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About a month ago, I started noticing that my CR-V was lagging a bit to start as I turned the key in the ignition switch. It's like it was taking longer for something to engage and fire up the engine. The trouble was intermittant, but progressively grew worse and about a week ago, the car refused to start at all. There was a whirr, whirr sound as the car tried to start, and then nothing. I did some research and learned that I was falling victim to one of the common problems of the Hondas, a mysterious intermittant starting issue. Upon trying to start the car again about 10 minutes later, it started successfully. I went ahead and ordered a new starter, learning that the problem was probably related to the starter motor, although the guy at AutoZone said that my battery, starter, and ignition tested good.

Well last night, the starter finally threw in the towel. When I turn the key in the ignition, nothing, no matter how long I wait and try again.

So we watched some Youtube videos and read lots of articles and decided to tackle the job of replacing the starter (looked easy enough... :confused:).

Everything is going well until we get to the Intake Manifold removal. Once we've got the bolts off the manifold and can slide the manifold away from the engine block, it seems that there's just not enough room to fully remove the manifold from the car. The lower black plastic part of the manifold keeps getting caught between the engine block and the fans... and there's not enough room to slide the manifold to the side or turn it in any direction to slide it out. Then, we revisit the Youtube videos and it's like all these guys are just "VOILA! Manifold is out!" No one is showing us how they got it out. Am I missing a critical step here? Photos attached of what we're dealing with.

When I look at the manifold, I can't figure out how (or even if we need) to remove the steel portion of the manifold from the black plastic portion - there are some O-rings that are holding the two pieces together. None of the videos are indicating I need to remove bolts or O-rings holding these two pieces together.

Can anyone lend some advice into how we need to remove this manifold? What step am I missing here?? We've tried to go at the starter anyway, by pushing the manifold aside as much as possible, but there's just not enough room to squeeze hands in or turn ratchets to remove either the positive terminal screw on the starter, or either of the 2 screws holding the starter to the engine block.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I should add that I've confirmed that the starter IS the problem. After the car refused to start at all, we took a listen under the hood as one of us turned the key in the ignition, and a clicking (I would even describe it as a quick grind) was heard from under the engine. No sounds of the car attempting to rev the engine at all, so I'm thinking no power going to the engine.
 

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Hello Heather, did you ever manage to remove the manifold and replace the starter? Or did you attack it from underneath? If I end up replacing it, I'm wonder it it's best to try from up to or follow the service manual where it instructs removal of the starter from underneath. I would typically just follow the service manual but I saw another post where the poster di just that, and commented how difficult it was and recommended trying from the top if at all possible.

What brand started did you go with? Thanks for any input.
 

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We just noticed that the 2005 we bought for our daughter has the intermittent starting issue. I have had this on one other car and usually it is one bad solenoid that starts a cascade of frustration, as it does seem to start after a couple minutes second or third try. I was curious about a brand for the replacement starter as well. Sometimes these are heat related, others can be corrosion from slushy waters during bad Winters or just plain wear and tear. Starters, and anything that has a serpentine belt around it is always labor intensive, but if you have another to assist you and the right tools, it can be done as good as at most mechanics shops. I would rather save that $100 per hour on labor as I have worked on cars and motorcycles for half of my life.

I am a little irritated that this needs to be replaced but the car has almost 142,000 miles on it. Strangely the previous owner, we know through family and marriage, and she hadn't replaced anything except the basic wear items and some fluids. I replaced almost all fluids, tires, brakes and this will be the first attached item. I guess for the reliability and the low initial cost of the vehicle, this is pretty decent rate of replacement. I just don't want to do any more this year.
 

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Replaced my CRV 2007 starter. I can confirmed that you have to unbolt and move the intake manifold out of the way. There was no room to get the manifold out of the engine. I worked around it. You also need to work underneath.
 

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I'm in the middle of replacing the starter in my 08 V.
If you remove the plastic cover going across the upper radiator support/bulkhead it will give more room to remove the intake manifold.
Word of caution to anyone in the snow belt where road salt is used.
Upon removing the intake manifold it became crystal clear that the water pipe running parallel below the intake manifold was severely corroded.
Just the slightest tap against the pipe wrenching the starter bolts created a pinhole leak. This pipe would've let loose on its own in short order.
The bolt securing the rear of the water pipe was severely rusted and could not be removed without grinding it down and drilling it out.
Hopefully, this weekend everything will be back together.
Rusted Water Pipe.JPG Intake Water Nipple.JPG
 

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Hello Heather, did you ever manage to remove the manifold and replace the starter? Or did you attack it from underneath? If I end up replacing it, I'm wonder it it's best to try from up to or follow the service manual where it instructs removal of the starter from underneath. I would typically just follow the service manual but I saw another post where the poster di just that, and commented how difficult it was and recommended trying from the top if at all possible.

What brand started did you go with? Thanks for any input.
I know this is an old post and the person who asked is probably gone. But I want to give an update in case someone came across this post in the future and have the same question (like me).

This weekend I replaced the starter on my 2007. I did try to go from below first. Taking out the splash guard was straightforward, and after that you can see the starter right away. It looked very tempting. The starter is held in place by 2 bolts. The outside one is 17mm, and the inside one is 14mm. The inside one is special: it has an extended neck, to make its head nearer to the opening (from where you can put the socket on). Both of them are screwed on very tight. The 17mm is more open, and with some struggling (including WD-40 to loosen somewhat), can be broken. But the 14mm is a different matter. The main thing is that the place is so tight, and you cannot put the socket in if the socket is already attached to a wrench head. If you just put a standalone socket in, you can, but then you cannot attach the ratcheting wrench head to it, mostly because it's so tight and you don't have space to insert your finger to hold the socket while attaching.

I have read that the Honda service personnel has a way to just go from the bottom and it works. Maybe they have some special tool? I spent a long time but didn't see how you can get it done with the common tool. Not to mention taking the starter out from below won't be simple either (considering all the hooks and clips, as I realized after successfully taking the manifold out later).

Hence I ended up going from above. The bottom work was not in vain though, because you still need to open it up to remove the bracket that go from the manifold to the engine, situating right in front of the starter.
When going from above, I had to unhook a number of vacuum hoses, but didn't have to unclip the big coolant line on the right. I was able to wiggle the manifold towards the right and completely out.

As for the brand, I went with Napa premium. Cost was about $170 not including core charge of $77. It works well for now, at least.
 

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Perhaps the 'Special Tool' is a set of wobble extensions.

https://www.harborfreight.com/catal...tured+Weight,f,Sale+Rank,f&q=wobble+extension




As you can see, these allow an angled approach to the fasteners in question, without the bulk of a universal joint. :beerchug:

Some of the most used items in MY toolbox. :clap:
As it turns out, I did have this set, as well as a number of "knuckle" joints to change the angle. But all of them will be either too bulky to fit in, or become so twisted it just can't carry anywhere near enough torque to turn that bolt.

The problem isn't that we cannot fit the ratcheting head in. The opening is about than 2 inches wide, and is narrow (3-4 inches long), so a head can fit, but nothing else. The head and the socket are close and in the right "position", but I couldn't find away to "slot" the head into the socket to turn. We need another finger to hold the socket in place to do that. There's a youtube video where someone can do it from below on an Element, and there I can see there's a narrow channel alongside the starter where he can insert his fingers to hold the socket in place. That makes all the difference. Here there's only one way in, and if you go in with a wrench head, there's no other space for your fingers.

So if I'm to design a tool I'm thinking of something that has a much smaller head, and even pre-attached to the socket with a slightly curved neck.
 
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