough to join a forum about a product (sometimes that means us!) will often be completely incapable of leaving things alone and just using the product. Hybrid drivers try to micromanage the engine or CC with trickery. iPhone users STILL incorrectly believe they need to “close apps”.

It is like staring at the window glass instead of seeing through the window.
 

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You should never warm up the engine by idling it does not really warm up and just sits there running under temp for a prolonged amount of time. This is not good for piston and cylinder wear. Just drive it to warm it up. Put on a coat, turn on the seat heaters, and go.

interestingly enough the hybrid battery performance and engine performance suffer greatly when cold. This is why many hybrid drivers who drive city stop/go driving for short distances note a major drop in fuel efficiency in the winter. Me personally I see a 7-9 MPG drop from summer to winter. 40-41 in the summer and 33 in the winter usually. Nothing you can do, things take time to warm up.
 

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A lot of that winter mileage drop is due to running the ICE to heat the cabin even after everything's warmed up.
A little more is due to winter blend fuels in areas that use them.
Plus snowy roads don't generally give you great mileage. If you have winter tires that will cost a little mileage as well.
I agree. The seat heaters are great.
 
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The Honda iMMD hybrid drive system is elegant, efficient and fully automated, other than a few preference variables that any particular driver might prefer. It is the outcome of more than 15 years of evolutions in design at Honda for the hybrid class of motor vehicles.

General comment, not directed at anyone specifically:
I really do not get this persistent need/desire to over-ride Honda designs by manual intervention or forced modification. Modern Hondas, really all brands, are complex highly integrated sets of sensors, electronics, mechanical systems, and fluids all carefully working in concert under the design direction of Honda engineering to realize a desired driving outcome. And messing with one thing can very easily cause a cascade of issues within a vehicle.

I am of the school of ... don't mess with something that is not broken.. no matter how you may think or desire it should work" camp of modern motor vehicle drivers. Seriously.... leave automated systems on automatic... they work that way for a reason. In the case of the hybrid CRV... it works to optimize fuel economy over a wide range of driving conditions and if you tamper with it..... if you can even tamper with it... your results will very likely be inferior to what Honda has configured.

/two cents and a nickel. :)
 

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You should never warm up the engine by idling it does not really warm up and just sits there running under temp for a prolonged amount of time. This is not good for piston and cylinder wear. Just drive it to warm it up. Put on a coat, turn on the seat heaters, and go.
Sorry, but I'm a bit confused by this. Maybe because I haven't really owned a "modern" car. But are you saying when it's 20ºF outside and the car's been sitting all night, I should just turn it on and go?

We had that in Texas back in February. Yeah, we're not used to that down here. But I let it sit about a minute before I set off for work. Mainly because I was trying to defrost the windows and make sure work was even going to be open.

Now if OP's asking about just waiting until it gets to operating temperature before taking off, I think that's excessive.
 

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Sorry, but I'm a bit confused by this. Maybe because I haven't really owned a "modern" car. But are you saying when it's 20ºF outside and the car's been sitting all night, I should just turn it on and go?

We had that in Texas back in February. Yeah, we're not used to that down here. But I let it sit about a minute before I set off for work. Mainly because I was trying to defrost the windows and make sure work was even going to be open.

Now if OP's asking about just waiting until it gets to operating temperature before taking off, I think that's excessive.
Yes. Climb in, start the engine, fasten your seat belt and check mirrors. In that short time putting on seat belt and checking mirrors.... your engine is ready to go. It only takes that long to get all the internal nooks and crannies oiled and the machine tolerances are so tight and precise in modern engines, they are good to go immediately.

Yes in the "old days" letting an engine warm a bit after starting was generally a practice that benefited a vehicle. We also had carbureators rather than fuel injection, heavy weight oils to protect the engine rather than water thin 0W20, bias ply tires... etc etc.

Times change though and modern engines, particularly small 4 cylinder engines are so efficient now days that just sitting idle.. they will NOT warm up. You have to drive them at modest rpm and driving load in order to warm the engine.

Delaying driving away due to frosted windows... is a completely prudent and different consideration.. a safe driving requirement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yes for the reasons davidg4781 listed I'm wanting the ability to remote start ICE for at least a minute or two before driving off in the cold weather.

Sorry, but I'm a bit confused by this. Maybe because I haven't really owned a "modern" car. But are you saying when it's 20ºF outside and the car's been sitting all night, I should just turn it on and go?

We had that in Texas back in February. Yeah, we're not used to that down here. But I let it sit about a minute before I set off for work. Mainly because I was trying to defrost the windows and make sure work was even going to be open.

Now if OP's asking about just waiting until it gets to operating temperature before taking off, I think that's excessive.
 

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I'm wanting the ability to remote start ICE for at least a minute or two before driving off in the cold weather.
....which achieves absolutely nothing except wasted fuel.
 

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Yes for the reasons davidg4781 listed I'm wanting the ability to remote start ICE for at least a minute or two before driving off in the cold weather.
Not needed, in the slightest, though.

I suggest instead, you adapt to your new vehicle as it is designed and presented in production units.

The only purpose in a modern Honda for remote start is to get just enough heat from combustion to warm the cabin so it is not completely cold inside before you step in. It serves no benefit for the engine. AND.. it's the least efficient way to try to pre-warm your vehicle cabin.

The best practice in cold weather conditions is to install a block heater and use it in very cold weather. Not for the sake of the engine.. but for the sake of a warm cabin within a minute of engine start... because the engine is already warm from overnight nurture from the block heater.
 

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Sorry, but I'm a bit confused by this. Maybe because I haven't really owned a "modern" car. But are you saying when it's 20ºF outside and the car's been sitting all night, I should just turn it on and go?

We had that in Texas back in February. Yeah, we're not used to that down here. But I let it sit about a minute before I set off for work. Mainly because I was trying to defrost the windows and make sure work was even going to be open.

Now if OP's asking about just waiting until it gets to operating temperature before taking off, I think that's excessive.
Yes absolutely. This notion of "Warming up" the engine was necessary long ago for older cars when it was cold out. Modern engines are so well refined, tolerances so tight, oil technology so good (0W-20 anyone?) that there is no need to warm up anything and in fact idling will never get the engine to "Operating temperature". This is also in part to RPM's being low at idle (to save fuel among other reasons) and engine cooling being very efficient.
There are many outdated notions about cars that are just plain not true anymore.
"Breaking in an engine slowly" not necessary for modern engines. Modern cars recommend avoiding going above certain RPM's (sudden acceleration or breaking) for the first 500 miles not because of the engine but other components such as brakes and suspension.
"Changing oil at 3000 miles" not necessary with modern cars. Most are 5000 to 10000 and most now have oil monitoring systems that tell you exactly when it is necessary and there is literally 0 reasons to change it before then.
"Switching from regular oil to synthetic oil will hurt the engine". Long ago when they FIRST developed synthetic motor oil, yes there were problems that caused engine issues. Synthetic oil is so common and manufactured so regularly now there is no danger to any modern engine by switching and should be done as the engine ages. Most very modern engines require synthetic from day 1 for the life of the car. Synthetic has simply a better tighter molecular weight distribution than dinosaur oil can ever have. It is just plain better.
Only certain old cars absolutely "need" dinosaur oil because they were designed to work only with that oil. They are few and far between however.

Welcome to the 21st century lol.

The best practice in cold weather conditions is to install a block heater and use it in very cold weather. Not for the sake of the engine.. but for the sake of a warm cabin within a minute of engine start... because the engine is already warm from overnight nurture from the block heater.
Even a block heater wastes electricity all night. I say get a jacket on. Use seat heaters. steering wheel heater if you have it and go.

Delaying driving away due to frosted windows... is a completely prudent and different consideration.. a safe driving requirement.
Totally. If your windows are frosted scrape them by all means before driving. be safe. I have also seen people mix vinegar solutions and spray them on their windshield and it melts the frost very quickly. I have never tried this tho.
 
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